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Full text of "College Catalogs 1932-1938"

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126188 



Spring Hill College 
Catalogues, 1932-1938. 



THOMAS BYRNE MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

MOBILE, ALABAMA 





DATE DUE 




SEP i 


1 1985 














































































































































GAYLORD 






PRINTED IN U.S.A. 



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in 2012 with funding from 

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Spring Hill College 



Catalogue 1932-1933 




One Hundredth and Second Annual Announcement 



THE THOMAS BYRNE 
I 

SPRir COLLEGE 
SPRING HI 



Spring Hill, Mobile County, Alabama 
March, 1932 



V 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



A COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

FOUNDED IN 1830 



CHARTERED AS A COLLEGE BY THE LEGISLATURE 
OF ALABAMA IN 1836 



Empowered by Pope Gregory XVI to Grant Degrees in 
Philosophy and Theology in 1840 



Member of the Southern Association of Colleges, 

The Association of American Colleges, and of 

The Association of Alabama Colleges 



Corporate Title: The President and Trustees of the 

Spring Hill College, in the County of 

Mobile, Alabama. 



TRUSTEES OF SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

VERY REV. JOSEPH M. WALSH, S. J., 
Chairman 

REV. EDGAR J. BERNARD, S. J., 
Secretary 

REV. G. G. McHARDY, S. J., 
Treasurer 



THE SPRING HILL COLLEGE FOUNDATION 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

VERY REV. JOSEPH M. WALSH, S. J., 
Chairman 

REV. GEORGE G. McHARDY, S. J. 

DR. WILLIAM M. MASTIN, L. L. D. 

THOMAS M. STEVENS, L. L .D. 

J. M. WALSH 



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College Calendar 



1932— 

Sept. 12 — Registration 

Sept. 13 — Recitations and Lectures begin 

Nov. 1 — Feast of All Saints 

Nov. 24 — Thanksgiving Day — Full Holiday 

Dec. 8 — Feast of the Immaculate Conception 

Dec. 20 — Christmas Recess begins 

1933— 

Jan. 4 — Lectures — Recitations resumed 

Feb. 1 — Second Semester begins 

Feb. 27, 28 — Shrovetide Holidays 

Mar. 19 — Feast of St. Joseph, Patron of the College 

April 12 — Easter Recess begins 

April 18 — Lectures — Recitations resumed 

May 25 — Feast of the Ascension 

May 30 — Commencement Exercises 

June 6 — Second Semester ends 



ft? 

x 126188 



Officers of Administration 



REV. JOSEPH M. WALSH, S. J., 
President 

REV. EDWARD CUMMINGS, S. J., 
Dean 

REV. D. RICHARD NEEDHAM, S. J., 
Prefect of Discipline 

REV. EDGAR J. BERNARD, S. J., 

Secretary 

REV. GEORGE G. McHARDY, S. J., 
Treasurer 

LOUIS J. BOUDOUSQUIE, B. S., 

Registrar 

REV. EDWARD T. CASSIDY, S. J., 
Dean of Men 



Officers of Instruction 



REV. JOSEPH B. BASSICH, S. J., 
Professor of Education and Head of the Department 

LOUIS J. BOUDOUSQUIE, B. S., 
Professor of Drawing and Mathematics 

PATRICK W. BROWN, A. B., L. L. B., 

Professor of Economics and Finance 
Assistant Director of Athletics 

HARRY L. CRANE, S. J., 

Professor of History and English 

Director of the Sphinghillian 

REV. DANIEL M. CRONIN, S. J., 
Professor of Mathematics 

REV. JOHN DEIGNAN, S. J., 
Professor of Chemistry 

REV. JAMES E. DePOTTER, S. J., 
Professor of Education and Philosophy, 
Librarian 



Officers of Instruction 



MICHAEL J. DONAHUE, A. B., 

Professor of Economics and Education, 

Director of Athletics 

KERMIT T. HART, B. S., B. A., 

Head of the Department of Commerce 

Professor of Accounting and Finance 

REV. JOHN HUTCHINS, S. J., 
Professor of Romance Language 

REV. MICHAEL KENNY, S. J., 
Professor of Phychology and Sociology 

WILLIAM M. MASTIN, M. D., L. L. D., 

Consulting Physician 

REV. Wm. A. MULHERIN, S. J., 
Professor of Philosophy and English 

JOSEPH C. MULHERN, S. J., 
Professor of English and Ancient Classics 

REV. D. RICHARD NEEDHAM, S. J., 
Professor of Mathematics 

REV. WILLIAM OBERING, S. J., 
Professor of Ethics, Sociology and Special Metaphysics 

REV. PETER P. O'SULLIVAN, S. J., 
Professor of Latin and English 

ANGELO J. SUFFICH. MUS. B.. 
Professor of Music 

EUGENE THAMES, M. D., 
Attending Physician 

CORNELIUS THENSTED, S. J., 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 

Director of the Corsair 

FRANCIS J. WASHICHEK, A. B., M. A., 
Professor of German 

REV. ANTHONY J. WESTLAND, S. J., 

Professor of Physics and Spanish, 

Director of the Seismic Observatory 

REV. PATRICK H. YANCEY, S. J., 

Professor of Biology and Spanish 

Director of the Mendel Club and the 

Spring Hill Lecture Club 



General Statement 



Spring Hill College enjoys the distinction of being 
one of the first institutions of higher learning established 
in the South. It was founded in the year 1830 by the 
Rt. Rev. Michael Portier, D. D., the first Bishop of Mobile. 
In 1836, the Legislature of the State of Alabama incorpo- 
rated it, giving it all the rights and privileges of a 
university, and in the year 1840, the Sovereign Pontiff, 
George XVI, empowered it to grant canonical degrees in 
philosophy and theology. In 1847 the management of 
the College was entrusted to the Society of Jesus, whose 
members have since endeavored to make it a center of 
liberal culture. Spring Hill College was admitted to 
membership in the Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools of the Southern States in 1922. Without inter- 
ruption, the work of the College has continued for more 
than a century. The year 1930 witnessed the celebration 
of its one hundredth anniversary. 

Spring Hill College is picturesquely situated on an 
elevation two hundred feet above the sea level in Mobile's 
most beautiful residential district. The natural beauty of 
its site adorned with an almost endless variety of trees 
and shrubs and flowers, its artificial lake, its shaded ave- 
nues and the striking setting of its athletic fields and of 
its buildings make the Spring Hill campus one of the most 
attractive college sites in the United States. 

Owing to its altitude and to the invigorating influ- 
ences of its resinous pines upon the surrounding atmos- 
phere, Spring Hill holds one of the best records for health 
in the country. In fact, very eminent physicians, well 
acquainted with our American colleges, have declared it 
pre-eminently desirable for students on account of its 
climatic advantages and perfect hygienic arrangements. 
The records of the United States Weather Bureau of 
Mobile show that for a period of fifty years, there is an 
average of only ninety-five cloudy days a year ; and most 



CATALOGUE 



of these were only partly cloudy. Besides, the temper- 
ature is most equable; figures for the school year during 
the last ten years showing that the City of Mobile enjoys 
an average of 62.7 degrees. Outdoor exercise continues 
uninterruptedly from the beginning of the school year to 
the end. 

Spring Hill College at present offers four years of 
undergraduate study, leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Com- 
merce, and Bachelor of Science in Biology. Two-year 
courses are given in Engineering, Pre-Dental, Pre-Legal, 
and Pre-Medical work. In the light of the findings of the 
Association of the American Medical College, the faculty 
advise students preparing for the study of medicine to 
take a Pre-Medical course of three years. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

Spring Hill College has extensive acreage, which af- 
fords ample room for buildings and athletic fields. The 
group of buildings consists of the Main Building, Mobile 
Hall, Yenni Hall, the Infirmary, the Chapel, the Thomas 
Byrne Memorial Library, and the Recreation Hall. 

THE MAIN BUILDING was erected in 1869, and is 
a substantial brick structure, several hundred feet in 
length and three stories high. The central part is occu- 
pied by the Faculty and the Administrative offices. From 
the third gallery of this building one may get a most 
beautiful view of the surrounding country, with its pine- 
clad hills, and the Bay of Mobile in the distance. 

MOBILE HALL, which was dedicated November 6, 
1927, is a splendid dormitory building, with rooms that 
leave nothing to be desired in the way of utility and com- 
fort. Each one is large and airy, and provided with its 
own clothes press, toilet and hot and cold shower. In 
this building is a billiard room and a lounging room. 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



YENNI HALL, erected and named in memory of 
Rev. Dominic Yenni, S.J., Professor of Latin and Greek 
at Spring Hill for over fifty years, and author of Yenni's 
Latin and Greek Grammar, is entirely devoted to Science. 
Here are installed the Physics, Chemistry and Biology 
Lecture rooms and Laboratories, and the Seismographic 
Station, which is one of the few in the entire South. 

THE INFIRMARY BUILDING is separated from the 
other buildings, and is equipped to take care of all ordi- 
nary cases of illness. It is supplied with a complete phar- 
macy, and is under the direction of a physician of Mobile, 
who visits the College at frequent intervals. 

THE CHAPEL occupies the center of the architec- 
tural group, and is connected with the main building by 
concrete galleries. It is a stately Gothic structure which 
is generally considered the most perfect building of its 
kind in the South. 

THE THOMAS BYRNE MEMORAIL LIBRARY has 
space for 150,000 volumes. A general reading room, 
large enough to accommodate two hundred students and 
special rooms for quiet research work are provided for in 
this splendid structure. 

THE RECREATION HALL is used as a recreation 
center. 

Spring Hill has several athletic fields, and ample 
space for more. One, in particular, is exceptionally fine. 
It is called Maxon Field, after a former coach of the 
College — a stretch divided in half by a beautiful avenue 
of aged oaks, and surrounded by stately pines. Here the 
intra-mural baseball leagues hold forth, several teams 
being able to play at the same time. A nine-hole golf 
course is maintained, affording an opportunity for those, 
who may be inclined to engage in this fascinating sport. 



CATALOGUE 



CURRICULUM 

The purpose of Spring Hill College is to educate in 
the fullest sense, that is, to develop thoroughly and har- 
moniously the faculties of the whole man— intellectual, 
moral and physical. It assumes that on this harmonious 
development will depend the character of the students 
and the measure of their future utility to themselves and 
to the community ; and it aims to give that solid training 
of both mind and heart, which will make for this develop- 
ment and will fit the student for the just interpretation 
and use of life. 

In the intellectual training of its students, the insti- 
tution aims at laying a solid foundation in the elements 
of knowledge and at opening the mind to a generous 
share in the culture of life. For this reason the studies 
are chosen each for its distinct educational value and as 
a part in a complete and nicely adjusted system. The 
studies are so graded and classified as to be adapted to 
the mental growth of the student and to his orderly ac- 
quisition of knowledge. 

The courses leading to degrees embrace instruction 
in the Departments of Philosophy, Sociology, Language, 
Literature, History, Science and Mathematics. The aim 
of these courses is to give the student a complete liberal 
education, which will train and develop all the powers of 
the mind, and will cultivate no one faculty to an exag- 
gerated degree at the expense of the others. The college 
ideal is not to foster specialization, but to cultivate the 
mind, to build thought and reasoning and that breadth of 
view which must ever be the foundation as well of more 
advanced scholarship, as of eminence in the professions 
or other stations of life. 

The two-year courses are designed for those students, 
who are unable to spend four years in a regular Arts or 
Science course. 



10 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

SYSTEM OF EDUCATION 

The officers and teachers in the College are for the 
most part members of the Jesuit order, an organization, 
which from its origin, has devoted itself to the education 
of youth. It conducts high schools, colleges and univer- 
sities throughout the United States, and has more than 
twenty-five thousand students in its various institutions. 

The principles of education, which have made the 
Jesuits successful in educational work throughout the 
world, and which are followed at Spring Hill as in every 
Jesuit institution, are set forth in the Ratio Studiorum, a 
body of rules and suggestions outlined by the most prom- 
inent Jesuit educators in 1599, revised in 1832, and at- 
tended to up to the present day with unfailing results. 

Truly psychological in its methods, and based upon 
the very nature of man's mental process, it secures on the 
one hand that stability so essential to educational thor- 
oughness, while on the other, it is elastic, and makes lib- 
eral allowances for the widely varying circumstances of 
time and place. While retaining, as far as possible, all 
that is unquestionably valuable in the older learning, it 
adopts and incorporates the best results of modern pro- 
gress. It is a noteworthy fact, however, that many of the 
recently devised methods of teaching, such as the Natu- 
ral, and Inductive and similar methods, are admittedly 
in reality mere revivals of devices recommended long 
ago in the Ratio Studioninu* 

As understood by the Jesuits, education in its com- 
plete sense, is the full and harmonious development of 
all those faculties that are distinctive of man. It is more 
than mere instruction or the communication of knowl- 
edge. The acquirement of knowledge, though it neces- 
sarily pertains to any recognized system of education, is 



*Those who are desirous of further information on the subject are referred 
to "Jesuit Education," by Robert Swickera*th, S.J. (Herder, St. Louis, 1903), and 
to the numerous document* therein cited. 



CATALOGUE 11 



only a secondary result of Education itself. Learning is 
an instrument of education, which has for its end culture 
and mental and moral development. 

Consonant with this view of the purpose of educa- 
tion, it is clear that only such means be chosen both in 
kind and amount, as will effectively further the purpose 
of education itself. A student cannot be forced, within 
the short period of his school course and with his imma- 
ture faculties, to study a multiplicity of the languages 
and sciences into which the vast world of knowledge has 
been scientifically divided. It is evident, therefore, that 
the purpose of the mental training given is not proximate- 
ly to fit the student for some special employment or 
profession, but to give him such a general, vigorous and 
rounded development, as well enable him to cope success- 
fully even with the unforeseen emergencies of life. While 
affording mental stability, it tends to remove the insular- 
ity of thought and want of mental elasticity, which is 
one of the most hopeless and disheartening results of 
specialization on the part of students, who have not 
brought to their studies the uniform mental training 
given by a systematic college course. These studies, there- 
fore, are so graded and classified as to be adapted to the 
mental growth of the student and to the scientific unfold- 
ing of knowledge. They are so chosen and communicated, 
that the student will gradually and harmoniously reach, 
as nearly as may be, that measure of culture of which he 
is capable. 

It is fundamental in the Jesuit system, that different 
studies have distinct educational values. Mathematics, 
the Natural Sciences, Language and History are comple- 
mentary instruments of education to which the doctrine 
of equivalents cannot be applied. The specific training 
given by one cannot be applied to another. The best 
educators of the present day are beginning to realize 
more fully, than ever before, that prescribed curricula, 



12 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

embracing well chosen and co-ordinate studies, afford 
the student the most efficient means of mental cultiva- 
tion and development. This, however, does not prohibit 
the offering of more than one of such systematic courses, 
as for instance, the Classical and the Scientific, in view 
of the future career of the individual. While recogniz- 
ing the importance of Mathematics and the Natural 
Sciences, which unfold the interdependence and laws of 
the world of time and space, the Jesuit System of edu- 
cation has unwaveringly kept Language in a position of 
honor, as an instrument of culture. Mathematics and 
the Natural Sciences bring the student into contact with 
the material aspects of nature, and exercise the deductive 
and inductive powers of reason. Language and History 
effect a higher union. They are manifestations of spirit 
to spirit, and by their study and their acquirement, the 
whole mind of man is brought into widest and subtlest 
play. The acquisition of Languages especially calls for 
delicacy of judgment and fineness of perception, and for 
a constant, keen and quick use of the reasoning powers. 

Much stress is also laid on Mental and Moral philos- 
ophy, as well for the influence such study has in men- 
tal development, as for its power in steadying the judg- 
ment of the student in his outlook on the world and on 
life. Rational Philosophy, as a means of developing 
young manhood, is an instrument of strength and effec- 
tiveness. 

But to obtain these results, Philosophy must be such 
in reality, as well as in name. It must not content itself 
with vague groping after light, with teaching merely the 
history of Philosophy; detailing the vagaries of the 
human mind without venturing to condemn them; re- 
viewing the contradictory systems, which have held sway 
for a time, without any expression of opinion as to the 
fatal defects which caused them to be discarded. It must 
do more than this. It must present a logical, unified, com- 



CATALOGUE 13 



plete system of mind-culture in accord with the estab- 
lished laws of human thought; it must take its stand on 
some definite propositions expressive of truth; it must 
rise to the dignity of a science. With such a definite 
system to defend against attack, the mind becomes more 
acute and plastic, the logical powers are strengthened, 
the value of a proof is properly estimated, the vulner- 
able points of error are readily detected, and truth comes 
forth triumphant from every conflict of mind with mind. 
Finally, the Jesuit System does not share the delu- 
sion of those who seem to imagine that education under- 
stood, as an enriching and stimulating of the intellectual 
faculties, has of itself a morally elevating influence in 
human life. While conceding the effects of education in 
energizing and refining the student's imagination, taste, 
understanding and powers of observation, it has always 
held that knowledge and intellectual development of 
themselves have no moral efficacy. Religion alone can 
purify the heart and guide and strengthen the will. This 
being the case, the Jesuit System aims at developing side 
by side the moral and intellectual faculties of the stu- 
dent, and sending forth into the world men of sound 
judgment, of acute and rounded intellect, of upright and 
manly conscience. It maintains that, to be effective, 
morality is to be taught continuously; it must be the un- 
derlying base, the vital force, supporting and animating 
the whole organic structure of education. It must suffuse 
with its light all that is read, illuminating what is noble 
and exposing what is base, giving to the true and false 
their relative light and shade. In a word, the purpose 
of Jesuit teaching is to lay a solid substructure in the 
whole mind and character for any superstructure of 
science, professional and special, as well as for the up- 
building of moral life, civil and religious. 



14 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

MORAL AND RELIGIOUS TRAINING 

In its moral and religious training, the college aims 
at building the conscience of its students for the right ful- 
filment of their civil, social and religious duties. There is 
insistence on the cultivation of the Christian virtues which 
operate for this fulfilment; and, as the only solid basis 
of virtue and morality, thorough instruction in the prin- 
ciples of religion forms an essential part of the system. 
Students of any denomination are admitted to the courses, 
and all are required to show a respectful demeanor dur- 
ing the ordinary exercises of public prayer. The Catholic 
students are required to attend the classes in Evidence of 
Religion, to be present at the chapel exercises, to make 
an annual retreat, and to approach the Sacraments at 
least once a month. 



CATALOGUE 15 



Administration 



SESSIONS 



The school year begins about the middle of Septem- 
ber and ends in the beginning of June. The year is di- 
vided into two semesters or sessions of eighteen weeks 
each. The first semester ends during the last week of 
January. The second begins immediately thereafter, 
without mid-year holidays. 

ATTENDANCE 

Every student is obliged to attend every lecture 
scheduled for his class, and all study periods, and unau- 
thorized absence, even from one class exercise, will de- 
prive him of the privileges of those who are in good 
standing, and lower his monthly mark in the subject 
treated during his absence. Credit for a course will be 
lost if the record for attendance is less than 85 per cent. 
In case of prolonged absence, due to illness or the like, 
this rule may be modified, but in any case all class work 
must be satisfactorily made up. 

Attendance is counted from the day of registration, 
and continues until the last exercise of each semester. 
Hence it is important that parents see that their boys 
report at school on the appointed day and remain until 
school closes at the end of each semester. Leave of ab- 
sence during the term, and permission to leave in advance 
of the appointed day for the Christmas holidays or for 
the summer vacation, should not be asked by parents, 
and will not be granted except for very serious reasons. 

Tardiness in class attendance is regarded as a par- 
tial absence, and three tardy marks will be recorded as 
one absence. 



16 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

DISCIPLINE 

THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM employed by the 
College includes, as one of its most important features, 
the formation of character. For this reason, the disci- 
pline, while considerate, is unflinchingly firm, especially 
when the good of the student body and the reputation of 
the institution are concerned. 

While it is the policy of the Faculty to trust as much 
as possible to the honor of the students themselves, in 
carrying on the government of the College, nevertheless, 
for the maintaining of order and discipline, without 
which the desired results are not attainable, regular and 
punctual attendance, obedience to college regulations, 
serious application to study and blameless conduct will 
be insisted upon; and honor, fair-dealing, self-restraint 
and fortitude will be demanded as the natural and nec- 
essary virtues of genuine character. Any serious breach 
of college discipline, repeated violation of regulations, 
neglect of studies, the possession or use of intoxicating 
liquors, and other offenses against morals or discipline 
which, in the judgment of the Faculty, reflect on the good 
name of the College, render the offender liable to dis- 
missal. 

The College reserves the right to dismiss at any time 
a student who fails to give satisfactory evidence of ear- 
nestness of purpose and of interest in the serious work of 
college life. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Examinations in all subjects are held at the end of 
each semester. Besides, there are written monthly tests. 
The semester examination, together with the average of 
the months preceding, determine the standing of a pupil 
for the semester. The results of all examinations 
and tests are mailed to parents and guardians. If a pupil, 
on account of sickness or any other cause, misses a month- 



CATALOGUE 17 



ly test or an examination in any subject, he will be re- 
quired to make it up. In such cases, however, the re- 
sponsibility rests with the student, and his record will 
show zero until such test or examination is taken. 

Seventy percent is required for passing in each sub- 
ject. Sixty to sixty -nine constitutes a "condition," less 
than sixty, a "failure. " 

Conditions may be incurred by failure to satisfy the 
requirements of any course, which requirements include 
the recitations, tests, and other assigned work, as well 
as the examinations. A condition due, either to failure in 
a monthly test or in a semester examination, may be re- 
moved by a supplementary test or examination. The 
supplementary tests may be taken at the convenience of 
the Professor. The supplementary examinations are 
held, upon recommendation of the department concerned 
and with the approval of the Dean of the College, during 
the first month of the succeeding semester. They may 
be taken only on the days specified, and may not be de- 
ferred, except with the express consent of the Dean. For 
each subject a fee is charged, payable in advance to the 
Treasurer of the College. Removal of conditions by ex- 
aminations shall not entitle the student to a grade higher 
than seventy per cent. 

A student may take only one examination to remove 
a condition. If he fails to pass the subject, in both the 
regular and supplementary examination, he must repeat 
the entire subject in class. 

A condition due to failure to complete assigned work 
may be removed by making up the required work. 

TRANSCRIPT OF RECORD 

Students wishing transcript of records in order to 
transfer from this College to another, or for any other 
purpose, should make early and seasonable application 
for the same. No such statements will be made out dur- 



18 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

ing the busy periods of examination and registration, 
September 10 to 25, January 25 to February 5, and June 
1 to 15. One transcript of record is furnished free. One 
dollar is charged for additional copies. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

THE SCHOLASTIC YEAR is divided into two semes- 
ters. The first semester begins about the second week of 
September; the second, in the last week of January. 

REGULAR CHARGES (per semester) 



a. For Boarders 
Basic Fee $340.00 

Includes Tuition, Board, Room, Laundry, Medical, 
Athletic and Library Fees. 

A deposit of fifty dollars ($50.00) is required to 
cover cost of books and stationery, cleaning, pressing and 
mending of clothes and to provide for spending money, 
entertainments and incidentals. 

Resident students will not be allowed to remain at 
the College during the Christmas holidays. 

b. For Day Students 

Tuition $75.00 

Athletic and Library Fees $15.00 

EXPENSES INSURRED BY SOME STUDENTS 

There is a registration fee of ten dollars payable the 
first year only, and a graduation fee of fifteen dollars 
payable the last semester before graduation. For each 
Science there is a laboratory fee of seven and one-half 
dollars per semester, and for Accounting a laboratory 
fee of five dollars per semester. 
For conditional examinations taken on assigned days a fee 



CATALOGUE 19 



of two dollars is charged, payable before the examina- 
tion; for conditional examinations taken on other than 
assigned days, a fee of five dollars is charged. One 
transcript of a student's record is furnished free. One 
dollar is charged for each additional transcript. 

A tuition fee of one dollar for each semester is 
charged all students not regularly registered in the De- 
partment of Commerce, who take the following courses: 
All courses in Commerce not marked "E". 

There is a charge of fifty dollars per semester for 
those who take music lessons; twenty-five dollars for 
drawing, except when it is part of the student's regular 
course; and twenty dollars each for Stenography and 
Typewriting. 

A fee of five dollars per semester is charged for the 
use of the golf course. 

A deposit of ten dollars must be made before a room 
is considered reserved. This amount will be held as se- 
curity against damage to room or furniture. 

TREASURY REGULATIONS 

All bills are payable in advance at the beginning of 
each semester, namely, in September and February. 

A refund will be allowed only in case of serious 
sickness, necessitating absence from the College for a 
period exceeding a month, and this only for board and 
lodging. Late attendance, dismissal and withdrawal 
being serious inconveniences to the College, contracts are 
made for semesters, and not for shorter periods. 

When parents desire the College to pay for clothing, 
traveling, dentistry, etc., they should either make the ini- 
tial deposit large enough to cover these expenses, or for- 
ward to the Treasurer the amount required for such 
purposes. 



20 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

No advance will be made beyond this deposit. 

Books and stationery are furnished by the College 
at the expense of parents. 

The College will not be responsible for books, cloth- 
ing, jewelry, or any other articles left by any student 
when departing from the College ; much less for the loss 
of books, clothing, jewelry or money while in the keep- 
ing of the owner during the school year. 

No student will be admitted to examination or grant- 
ed a degree until all indebtedness to the College is settled. 



CATALOGUE 21 



Admission 



PREPARATION 

Academic preparation, as secured by the completion 
of four years of a standard high school is essential to a 
student who wishes to enter college. Inquiry into the 
causes of failure in college classes makes it but too appar- 
ent that the chief of these causes is lack of preparation ; 
and many applicants, who have had good school oppor- 
tunities, are found to be particularly deficient in their 
knowledge of preparatory mathematics and in their abil- 
ity to use the English language. A thorough working 
knowledge, therefore, of the preparatory subjects is ab- 
solutely necessary in order to begin and carry on success- 
fully the prescribed work of the College, and it is mani- 
festly unfair to the applicant himself to admit him to 
college unless he has had sufficient preparation. The 
college classes begin where the preparatory work of the 
high school leaves off, and there is no opportunity after 
entering college to make up those deficiencies which a 
student may have incurred in his preparation. 

TESTIMONIALS 

All applicants for admission must present satisfac- 
tory testimonials of good moral character. 

CREDENTIALS 

The College requires for admission the satisfactory 
completion of a four-year course in a secondary school 
approved by a recognized accrediting agency or the 
equivalent of such a course. The major portion of the 
secondary school course, presented by a student for ad- 
mission, should be definitely correlated with the curricu- 
lum to which he seeks admission ; in other words, all can- 
didates for admission to Freshman year must present 
fifteen units in acceptable subjects. A unit represents a 
year's study in any subject, constituting approximately 



22 SPRIN G HILL COLLEGE 

a quarter of a full year's work. This definition of a unit 
takes the four-year high school as a basis and assumes 
that the length of the school year is from thirty-six to 
forty weeks, that a period is from forty-five to sixty min- 
utes in length, and that the study is pursued for four or 
five periods a week. 

No student will be admitted except on presentation 
of an official transcript of credits from the high school 
last attended. Credentials which are accepted for admis- 
sion become the property of the College. 

METHODS OF ADMISSION 

Candidates are admitted either on certificate or by 
examination. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

Admission by certificate is granted applicants from 
all schools on the approved list of the Commission on 
Accredited Schools of the Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools of the Southern States and of other 
recognized accrediting agencies outside the territory em- 
braced by the Southern Association. 

Blank forms of entrance certificates, which are to 
be used in every case, may be had on application to the 
Registrar. Certificates must be made out and signed by 
the Principal or other recognized officer of the school, 
and mailed by him directly to the Registrar. It is ex- 
pected that the Principal will not recommend all grad- 
uates, but only those whose ability, application and schol- 
arship are such that the school is willing to stand sponsor 
for their success in College. 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

Applicants who are not entitled to admission by cer- 
tificate must take examinations in the required entrance 
units. These examinations are held during the week pre- 
ceding the opening of classes. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students applying for admission from standard in- 
stitutions of collegiate rank will be given advanced stand- 
ing provided the credits of the institution are acceptable 



CATALOGUE 23 



and sufficient to be considered equivalent to the work 
done in the corresponding classes at Spring Hill. 

Such candidates should present in advance of regis- 
tration : 

1. A certificate of honorable dismissal from the 
school last attended. 

2. An official transcript of college credits, with 
specifications of courses, year when taken, hours and 
grades. 

3. An official certified statement of college en- 
trance credits, showing the length of each course in 
weeks the number of recitations and laboratory exercises 
each week, the length of recitation periods, and the 
mark earned. 

No student will be admitted to the College as a can- 
didate for a degree after the first semester of the Senior 
year. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Mature and earnest students, who either are lacking 
in the required units or wish to pursue particular studies 
without reference to graduation, may be admitted by the 
permission of the Dean to such course of their own choice 
as they seem qualified to take. The work done by these 
students cannot be counted later on toward a degree at 
Spring Hill unless all entrance requirements have been 
satisfied. 

PRESCRIBED UNITS FOR REGULAR COURSES 

FOR THE A. B. COURSE 

English 3 units Greek* or Mod. Lang... 2 units 

Mathematics 3 units History 1 unit 

Latin 4 units Science 1 unit 

FOR THE B. S. COURSE 

English 3 units History 1 unit 

Mathematics 3 units Science. 1 unit 

Foreign Language 2 units 

FOR THE B. S. IN COMMERCE COURSE 

English 3 units One foreign language.. 2 units 

Mathematics 2% units Bookkeeping 1 unit 

History 1 unit 

•Provisions made for those who have not the prescribed units in Greek. 



24 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

The remaining units may be selected from subjects 
counted toward graduation in an accredited or recog- 
nized high school, with the following restrictions: 

1. No subject may be presented for less than a half 
unit of credit. 

2. Not more than one unit, counted towards grad- 
uation by an accredited high school, will be accepted in 
a vocational or commercial subject. 



CATALOGUE 25 



Degrees 



The College confers the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Science in Com- 
merce, following the satisfactory completion of the four- 
year courses enjoined by the Faculty on the candidates 
for these degrees. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

(a) AMOUNT OF WORK 

In order to receive a degree, a student is required to complete 
one hundred and twenty-eight semester hours of work and to main- 
tain a minimum grade of 70. 

The requirements for graduation include: 

1. A certain amount of prescribed work, especially during the 
Freshman and Sophomore years. 

2. A major and minor, to be taken chiefly during the Junior 
and Senior years. 

3. Approved electives, which afford opportunity for broader 
culture or for greater specialization, as the student may choose. 

4. At least the Senior year in residence at Spring Hill College. 

5. A written thesis approved by the Dean of the College and 
presented on or before May 1 of the year in which the degree is 
expected to be conferred. 

6. All work in order to be accepted in fulfilment of any re- 
quirement for the degree must be completed with grade 70-80 or 
over. 

7. A fee of fifteen dollarSj payable in advance. 

All applicants for degrees should file their application and pre- 
sent all their credits on or before the first of April. 

The semester hour is the unit or standard for computing the 
amount of a student's work. A semester hour is defined as one lec- 
ture, recitation or class exercise, one hour in length per week, for 
one semester. Two hours of laboratory work are equivalent to one 
recitation hour. Two hours of preparation on the part of the stu- 
dent is required for each hour of lecture or recitation. 

The normal load is sixteen semester hours plus two in religion. 
Where specific combinations require it, work amounting to seventeen 
semester hours plus two religion will be permitted. A load of eight- 
een semester hours plus two in religion is the maximum, and no 



12618S 



26 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

student who has failed in any course at Spring Hill College will be 
allowed to carry the maximum load. 

(b) QUALITY OF WORK 

The average of the monthly written tests counts for one half 
of the semester grade and the semester examination the other half. 

Credits are not given for average grades, but only when every 
test and examination has 70 for a minimum. 

The percentage system is used in giving grades, 70 per cent 
being required for passing. In addition to Quantity credits, which 
are given upon completing the courses with a grade of 70 per cent 
or more, Quality points are allowed according to the quality of work 
done. A grade of 75 to 84 gives the student one Quality credit for 
each Quantity credit; a grade of 85 to 94 gives him two Quality 
credits for each Quantity credit; and a grade of 95 to 100 gives 
him three Quality credits for each Quantity credit. Quality credits 
are computed from the year-grade of the student. 

These grades are not given out to the students by the prof esso^ 
but are regularly issued from the office of the Dean of the College. 

Candidates for degrees must attend any course of lectures or 
any other exercises, that have been or may be equipped and required 
by the Faculty, even though such courses receive no value in credits. 

MAJOR AND MINOR SEQUENCE 

There must be completed a Major Sequence of at least twenty- 
four hours in some subject (or in the discretion of the Professor 
concerned and with the approval of the Dean, in some closely related 
group of subjects) and a Minor Sequence of at least eighteen hours. 

A major may be changed only by the consent of the Dean and 
the heads of the departments concerned, and such change will be 
permitted only upon the distinct understanding that all the courses 
prescribed in the major finally chosen shall be completed before 
graduation. 

ELECTIVES 

Courses (a) not taken as prescribed courses, and (b) not in- 
cluded in the student's major and minor may be chosen as approved 
electives to complete the 128 credits required for graduation. 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 27 



In the choice of electives, each student must be guided by his 
prospective future work. He must ascertain, moreover that such 
courses are open to his class; that he has fulfilled the prerequisites, 
and that there will be no conflict in the schedule of recitations or 
laboratory periods. 

Students, who offer French or Spanish as an entrance require- 
ment, will not receive credit toward graduation for French I or 
Spanish I, taken in College. 

Two years must be completed in a foreign language before it is 
accepted for a credit toward a degree. 

Electives for the second term must be filed by members of 
the upper classes with the Dean on or before January 5, and for the 
first term on or before May 15. 

REFERENCE STUDY AND RESEARCH 

1. Students taking courses in Philosophy shall prepare and 
submit each month a paper of 2,000 words dealing with the devel- 
opment of some specific topic of the subject-matter treated in class. 

2. Students taking courses in Education, History and Social 
Sciences will be required to hand in two papers each semester. 
These papers are to contain not less than 1,800 words; and at least 
one of the four papers thus submitted during the year should give 
unmistakable signs of original research. 

3. All such and other prescribed written assignments will be 
held to strictly as pre-requirements for graduation, for the fulfil- 
ment of which no student will be allowed any extension of time be- 
yond the 5th of May of his Senior year. 



28 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Schedule of A. B. Course 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek or Mod. Lang... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek or Mod. Lang... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek or Mod. Lang... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

History 3 hours 

Introd. to Phil 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek or Mod. Lang... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

History 3 hours 

Introd. to Phil 2 hours 



JUNIOR 



First Semester — 

Philosophy 4 hours 

Approved Electives ..10 hours 



Second Semester — 
Philosophy 4 hours 

Approved Electives ..10 hours 



SENIOR 



First Semester — 

Philosophy 8 hours 

Approved Electives .. 7 hours 



Second Semester — 

Philosophy 8 hours 

Approved Electives .. 7 hours 



CATALOGUE 



29 



Schedule of B. S. Course 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester- 
English 8 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Drawing 2 hours 



Second Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Drawing 2 hours 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester — 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 5 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Introd. to Phil 1 hour 

History 3 hours 



Second Semester — 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 5 hours 

Introd. to Phil 2 hours 

History 3 hours 



JUNIOR 



First Semester — 

Science 4 hours 

Philosophy 4 hours 

Approved Electives .... 7 hours 



Second Semester — 

Science 4 hours 

Philosophy 4 hours 

Approved Electives .... 7 hours 



SENIOR 



First Semester — 

Science 4 hours 

Philosophy 6 hours 

Approved Electives .... 6 hours 



Second Semester — 

Science 4 hours 

Philosophy 4 hours 

Approved Electives .... 8 hours 



30 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Schedule of 
Engineering Course 



First Semester — 

Mathematics 3 

Language 3 

Chemistry 4 

Drawing 4 

English 3 

Public Speaking 1 

Physical Education % 

First Semester — 

Mathematics 5 

Physics 4 

Descriptive Geometry 4 

English 3 

Language 3 

Physical Education .... Va 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester — 
hours Mathematics, 4 or 8.— 3 hours 

hours Language 3 hours 

hours Chemistry 4 hours 

hours Drawing 2 hours 

Descriptive Geometry.. 2 hours 

hours English 3 hours 

hour Public Speaking 1 hour 

hour Physical Education .... % hour 

SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester — 

hours Mathematics 5 hours 

hours Physics 4 hours 

hours Drawing '. 4 hours 

hours English 3 hours 

hours Language 3 hours 

hour Physical Education ....% hour 



SCHEDULE OF PRE-LEGAL COURSE 



First Semester — 

Mathematics 3 

Law Latin 3 

Language 3 

Chemistry 4 

English 3 

Public Speaking 1 

First Semester — 

History 3 

Language 3 

Introd. to Phil 1 

Psychology 2 

Sociology 2 

English 3 

Public Speaking 1 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester — 

hours Mathematics 3 hours 

hours Law Latin 3 hours 

hours Language 3 hours 

hours Chemistry 4 hours 

hours English 3 hours 

hour Public Speaking 1 hour 

SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester — 

hours History 3 hours 

hours Language 3 hours 

hour Introd. to Phil 2 hours 

hours Special Metaphysics .. 2 hours 

hours Sociology 2 hours 

hours English 3 hours 

hour 



CATALOGUE 



31 



Schedule of Pre-Medical Courses 



Two -Year Pre-Medical Course 

FIRST YEAR 



First Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry ~ 4 hours 
♦Modern Language .... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Sscond Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry .. 4 hours 
♦Modern Language .... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



SECOND YEAR 



First Semester — 
Comparative Anatomy 4 hours 
Organic Chemistry .... 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Physics 4 hours 

♦Modern Lanugage .... 3 hours 



Sscond Semester — 

Quantitative Chem. .. 4 hours 

Organic Chemistry .... 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Physics 4 hours 

♦Modern Lanugage .... 3 hours 



Three- Year Pre-Medical Course 



FIRST and SECOND YEARS same as TWO-YEAR PRE-MEDICAL 

COURSE 

THIRD YEAR 



First Semester — 

Genetics 2 hours 

Physical Chemistry .... 4 hours 

Philosophy 4 hours 

History 3 hours 

Electives 4 hours 



Second Semester — 
Embryology 4 hours 

Philosophy 4 hours 

History 3 hours 

Electives 6 hours 



B. S. In Biology 

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology may be obtained 
by completing the requirements for a major in this subject and the 
additional hours to make up the necessary 128. The following 
courses will be offered for this purpose. 



♦Only French or German will be accepted for the B. S. in 
Biology. 



32 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Semester — 

Histology 4 hours 

Philosophy 6 hours 

Sociology 2 hours 



Second Semester — 
Introd. to General 

Physiology 4 hours 

Philosophy 6 hours 

Sociology 2 hours 



Schedule of 
Pre-Dental Course 



First Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry ~ 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mod. Language 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Sscond Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry .. 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mod. Language 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Dental Schools accept High School Physics for credit. In this 
case a modern language may usefully be substituted for it in college. 



CATALOGUE 33 



Remarks on Regular Courses 



The A.B. Course. 

This course is unexcelled as a preparation for a profession and 
for general culture. By a proper choice of electives, a student 
may include in his schedule Pre-Legal, Pre-Medical or Engineering 
studies, and thus be able to obtain his A. B. Degree with all the 
requirements for entrance into a professional school in four years. 

The B.S. Course. 

The object of this course is to prepare students for a career 
in some technical profession. Those who finish this course are 
entitled to advanced standing in the university courses, and thus 
they are enabled to obtain their B.S. Degree and make their pro- 
fessional studies in the least possible time. Students in this course 
may cover all the Pre-Medical or Pre-Legal requirements. In the 
B. S. course more time is devoted to Sciences, and Modern Lan- 
guages take the place of the Classics. 

The B.S. In Commerce Course. 

This course is designed to meet the demands of those who 
wish to combine a cultural education with the technical courses 
required for a business career. It embraces such subjects as Ac- 
counting, Commercial Law, Economics, Banking, Marketing, Pro- 
duction, Finance, English, Mathematics, and Modern Language, 
but also affords an opportunity for courses in History and Schol- 
astic Philosophy. 

A two-year course in business subjects will be arranged for 
those who do not wish to take on the four-year course. 

The Engineering Course. 

This course is practically the same as the first two years of 
the B.S. course. It embraces the subjects that are generally 
required as the foundation of all technical engineering courses. 

The Pre-Legal Course. 

The best preparation for entering upon the study of law is 
a four-year course leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science. However, those wishing to take a two-yeai 
course, which will afterward be counted toward a degree, should 
communicate with the institution at which they intend to make 
their law studies to find out what it advises as a Pre-Legal course. 
In general, any two years of a standard course leading to degrees 
answer the purpose of a Pre-Legal course. 



34 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

The Pre-Medical Course. 

Due to the large number of applicants for medical education in 
recent years and to the continual raising of the standards by med- 
ical schools throughout the country, pre-medical students are strongly 
urged to take the full four years of college work in preparation for 
the study of medicine. With this in view a four-year course, leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Biology, has been worked 
out and is recommended for those who intend to study medicine. 
For those, who cannot spend this much time in undergraduate work, 
the first three years of the above course is admirably adapted to 
prepare them for medical school. Finally, for those who are satis- 
fied to meet only the minimum requirements of some medical schools, 
the first two years of the same course is obligatory. 

With respect to this course the following excerpt from the 
annual report on "Medical Education in the United States" pre- 
pared by the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals (Jour. 
Amer. Med. Ass'n., Vol. 97 (9), p. 611, Aug. 29, 1931) will make 
plain what the minimum requirements for admission to the accept- 
able medical schools are. 

"II. Pre-medical College Course. The minimum requirement 
for admission to acceptable medical schools, in addition to the high 
school work specified above ( a four-year course of at least fifteen 
units in a standard accredited high school or other institution of 
standard secondary school grade), will be sixty semester hours of 
collegiate work, exclusive of military and physical education, extend- 
ing through two years, of thirty-two weeks each, exclusive of holidays, 
in a college approved by the Council of Medical Education and Hos- 
pitals*. The subjects included in the two years of college work, 
should be in accordance with the following schedule. 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS OF THE TWO-YEAR PRE-MEDICAL 
COLLEGE COURSE 
Required Subjects: Semester Hours 

Chemistry (a) 12 

Physics (b) 8 

Biology (c) 8 

English Composition and Literature (d) 6 

Other Non-Science Subjects (e) 12 

Subjects Strongly Urged: 

A Modern Foreign Language (f) 6-12 

Advanced Botany or Advanced Zoology 3-6 

Psychology and Logic 3-6 

* Spring Hill College is so approved. Cf. J. A. M. A., 97, p. 612. 



CATALOGUE 35 



Advanced Mathematics, including Algebra and Trigonometry 3-6 

Additional Courses in Chemistry 3-6 

Other Suggested Electives : 
English] (additional), Economics, History, Sociology, Political 

Science, Mathematics, Latin, Greek, Drawing. 

Suggestions Regarding Individual Subjects: 

(a) Chemistry. 

Twelve semester hours required of which at least eight semes- 
ter hours must be in General Inorganic Chemistry, including four 
semester hours of laboratory work, and four semester hours in 
Organic Chemistry, including two semester hours of laboratory 
work. In the interpretation of this rule, work in qualitative analysis 
may be counted as General Inorganic Chemistry. 

(b) Physics. 

Eight semester hours required, of which at least two must be 
in laboratory work. It is urged that this course be preceded by a 
course in Trigonometry. 

(c) Biology. 

Eight semester hours required, of which four must consist of 
laboratory work. This requirement may be satisfied by a course of 
four semester hours each in Zoology and Botany, but not by Botany 
alone. 

(d) English Composition and Literature. 

The usual introductory college course of six semester hours, 
or its equivalent, is required. 

(e) Non-Science Subjects. 

Of the sixty semester hours required as the measurement of 
two years of college work, at least eighteen, including the six semes- 
ter hours of English, should be in subjects other than the Physical, 
Chemical or Biological Sciences. 

(f) Foreign Language*. 

A reading knowledge of a modern foreign language is strongly 
urged. If the reading knowledge of this language is obtained on the 
basis of high school work, the student is urged to take another lan- 
guage in his college course. It is not considered advisable, however, 
to spend more than twelve of the required sixty semester hours on 
foreign languages. 

(g) In General. 

This Pre-Medical Course in both quantity and quality must be 
such as to make it acceptable as the equivalent of the first two 
years of the course in reputable, approved colleges of arts and 
science leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science." 

*Most medical schools specify French or German as the mod- 
ern foreign language required. 



36 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Subjects in Course 

DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

The Faculty reserves the right to refuse to offer a 
course listed below for which there is not a sufficient 
number of applicants. 

ASTRONOMY 

401. Descriptive Astronomy. 

Fundamental astronomical facts and principal astronomical co- 
ordinates, the celestial sphere. Astronomical instruments. The sun, 
moon and eclipses. The planets, comets, meteors. Constellations, 
clusters and nebulae. Three hours credit. 

402. Spherical and Practical Astronomy. 

The theory and use of astronomical instruments, such as the 
sextant, transit, altazimuth, equatorial, position micrometer, spec- 
troscope, etc. Computation of eclipses, construction of eclipse 
maps. Introduction to celestial machines. Orbits of planets and 
satellites. Three hours credit. 

BIOLOGY 
LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. General Biology. 

An introductory course consisting of an outline of the physical 
structure and chemical composition of protoplasm and the cell, 
the morphology and physiology of plant and invertebrate animal 
types. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

Given in 1931-32; to be given in 1932-33. 

201. Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. 

A comparative study of type forms with special reference to 
Analogy and Homology. Prerequisite Biology 101-102. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
One semester. Four hours credit. 

Given in 1931-32; to be given in 1933. 

202. Genetics. 

A survey course of the facts and theories of heredity and vari- 
ation. Prerequisite Biology 101-102. 
Lectures two hours per week. 
One semester. Two hours credit. 






CATALOGUE 37 



Given in 1932. 

203. Vertebrate Embryology. 

A study of Gametogenesis, Fertilization, Cleavage, Gastrula- 
tion and Later Development of Typical Vertebrate Forms. 
Prerequisite Biology 101-102. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
One semester. Four hours credit. 

To be given in 1932-33. 

204. Microscopic Technique. 

A laboratory course in the Methods of Preparing Tissues for 
Microscopical Study. Restricted to a few select students. Pre- 
requisite Biology 101-102, 202 or 203 and Chemistry 101-102. 

Four hours per week. Two hours credit. 

Given in 1932; to be given in 1932-33. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

These courses are intended primarily for students majoring in 
Biology and are open for credit ordinarily only to Juniors and 
Seniors. 

301. Histology. 

A study of cells and fundamental tissues. Prerequisites 
Biology 101-102, 202 or 203. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
One semester. Four hours credit. 

302. Bacteriology. 

A course dealing with the morphology,, classification, physi- 
ology and cultivation of bacteria; the relation of bacteria to the 
health of man and animals; and the principles of immunity. Pre- 
requisites Biology 101-102 and Chemistry 101-102. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

401. Introduction To General Physiology. 

A study of matter and energy in relation to living things; solu- 
tions; diffusion and osmotic pressure; the physico-chemical struc- 
ture of protoplasm. Prerequisites Biology 101-102,201, 203; Chem- 
istry 101-2, 202, 301. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 



38 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

402. General Physiology. 

The fundamental life processes of organisms from a general 
and comparative viewpoint. Prerequisites Biology 401 and Chem- 
istry 203-4, 301, 305-6. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

403. History of Biology. 

A review of the principal figures, theories and discoveries which 
have contributed to the development of the science of biology. 
Prerequisite Biology 101-102. 

Lecture one hour per week. 

One semester. One hour credit. 

404. Introduction To Research. 

Special work for advanced students and preparation of thesis. 

Credit to be arranged. 

Mendel Club. 

This club is composed of the staff and students majoring in 
Biology, as well as others interested in the subject. The work of 
the club consists in the reading and discussion of papers on biological 
subjects by the members and invited lecturers. 

One hour per alternate week. 

Two semesters. One hour credit for Juniors and Seniors. 

CHEMISTRY 

101. General Inorganic Chemistry. 

This course is intended to familiarize the student with the fun- 
damental principles of chemical theory. The principles are devel- 
oped and driven home by illustrations, exercises and problems. 
Since the chemistry of the laboratory is the true chemistry, the 
whole course is arranged about it and is made to carry the thread 
of the subject. Four hours credit. 

102. Elementary Qualitative Analysis. 

In this course an endeavor is made to impress upon the student 
the principles involved, and to enable him to classify chemical phe- 
nomena, avoiding mere thoughtless manipulation. Special emphasis 
is laid on the development of the ionic theory and theories of 
Solution. Four hours credit. 

201. Qualitative Analysis. 

A development of Course 2. In close connection with the lab- 
oratory work covering analytical reactions, a thorough study is made 
of the fundamental general principles. This course brings the stu- 



CATALOGUE 39 



dent into closer touch with such topics as chemical equilibrium, 
"Mass Law," solubility product, etc. Four hours credit. 

202. Quantitative Analysis. 

This course includes the elements of gravimetric and volumetric 
analysis with typical analytical methods. The laboratory work is 
supplemented by conferences and quizzes, the important principles 
of stoichiometry being especially emphasized. Four hours credit. 

203-4. Organic Chemistry. 

The principles of Organic Chemistry and its relation to Gen- 
eral Chemistry are emphasized. Typical organic compounds are 
studied, and their constitution is discussed at some length. General 
reactions and characteristics are discussed, and many applications 
of Organic Chemistry to practical life are given. 

Eight hours credit. 

301. — Physical Chemistry. 

This course is intended to familiarize intending students of 
Medicine and Engineering with the fundamental principles of Chemical 
Theory. The structure of matter, thermodynamics and electrochem- 
istry, are treated as fully as possible. Laboratory work includes the 
different methods of molecular weight determination, electrical con- 
ductance and the determination of Hydrogen-ion concentration, 
colorimetrically ad electrometrically. 

Four hours credit. 

302. Materials of Engineering Products. 

A brief course in the elements of qualitative analysis stressing 
analytical actions, separations and identifications in the light of 
modern theories of ionic solutions and equilibria. Analysis of iron, 
steel, certain alloys and commercial products are made with special 
determination of iron, lead, zinc and copper ores. 

Four hours credit. 

303-4. Material of Engineering Products. 

A brief course in the elements of quantitative analysis stressing 
gravimetric determinations of iron, sulphur and chlorine to enable 
the student to acquire speed, accuracy and confidence. Volumetric 
analysis is then taken up with emphasis being placed on commercial 
products and practical methods as determined in a modern industrial 
laboratory. Eight hours credit. 

305-6. — Physiological Chemistry. 

An elementary course dealing with the Chemistry of the Carbo- 
hydrates, fats and proteins. The chemical basis underlying the phe- 
nomena of metabolism; enzymes, absorption and digestion are dis- 
cussed. 

Eight hours credit. 



40 SPRING HILL COLLEG E 

N. B. Chemistry 101, 102, 301, 202 are required of Engineering 
students. 

Chemistry 201, 302, 303 and 304 are recommended for Engi- 
neering students. 

Chemistry 101, 102, 203 and 204 are required of Pre-Medi- 
cal students. 

Chemistry 301 and 202 are recommended for Pre-Medical 
students and required by many medical schools. 

DRAWING 

101-2. Mechanical Drawing. 

Lettering, tracing, blue-printing, geometrical construction, 
orthographic and oblique projection, exercises in drawing to scale, 
intersections and development of surfaces. Working drawings of 
machine parts and of complete machines and structures, dimension- 
ing, line-shading. One Semester and a half. Six hours credit. 

106-201. — Descriptive Geometry. 

A critical study of the science of drawing. The location of 
points, lines, planes; single-curved surfaces; surfaces of revolution 
and warped surfaces, with their relations to each other; tangent lines 
and planes; intersection of surfaces; shades and shadows. One se- 
mester and a half. Prerequisite, Solid Geometry. Six hours credit. 

205. Topographical Drawing. 
Shades and shadows, representation of surface forms by contours 
and by shading with pencil, pen and colors. Topographical symbols, 
copying, enlarging and reducing maps. Two hours credit. 

202. Machine Drawing. 

Free-hand and mechanical drawing of machine parts and com- 
plete machines, piping plans, etc., with problems in mechanism and 
in machine design. Four hours credit. 

103-4. Anatomical Drawing. 

An elective course for pre-medical students, calculated to im- 
print graphically upon the mind an accurate theoretical knowledge 
of the construction of the human body. The skeleton, nervous sys- 
tem and various organs form the basis of study. 

Four hours credit. 

204. Architectural Drawing. 

An elective course for those students anticipating the study of 
architecture to be taken the second Semester of the Sophomore 
year. 

The fundamental principles underlying architectural construe- 



CATALOGUE 41 



tion with special stress being laid upon orthographic details of 
moldings, balustrades, facades, doors, windows and domes. 

Three hours lecture per week. 

204-A. Architectural Drawing. 

A laboratory course for those students taking Drawing 204. 
Practical application of principles studied entailing the reproduction 
of the outstanding examples of ancient and modern architectural de- 
tails. Eight hours laboratory per week. 

301. Architectural Design. 

A study of architectural models stressing the method of ren- 
dering and sketching in pencil and charcoal. 

Two hours lecture per week. 
301 -A. Architectural Design. 

Laboratory course in connection with Drawing 301. 

Six hours laboratory per week. 

302. Architectural Design. 

Study of the architecture of the Renaissance of Italy, France 
and England and early American architecture. 

Three hours lecture per week. 
302-A. Architecture Design. 
Laboratory course in connection with Drawing 302. 

ECONOMICS 

Courses as outlined under Department of Commerce. 

EDUCATION 

Courses as outlined under department of Education. 

ENGLISH 
1. Rhetoric and Composition. 

A course in the essentials of rhetoric and in the various modes 
of composition. Required of Freshman students who are deficient 
in the theory or practice of correct English. 

101. Advanced Rhetoric. 

A course in the theory of rhetoric and the study of style based 
on reading, analysis and discussion of works of English prose au- 
thors. Insistence on the principles of literature and frequent prac- 
tice in composition. Required of Freshmen. 

Three hours credit. 

102. Poetry. 

A course in the study of the nature and elements of poetry, 
principles of versification, its various kinds, etc. Reading, analysis 
and appreciation of the chief poets, partly in class study, partly in 
assignments. Frequent practice in composition. Required of Fresh- 
men. Three hours credit. 



42 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

201. Oratory. 

The theory of oratory; analysis and study of oratorical mas- 
terpieces. The preparation of briefs, the composition and delivery 
of short addresses, speeches for occasions, debates, and at least two 
formal orations will be required. Required of Sophomore. 

Three hours credit. 

202. The Drama. 

The theory of the drama will be studied by means of lectures 
and assignments in its history and development; reading, analysis 
and study of works of principal English dramatists, especially 
Shakespeare; composition in dialogue, dramatic sketches, playlets, 
and at least one complete drama will be required. Required of 
Sophomore. Three hours credit. 

301. The English Novel. 

The principal purpose of this course is to study the technique 
of the novel and the various schools of fiction and their tendencies 
with special attention to their ethical and literary value. Reading 
and discussion of noted novels. Three hours credit. 

302. Shakespeare. 

Shakespeare's life, influence, sources of his drama; an acquain- 
tance by reading and assignments with the Shakespearean literature 
of criticism; reading, analysis and study of Shakespeare's plays, 
especially in comparison with those of other dramatists. 

Three hours credit. 

303. Aesthetics and Literary Criticism. 

The philosophical basis of aesthetics, the elements of taste; the 
theory of criticism; a survey of critical standards; a study of the 
schools of criticism and of the work of the chief literary critics. 
Critical papers of assigned subjects will be required. 

Three hours credit. 

304. The Essay. 

The nature of the essay; the artistic and didactic types, and 
their various forms; the characteristics of each. An historical sur- 
vey of the essay with a brief study of the work of the chief essay- 
ists. Newman will receive special attention. Composition in the 
various forms of the essay will be required. 

Three hours credit. 

401-2. Journalism. 

Ethics of journalism; a brief survey of the history of journal- 
ism, its development, and a discussion of its present tendencies. The 
technology of the pressroom, news gathering and reporting; prepara- 



CATALOGUE 43 



tion of copy; copy-reading, proof-reading, interviewing and editing. 
Field work will be required and co-operation with the college period- 
icals. Six hours credit. 

305-6. English and American Literature. 

Lectures on the History of English and American literature 
based on Carver and Brother Leo. Six hours credit. 

EVIDENCES OF RELIGION 

101. Christian Revelation; the Church. 

Revelation in general; Christianity a revealed religion; Pa- 
triarchal and Mosaic Revelation; divine origin of the Christian Reve- 
lation. The Church; its institution and end; Constitution of the 
Church. Two hours credit. 

102. The Church; God and Salvation. 

Marks and Teaching Office of the Church; Holy Scripture and 
Tradition; the rule of Faith. God the Author and Restorer of our 
salvation; God considered in Himself; One in Nature; His Existence, 
Nature, Attributes, Unity; the Trinity. Two hours credit. 

201. Creation and Redemption. 

Creation; the spiritual world; the material world. Man and the 
Fall. God the Redeemer; the Person and Nature of the Redeemer; 
the work of Redemption. Two hours credit. 

202. Grace and the Sacraments. 

Actual, habitual and sanctifying grace; infused and acquired 
virtues; Pelagianism, Jansenism, Naturalism ? and other errors re- 
futed. The Sacraments in general; Baptism; Confirmation; the Holy 
Eucharist as a Sacrament and as a Sacrifice. 

Two hours credit. 

301. The Sacraments; Morality and Virtue; Eschatology. 

The Sacraments of Penance, Extreme Unction, Holy Orders and 
Matrimony; Sacramentary errors refuted. The basis of morality; 
law, conscience and free will; moral good and moral evil, Th« 
Christian's duties toward God; natural and supernatural virtues; 
Faith, Hope and Charity; the Last Things. Two hours credit. 

302. Divine Worship; Christian Perfection. 

Internal and external worship due to God; direct and indirect 
acts of worship; veneration of the Saints. The Christian's duties 
toward self and neighbor; works of supererogation. 

Two hours credit. 

401. Sacred Scripture. 

Biblical canonics and Hermeneutics. Facts, nature and extent 



44 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

of inspiration. The Bible and Science. Explanation of difficulties 
drawn from geology, astronomy, biology, paleontology and evolution. 

Two hours credit. 

402. Scripture Reading; Ecclesiastical History. 

Readings from the Old and New Testaments. Study of princi- 
pal epochs in the history of the Church. Discussion of historical dif- 
ficulties and difficulties drawn from misconception of Catholic doc- 
trine. Two hours credit. 

FRENCH 

101. Elementary French. 

Careful drill in punctuating. The rudiments of grammar, in- 
cluding the inflection of the regular and more common irregular 
verbs; the order of words in the sentence; colloquial exercises; writ- 
ing French from dictation; easy themes; conversation. First semes- 
ter. Three hours credit. 

102. Elementary French (Continued). 

Mastery of irregular verb forms;- uses of the conditional sub- 
junctive; syntax. Reading of graduated texts, with constant practice 
in translating into French portions of the text read; dictation, con- 
versation. Three hours credit. 

201. Intermediate French. 

Reading, conversation, prose composition, letter-writing. Re- 
view of French syntax. Prerequisite : French 1 and 2 or equivalents. 
Reading: Bruno, Sarcey, Le Siege de Paris; Renard, Trois Contes de 
Noel. Three hours credit. 

202. Intermediate French (Continued). 

Grammar review, with special attention to problems in syntax. 
Detailed written abstracts of texts read. Letter-writing. Conversa- 
tion. Reading: Fortier, Napoleon; Chateaubriand, Les Adventures 
Du Dernier Abencerage. Three hours credit. 

301. Modern French Prose. 

The study of novels or short stories by modern French prose 
writers: Erckmann-Chatrian, Bazin, Chauteaubriand and others. 
Grammar and composition based on a French text. 

Three hours credit. 

302. French Poetry of the Nineteenth Century. 

Readings from Alfred de Vigny, Alfred de Musset, Lamartine 
and others, with an introduction to French versification. Selections 
committed to memory. 



CATALOGUE 45 



401. French Oratory. 

A study of the French orators and their work ; Bossuet, Bour- 
daloue, Massillon, Flechier; prose composition; private reading. 

402. The French Drama. 

The reading of dramas chosen from such authors as Corneille, 
Moliere, Racine, together with a study of their lives and works. 

Three hours credit. 

GERMAN 

101. Elementary German. 

This course is intended for students who have not presented 
German for admission. Grammar, pronunciation, colloquial exer- 
cise, easy themes, translation from prose selections. 

Three hours credit. 

102. Elementary German (Continued). 

Weak and strong verbs, the use of the model auxiliaries; the 
chief rules ol syntax and word-order; selections in prose and verse; 
dictation based upon the readings; frequent short themes; conver- 
sation; memorizing of poems. Readings: Baumbach, Der Schwieg- 
ersohn; Storm, Immensee; Arnold, Fritz and Ferien; Wildenbruch, 
Das Edle Blut. Three hours credit. 

201. Intermediate German. 

Rapid review of grammar; dictation; prose composition. Open 
to students who have credit for German 101 and 102, or who have 
presented elementary German for admission. First semester. 

Three hours credit. 

202. Intermediate German (Continued). 

The more difficult problems of syntax; special problems of 
grammar. Reading of selected texts. Dictation and themes based 
upon the reading. Memorizing of poems. Second semester. Read- 
ings: Schiller, William Tell; Goethe, Herma and Dorothea and 
Iphigene; Uhland's Poems. Three hours credit. 

301. German Prose Writers. 

The study of novels or short stories by German prose writers; 
Freytag, Hauff, Herbert, Stifter, Novalis, Brentano, Eichendorff. 

Three hours credit. 

302. German Poetry. 

Readings from German ballads and lyrics. Selections com- 
mitted to memory. Three hours credit. 

401-2. The German Epic. 

Dreizehnlinden, Weber; Der Trumpeter von Sakkingen, Schef- 
fel; selections from other epic poems. Six hours credit. 



46 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

GREEK 
1. For Beginners. 

Grammar and Composition. Xenophon, Anabasis, I. Required 
of those who do not offer Greek for entrance. 

Three hours a week for one semester. 

2. Xenophon. 

Anabasis, II-III; New Testament, St. Luke's Gospel; Grammar 
and Composition. Required of those who do not offer Greek for 
entrance. Three hours a week for one semester. 

101. Homer. 

The Iliad, I-IV, selections; or Odyssey, selections. Euripides, 
Iphigenia in Aulis, Medea, Hecuba; Aristophanes, Clouds. Sight 
reading; Xenophon, Cyropaedia. Grammar and composition based 
on Arnold. Three hours credit. 

102. Homer. 

The Odyssey, selections; Theocritus, selections; Pindar, Olym- 
pic Odes, selected; sight reading, New Testament, selections. Gram- 
mar review and composition based on Arnold. 

Three hours credit. 

201. Demosthenes. 

On the Crown; selections from St. John Chrysostom and St. 
Basil; studies and oratorical analysis. Grammar review and com- 
position based on Arnold. Three hours credit. 

202. Demosthenes. Aeschylus. 

Demosthenes, Philippics or Olynthiacs; oratorical analysis; 
Aeschylus ? Agammemnon. Grammar review and composition based 
on Arnold. Three hours credit. 

301. Plato. 

Crito, Phaedo. Apology. Three hours credit. 

302. Herodotus, Thucydides. 

Herodotus, selections from Books I-IV.; Thucydides, selections 
from the Sicilian expedition. Three hours credit. 

401. Sophocles. 

Antigone, Oedipus Tyrannus, Oedipus Coloneus. 

Three hours credit. 

402. Aristophanes. 

The Wasps, the Birds, the Frogs. Three hours credit. 

HISTORY 
101. Early Medieval History. 

Migration of Nations. The Islam, the Franks, the Lombards, 
and the Holy See. Church and State. The Carolingians. The 



CATALOGUE 47 



Northmen in Europe. The Making of Germany and the Rise of the 
Empire. Lay-Investiture. Three hours credit. 

102. The Middle Ages. 

The Crusaders. The Hohenstaufens. Invasion of the Mongols. 
Saint Louis. Life in the Middle Ages. Feudalism. England and 
France in the Middle Ages. The Exile of the Papacy. The Western 
Schism. The Hundred Years' War. The War of the Roses. Con- 
solidation of European Monarchies. Three hours credit. 

201. Renaissance and! Revolution. 

The Revival of Learning, of Art and Politics. Social Condi- 
tions. The Protestant Revolution in Germany, England and Scot- 
land. Catholic Revival. The Huguenot Wars in France. The Revolt 
of the Netherlands. The Thirty Years' War. The Puritan Revolu- 
tion. The Age of Louis XIV. The War of the Spanish Succession. 
The Church and the State. The Making of Russia. The Rise of Prus- 
sia. The Downfall of Poland. The French Revolution. Napoleon Bon- 
aparte. Three hours credit. 

202. Europe Since 1814. 

The Industrial Revolution. England and France in the Nine- 
teenth Century. The Unification of Germany. The Unification of 
Italy. The Social, Political and Religious Conditions in Europe. 
The Eastern Question. The Partition of Africa. The World War 
of 1914. Reconstruction after World War. 

Three hours credit. 

301. American History to the Reconstruction Period. 

This course, with the following^ aims to bring into relief the 
outstanding influences that have shaped the history of the United 
States from the Colonial Period to our own, stressing for this pur- 
pose topics of import for the social, economic and political develop- 
ment of the nation. Junior and Senior year. First semester. 

Three hours credit. 

302. American History Since the Reconstruction Period. 

A similar course to the preceding, stressing in its latest phases 
the conditions and circumstances that led to America's participation 
in the Great War, with the resulting stimulus to a clearer national 
consciousness of the value and significance of American citizen- 
ship. Three hours credit. 

LATIN 

1-2. Elementary Latin. 

General grammar with oral and written exercises. Caesar, De 
Bello Gallico I-IV. 



48 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

3. Cicero. 

In Catilinam I-III; Letters. Grammar and Composition. 

4. Virgil. 

Aeneid I- VI; Ovid, Metamorphoses XIII-XIV. Grammar and 
Composition. 

(Courses 1, 2, 3 and 4 are required of those students who do 
not offer sufficient Latin credits at entrance. These courses do not 
fulfil the requirement of College Latin.) 

101-2. Virgil, Horace, Cicero. 
Virgil, Aeneid V-XII, selections Georgics. Horace, De Arte 
Poetica. Cicero, Pro Archia Poeta, Pro Ligario, De Amicitia, De 
Senectute, Somnium Scipionis. Grammar reviewed and frequent 
composition based on Arnold. Six hours credit. 

201-2. ,Horace, Cicero. 

Horace, selected Odes and Epodes. Cicero, Pro Marcello, Pro 
Milone, Pro Lege Manilia. Rhetorical analysis. Grammar reviewed 
and frequent compositions based on Arnold. Required of Sopho- 
more. Six hours credit. 

301. Horace, Virgil, Juvenal. 

Horace, selected Epistles and Satires. Virgil, Bucolics. Juvenal, 
selected satires. Study of Roman Satire. 

Three hours credit. 

302. Cicero, Quintilian. 

Cicero, De Claris Oratoribus, De Oratore. Quintilian, Training 
of the Orator. Study of Roman Oratory. Three hours credit. 

401. PlautuSj Terence. 

Selected plays. Three hours credit. 

402. Pliny, Seneca. 

Pliny, selected letters of Pliny the Younger. Seneca, Moral 
Essays, selected letters. Three hours credit. 

403. Ecclesiastical Latin. 

Hymns and homilies selected. One hour credit. 

MATHEMATICS 

1. Advanced Algebra. 

A course for those who present but one unit of Algebra for 
entrance to college. The work starts with a review of Elementary 
Algebra, and then takes up such subjects as are usually given in a 
third semester high school course of Algebra. 

2. Geometry. 

A course for those who have not had Solid Geometry in high 



CATALOGUE 49 



school. Cannot be counted in fulfilment of the requirements in 
Mathematics. 

101. College Algebra. 

After a brief review of the foundations, the following topics are 
treated: variables and limits, binomial theorem, series, logarithms, 
determinants, and theories of equation. Prerequisites: Entrance 
Algebra, one and one-half units; and Plane Geometry. 

Three hours credit. 

102. Plane Trigonometry. 

The six elementary functions for acute angles; goniometry; 
solution of right and oblique triangles; graphs of the functions and 
solution of simple trigonometric equation. Three hours credit. 

103. Spherical Trigonometry. 

The right spherical triangle. Napier's rules, formulas and 
methods for the solution of the general triangle. Open to students 
who have had Mathematics 102. Two hours credit. 

104. Surveying. 

The theory, use and adjustment of instruments, methods of 
computation and arrangement of data; practical field work and 
topographic map-making. Three hours credit. 

201. Plane Analytic Geometry. 

Loci and their equations. The straight line; the circle; the 
parabola, ellipse, and hyperbola; transformation of co-ordinates; 
polar co-ordinates. Five hours credit. 

202. Solid Analytic Geometry. 

An introductory treatment of the point, plane, straight line, 
and surfaces of revolution. Three hours credit. 

204. Differential Calculus. 

Fundamental notions of variables; functions, limits, deriva- 
tives and differentials; differentiation of the ordinary algebraic, ex- 
ponential and trigonometric functions with geometric applications to 
minims, inflexions and envelopes; Taylor's formula. 

Five hours credit. 

301. Integral Calculus. 

The nature of integration; elementary processes and integrals; 
geometric applications to area, length, volume and surface; multiple 
integrals; use of infinite series in integration. 

Five hours credit. 

302. Differential Equations. 

A study of the more common types of ordinary differential 
equations, especially those of the first and second orders, with em- 



50 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

phasis on geometrical interpretations and applications to geometry, 
elementary mechanics and physics. 

Four hours lecture per week. 

303. Theory of the Definite Integral. 

A course treating of the properties and methods of computing 
definite integrals ? including a study of approximation, improper 
definite integrals, Eulerian integrals, multiple integrals, with prob- 
lems and practical applications. 

PHILOSOPHY 

NOTE — The courses outlined below take two years for their 
completion, unless otherwise specified. A shorter course embracing 
Logic is offered and required as a minimum from candidates for all 
academic degrees. 

201. Introduction to Logic. 

Classification of Ideas; Verbal Terms, the classification of Ver- 
bal Terms; Judgments, Propositions — Classification of Propositions; 
Reasoning, Fundamental Principles of Reasoning; Syllogism, its 
Laws, Fallacies. One hour credit. 

202. Introduction to Epistomology. 

Logical Truth found in the Simple Apprehension and in the 
Judgments; Universal Skepticism; Certitude; Kinds of Certitude; 
Opinion; Sources of Certitude; Testimony of the External Senses; 
Human Tentimony; Universal Criterion of Truth. Two hours credit. 

301- A. Logic. 

Simple Apprehension, Classification of Ideas; Verbal Terms, the 
classification and use; Logical Division, Definition; Judgments and 
Proposititons, their division according to quality, quantity and mat- 
ter; Opposition, Equivalence, and Conversion of Propositions. Rea- 
soning: Fundamental Principles of Reasoning; The Syllogism, its 
Laws, Figures and Modes; other Forms of Reasoning, Induction, 
Analogy; Classification of Arguments according to their validity; 
Sophisms; Method; the Circle. Two hours credit. 

301-B. Criteriology or Applied Logic. 

Conceptual Truth and the Possibility of Attaining it; State of 
the mind with regard to truth. Certitude; its nature, kind; Skepti- 
cism; the Methodical Doubt; Opinion; Trustworthiness of the Hu- 
man Faculties for the Attainment of Truth; Consciousness, the 
External Senses; the Intellect, Nominalism, Conceptualism, Exag- 
gerated and Moderate Realism. Sources of Certitude: Human Tes- 
timony; Universal Testimony; Divine Testimony; Tradition; Hi-s- 
tory; the New Criticism; Objective Evidence. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Two hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 51 



302-A. General Metaphysics or Ontology. 

Being and its Transcendental Attributes; Real Being, Logical 
Being; Extension, Comprehension, Analogy, Unity, Truth 2 Good- 
ness. State of Being: Actual and Possible; Proximate and Ulti- 
mate; Foudation of Intrinsic Possibility. Kinds of Being: Sub- 
stance, Accident; The Aristotelian Categories. Causality. Causes 
in General; Material, Formal and Efficient; The First Cause; 
Final Cause; Exemplary Cause. Perfection of Being: Simple and 
Composite; Finite and Infinite; Contingent and Necessary; Time 
and Eternity; Order, Beauty, Sublimity. Two hours credit. 

302-B. Cosmology. 

General Properties of Corporeal Substance: Quantity; Con- 
tinuous Extension, Condensation and Rarefaction; Impenetrability, 
Space, Place; Motion, Time; Change, Substance, Accidents. 
Intrinsic Constituents of Corporeal Substances; Atomism; Dynam- 
ism; Hylomorphism. Organic Life; The Vital Principle, Nutrition, 
Growth; Reproduction; Sensative Life, Sense Perceptions, Sensuous 
Appetite, Spontaneous Locomotions; the Dynamic Principle; the 
Substantial Form; Darwinism rejected. Two hours credit 

402. Special Metaphysics. 

The Existence of God; Metaphysical, Physical and Moral 
Proofs. The Nature and Attributes of God; His Self -Existence, In- 
finity, Unity, Immutability, Eternity and Immensity. 

His Operative Attributes: a. The Divine Intelligence; His 
Knowledge of Pure Intelligence, of Vision; Scientia Media of Fu- 
turibles. b. The Divine Will; Its Holiness; Its Primary and Sec- 
ondary Objects; Its relation toward Moral and Physical Evil. 
Action of God in the Universe; Creation, Conservation; Concur- 
rence; Divine Providence; Miracles. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Two hours credit. 

401. Psychology. 

The Human Intellect and its Proper Object; its Spirituality 
proved by its acts; Origin of Ideas; Innate Ideas; Empiricism and 
Ontologism rejected. The Human Will and its Formal Object; its 
Freedom; its control of the other faculties. Nature of the Human 
Soul; a Substantial Principle, Simple, Spiritual, Immortal; its Union 
with the Body; its Origin. The Unity and Antiquity of the Human 
Race. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Two hours credit. 

403. General Ethics. 

Ethics defined. The material object of ethics; the human act, 
the voluntary, the free and deliberate, and the causes modifying the 



THE THOMAS BYRNE 
MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

SPRING HILL COLLEGE 
SPRING HILL, ALA. 



52 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

voluntary and the free. The foundation of morality; the ultimate 
end of man, the divine eternal law, the divine natural law. The 
formal object of ethics; the morality of human acts ; the norm of 
morality, hedonism, utilitarianism, rationalism and moral positivism 
refuted, the determinants of morality, the proximate objective crite- 
rion of morality, conscience. Four hours credit. 

404. Special Ethics. 

Rights and duties in general. Man's duties toward God. Man's 
duties toward himself. Man's duties toward others. Right of own- 
ership. Social system of collectivism. Socialism. Modes of acquir- 
ing property. Society in general. The family. Divine institution, 
unity and indissolubility of marriage. Parental authority. Educa- 
tion. Civil society; its nature, origin, end. Origin of supreme civil 
authority. Specific forms of civil government. International law. 

Four hours credit. 

303. History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. 
Oriental Philosophy; Greek Philosophy; Christian Philosophy; 

The Gnostics; The Neo-Platonists; the Fathers of the Church; 
Scholastic Philosophy; the Revival of Platonism, of Aristotelianism, 
of Atomism; the Secular Philosophers; the Political Philosophers. 

Two hours credit. 

304. History of Modern Philosophy. 

Descartes and His Followers; Malbranche, Locke, Hume, Vol- 
taire, the Encyclopaedists; Leibnitz, the Scottish School 2 the Trans- 
cendentalists; Kant, Fichte, Schelling and their Schools of Thought. 
The Neo-Kantians. Current Philosophical Theories. The Neo-Scholas- 
tics. Two hours credit. 

THE PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 

The Philosophy of Religion is a systematic study of religion in 
all its phases as known exclusively from the light of reason and well 
established historical facts. 

101-2. Comparative Religion. 

General notions of philosophy and religion; the definition and 
divisions of religion; a general history of the world's greatest relig- 
ions; the ways of distinguishing the true from the false religions; 
Rationalism, its history and final bankruptcy; Revelation, its nature, 
necessity and history. Four hours credit. 

201-2. Biblical Criticism. 

The historical value of the Old and New Testaments; a special 
study of the "Acts of the Apostles" from a historical and philosophi- 
cal viewpoint; inspiration, its meaning. Four hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 53 



301-2. Analysis of Faith. 

Faith, its nature and norm; God, His Existence, Nature, Unity, 
and Trinity; the means of communication between God and Man. 

Four hours credit. 

401-2. Morality. 

Morality, its objective and subjective norms, namely Law and 
Conscience; Man's duties to himself, to his neighbor and to God. 



Four hours credit. 

SOCIOLOGY 

(Refer to page 55) 

PHYSICS. 

201-2. General Physics. 

Mechanics, Sound, Light, Heat, Magnetism and Electricity. 
Prerequisite: Plane Trigonometry. Lectures, experimental demon- 
stration and recitation. Eight hours credit. 

301-2. Advanced Physics. 

A more mathematical treatment of Mechanics, Molecular 
Physics, Light, Heat and Electricity. Must be preceded or accom- 
panied by a course of Calculus. 

Prerequisite: Courses 201-2. Eight hours credit. 

303-4. Electricity and Magnetism; Radioactivity; the Electron 
Theory. 

Must be preceded or accompanied by Calculus. Prerequisite*. 
Couses 201-2. Eight hours credit. 

305-6. Experimental Physics. 

Advanced laboratory work in Mechanics, Molecular Physics, 
Light and Heat. A few lectures are given on the theory of physical 
measurements and measuring instruments with special attention to 
the computation of results. Recommended to be taken in concur- 
rence with Courses 301-2. Prerequisite: Courses 201-2. 

Six hours credit. 

401-2. Experimental Physics. 

Advanced laboratory work in Electricity and Magnetism. Ac- 
curate measurement of current, resistance, electromotive force ca- 
pacity; magnetic properties of iron and steel; use of electrometer 
and potentiometer; a practical study of the properties of direct and 
alternating currents and of the principles underlying the construc- 
tion of dynamo-electric machinery. Prerequisite: Courses 303-4. 

Six hours credit. 



64 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

403. Electric Oscillations and Electromagnetic Waves; Radio 
Communication. 

Lectures two hours per week. One semester. Prerequisite: 
Course 201 and a Course in Calculus. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

Ample opportunity is offered the student for physical exer- 
cises, both indoor and outdoor. A well equipped gynasium affords 
opportunity for apparatus work. Organized leagues in baseball, 
basketball and tennis help to make these sports more interesting, 
and insure participation in them by a large number of students. A 
beautiful natural lake three minutes' walk from the College makes 
it possible to have swimming during almost the whole school year. 
Instruction is given in boxing, wrestling and in track work. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

101-2. American Government. 

American National Government. The historical background 
of the Federal Constitution and of political issues in the United 
States, and the organization and functions of the National Govern- 
ment. The President. The Cabinet. The Senate. The House of 
Represetatives. The Supreme Court and the Subordinate Federal 
Courts. Local and State Government in the United States. The 
place of the States in the Nation. The State Constitutions. The 
State Legislature. The State Courts. Organization and functions 
of administration in counties and cities. 

Six hours credit. 

201-2. Party Politics. 

The development of political parties in the United States. Im- 
portance of the extra-constitutional element in American Govern- 
ment. Party platforms. Presidential campaigns and elections. 
The nominating machinery; the Presidential primary and the 
nominating convention. Party patronage. The spoils system 
and civil service reform. State parties and practical politics in 
local government. Two Semesters. Six hours credit. 

301-2. American Government and Party Politics. 

A more general course adapted to the needs of students who 
desire to make a less intensive study of the matter of Courses 1-4. 
Two semesters. Three hours credit. 

401-2. Constitutional Law. 

Fundamental principles of the United States Constitution 
viewed in the light of their history, development and application. 
The making of the Constitution. The Constitution regarded as a 






CATALOGUE 55 



grant of power. Federal powers and State powers. The principle 
of "checks and balances." The doctrine of Judicial Supremacy. 
Constitutional Limitations on Legislative Power. Limits of the 
Police Power of the States. The Guarantees of the Fourteenth 
Amendment. Religious Liberty. The Fifteenth Amendment and 
the Negro Problem. State Constitutions. Two Semesters. 

Six hours credit. 

403. Comparative Government. 

A compartive study of the governmental organization and 
administration of the principal European nations. 

Three hours credit. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

101. Principles of Vocal Expression. 

Practical training in the fundamentals of effective speaking. 
Instruction on the management of the breath; methods of acquiring 
clear articulation; correct and refined pronunciation; direct, con- 
versational and natural speaking; inflection; qualities of voice and 
their use; purity, range and flexibility of tone. Individual criticism 
and conference with the instructor. One hour credit. 

102. Gesture and Technique of Action. 

The study of poise, posture, movement and gesture; spon- 
taneity of expression; correction of mannerisms; power and pathos; 
ease, grace and effectiveness of delivery. Class exercises, criti- 
cisms and conferences. One hour credit. 

201. Argumentation and Debating. 

A practical training for those students who have taken or are 
taking the course in oratory prescribed under English 4. Thought 
development; division and arrangement; argumentative, persuasive 
and demonstrative speeches; a finished argument and the fallacies 
of argument; the essentials of parliamentary law and practice; man- 
ner of conducting deliberative assemblies. Class exercises ? criti- 
cisms and conferences. One hour credit. 

202. The Occasional Public Address. 

Informal public address; the presentation of business proposi- 
tions before small or large audiences; impromptu and extempore 
speaking; after-dinner talks. Speeches for various occasioins. 
Class exercises, individual criticisms and conferences. 

One hour credit. 

SOCIOLOGY. 

301. Social History. 

A survey of ancient, medieval and modern social movements. 



56 SPRING HIL L COLLEGE 

Social value of Mosaic laws and Christian practice with special em- 
phasis on industrial democracy. A review of modern reforms, fac- 
tory legislation, workingman's compensation, social insurance, profit 
sharing and industrial co-operation. The Church in modern social 
problems. Three hours credit. 

401-2. General Sociology. 

An introduction to the scientific study of social problems and 
their relation to the family and the individual. A study of natural 
resources, population, immigration, labor organization, woman and 
child labor. Also problems of poverty, crime, housing, with a sur- 
vey of preventive work relating to the poor, defective and delin- 
quent. Four hours credit. 

302. Social Ethics. 

An application of Christian ethics to economic and social phe- 
nomena. The origin and development of the family, marriage, and 
the social order. The ethics of property, liberalism, socialism and 
communism; capital and labor combines; strikes, lockouts and boy- 
cotts; public ownership and control; monopolies and modern 
finance; public health, control of education, traffic, etc. 

Three hours credit. 

403-4. Organized Charity. 

A study of conditions affecting the family and community. 
The purposes and methods of investigation, diagnosis and treatment 
studied by means of selected cases. Co-operation of public and 
private agencies is studied and inspection visits made to important 
institutions. Three hours credit. 

SPANISH. 

101. Elementary Spanish. 

Grammar: Garner. Alphabet, pronunciation, accentuation, 
punctuation and capitals. The article and noun; adjectives; numer- 
als; personal and demonstrative pronouns; auxiliary and regular 
verbs. For reading: Second Spanish Book, Worman and Bransby 
(complete). First semester. Three hours credit. 

102. Elementary Spanish (Continued). 

Grammar: Garner. Pronouns (continued) — relative, interroga- 
tive and indefinite. Auxiliary and regular verbs (repeated), ortho- 
graphic changes, formation of tenses, passive voice, reflexive verbs, 
impersonal verbs. For reading: Alarcon, El Capitan Veneno. Second 
semester. Three hours credit. 

201-2. Intermediate Spanish. 

Open to students who have completed Courses 1-2 or who have 



CATALOGUE 57 



presented two units of Spanish for admission. Advanced grammar; 
idiomatic uses of the prepositions; irregular verbs, verbs requiring 
a preposition. Composition and conversation. Colma, Lecturas Re- 
creatives; Valera, El Pajaro Verde; Alarcon, Novelas Cortas. 

Six hours credit. 

301-2. Advanced Spanish. 

A detailed study of Spanish prose style, the reading of repre- 
sentative Spanish authors, composition and conversation. 

Six hours credit. 

103-4. Commercial Spanish. 

Practice in colloquial Spanish, commercial forms, letter-writ- 
ing and advertisements. Current journals and other literature deal- 
ing with the life and customs of South America and Spain. Reading 
of the geography, government, industries and commerce of these 
countries. Six hours credit. 

303. Classical Prose. 

Selections from Cervantes, Don Quixote de la Mancha; St. The- 
resa, Life of; Ribadeneira, Historia del Cisma de Inglaterra, selec- 
tions. Kelly, History of Spanish Literature. Three hours credit. 

304. Classical Poetry. 

Fray Luis de Leon, poesias; Romancero General (Duran) ; 
Jorge Manriquo, Coplas, selections. Three hours credit. 

401. Modern Prose. 

Luis Coloma, Jeromin; Boy, La Reina Martir; Jose Maria 
Pereda, Penas arriba, Cuentos y novelas; Saj, Europa salvaje; Fer- 
nan Caballero, La Gaviota, Clemencia; Valvuena, Estudios Critices. 

Three hours credit. 

402. Modern Poetry. 

Selections from the writings of Alberto Risco, Jose Selgas, 
Nunez de Arce, Zorilla. Three hours credit. 

403. Spanish Drama and Oratory. 

Classical period: selections from the writings of Calderon and 
Lope de Vaga. Modern period: Tamayo y Baus, Los hombres de 
bien, Lances de honor; Nunez de Arose, El haz de lena. Oratory. 
Donoso Cortes and Nocedal, Discursos. Three hours credit. 



58 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



The Department of Commerce 



OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Commerce, offers to the student 
a most thorough course in business administration com- 
bined with cultural subjects in order to cultivate the mind, 
to build thought and reasoning and that breadth of view 
which must ever be the foundation, as well of more ad- 
vanced scholarship, as of eminence in the commercial 
field. Its purposes are to prepare students for the fol- 
lowing occupational levels: (1) upper levels composed 
of proprietors and executives; (2) intermediate levels 
composed of department heads and minor executives ; and 
(3) lower levels composed of clerical and routine 
workers. 

The modern business world, highly complex in char- 
acter, is made up of a multitude of specialized units. 
These units not only compete, but also co-operate with 
each other in creating goods and services for the satis- 
faction of human wants. Those who would win success 
in the field of business must be familiar with the funda- 
mental elements of business management. They must 
develop facility in the use of quantitative instruments in 
the determination of business policies. They must recog- 
nize the larger relationships between business leadership 
and general social well-being. 

In addition to a thorough course in economics, bus- 
iness administration, and the other important branches 
of business, it affords the student a thorough training in 
mental philosophy and Christian ethics. 

At the completion of this course, in addition to ob- 
taining the degree, the student will also be prepared to 
take the State Certified Public Accountant's examination. 



CATALOGUE 59 



BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

The Department of Commerce occupies quarters in 
the Main Building and in Mobile Hall. The office of the 
Head of the Department is located in the Main Build- 
ing. The Dean of the College and the rest of the faculty- 
members have offices in Mobile Hall. 

The accounting and statistical laboratories are in 
the Main Building. In these laboratories students are 
provided with desks, tables, adding machines, calculators 
and other types of equipment. Class rooms are located 
in both the Main Building and Mobile Hall. 

The Department does not have a special library or 
reading rooms. All books, reports, and magazines are 
located in The Thomas Byrne Memorial Library. Com- 
fortable reading rooms are maintained there for use of 
these books, reports, and magazines. 



LECTURES AND CLASS VISITS 

In connection with the work of this department, lectures are 
given at regular intervals on subjects in course by prominent busi- 
ness and professional men of the City of Mobile, and class visits are 
made at intervals to banks and industrial establishments for the 
purpose of observation and investigation. 



DEGREE 

The subjects offered in this department comprise a four-year 
course, which leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Com- 
merce. With a view to making the work of this department as 
practical as possible, text-book study and lectures are combined with 
the laboratory method and case system, thus affording the student 
abundant opportunity to test and apply the basic principles of mod- 
ern business. 



60 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



THE CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE 



First Semester — 
Accounting Principles 
Economic Geography 

Modern Language 

English 

Business Mathematics 
Public Speaking 

First Semester — 
Advanced Accounting 
Principles of 

Economics 

English 

Modern Language 

Business Law 

Public Speaking 

Introd. to Philosophy.. 



3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
1 hour 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester — 
Accounting Principles 
Economic Geography 

Modern Language 

English 

Business Mathematics 
Public Speaking 



SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester — 
3 hours Advanced Accounting 

Principles of 

Economics 

English 

Modern Language 

Business Law 

Introd. to Philosophy.. 



3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
1 hour 
1 hour 



3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
1 hour 



3 hours 

3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
2 hours 



JUNIOR 



First Semester — 

Accounting Systems .. 3 hours 

Corporation Finance .. 3 hours 

Public Finance 3 hours 

History 3 hours 

General Metaphysics 4 hours 



Second Semester — 
Auditing and C. P. A. 

Problems 

Corporation Finance . 

Banking 

History 

Cosmology 



SENIOR 



First Semester — 

Cost Accounting 3 hours 

Insurance 3 hours 

Elements of Statistics 3 hours 

Advertising and 

Salesmanship 3 hours 

Ethics 4 hours 



Second Semester — 
Income Tax Procedure 
Public Utilities 



Business 

Administration 

Marketing 

Ethics 



3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 

3 hours 

4 hours 



3 hours 
3 hours 



3 hours 

3 hours 

4 hours 



SUBJECTS IN COURSE 

Subjects with odd numbers are given in the first semester 
and subjects with even numbers are given in the second semester. 

The number of hours given is the number of hours which the 
class meets per week. 



CATALOGUE 61 



The number of credits is the number of semester credit hours 
earned by each student who receives a passing grade when the sub- 
ject is completed. 

Freshman Courses 100, Sophomore 200, Junior 300, and Senior 
400. 

Commerce 101. Economic Geography. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

A comprehensive survey of man's utilization of the earth in 
making a living; a study of the world's major regions and of their 
present and potential production of food and raw materials for 
manufacture. Special attention will be devoted to the South in 
general and to Alabama in particular. 

Commerce 102-E. Economic History of the United States. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

The economic development of the United States from the 
period of settlement to the present time; origin and growth of lead- 
ing American industries; changes in industrial organization; com- 
mercial policies; influence of economic conditions on political 
history; problems of expansion. 

*Commerce 111-112. Principles of Accounting. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Six credits. 

Meaning and purpose of accounting; the balance sheet; state- 
ment of profit and loss; accounts; construction of asset and 
proprietorship accounts; accounts with customers and creditors; 
adjusting and closing entries; books of original entry; controlling 
accounts; accruals and deferred items; partnerships; opening and 
closing corporation books. 

* Commerce 201-E-202-E. Principles of Economics. 

Three hours. Six credits. 

An analysis of production, distribution, and consumption; 
theories concerning rents, profits, interest ad wages. A discussion 
of proposed remedies for inequality of distribution of wealth; 
single tax, government ownership, profit-sharing, co-operative 
enterprises. 

^Commerce 211-212. Advanced Accounting. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Six credits. 

An advanced study in accounting theory and practice. Profits; 
statements at the end of the accounting period; partnerships; cor- 
porations; installment sales; agencies and branches; consignments; 
venture accounts; accounting for insolvent concerns and statement 
of affairs. 

♦Commerce 221-222. Business Law. 

Three hours. Six credits. 

Law in general, its definition, origin and sources; written and 



62 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

unwritten law; law and equity jcontracts defined and classified; 
origin of property; title to personal property; mortgages and their 
uses. 

*301-E-302-E. Corporation Finance. 

Three hours. Six credits. 

Principles of financing; forms of business enterprises; the 
corporate form and its status before the low; owned and borrowed 
capital; basis of capitalization; sources of capital funds; disposi- 
tion of gross earning; budgets; reorganization. 

* Subjects for which no credit is given unless both semesters 
are completed. 

Commerce 311. Accounting* Systems. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Three credits 

Study of reorganization in the form of consolidations, merg- 
ers, holdings companies, and trusts; description and explanation 
of the various accounting forms, books records, methods and sys- 
tems employed by various types of business. 

Commerce 312. Auditing and C. P. A. Problems. 

Two laboratory hours. Three credits. 

Quafilications, duties and responsibilities of the public auditor; 
exact rules covering every detail of making an audit of books and 
records of representative business concerns; methods of securing 
and handling engagements; working papers and audit reports; 
C. P. A. problems of an advanced nature presented and analyzed. 

Commerce 321-E. Public Finance. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

The evolution of securities; organized security markets and 
their economic functions; origin, development, purpose, and oper- 
ation of the New York Stock Exchange; the dangers and benefits 
of stock speculation; floor trader; specialist; odd-lot business; secur- 
ity deliveries, loans and transfers; the stock exchange and American 
business. 

Commerce 322. Banking. 

Three hours Three credits. 

Brief history of origin and development of banking; early 
banks and banking systems of United States; operation of the Fed- 
eral Reserve System; foreign banking systems; classes of credit 
and credit instruments; money, credit and prices; international 
exchange. 

Commerce 331-E. Transportation Principles. 

Three hours Three credits. 

Relation of transportation to industry and society; develop- 
ment and present status of American transportation systems; 
organization of transportation service; rates and regulations. 



CATALOGUE 63 



Commerce 332-E. Foreign Trade. 

Three hours Three credits. 

Principles of international distribution; development of export 
markets; export and import machinery; trade regulation. 

Commerce 401-E. Elements of Statistics. 

Three hours Three credits. 

An introduction to statistics; a brief consideration of statistical 
theory; collection, classification and presentation of economic data; 
construction of graphs and charts; study of index numbers; prob- 
lems of statistical research. 

Commerce 402. Business Administration. 

Three hours. Three credits 

Methods of organizing and controlling the work of industrial 
establishments; selection of plant site; nearness to raw materials and 
to market; available labor supply; power and transportation; profit 
sharing; types of internal organization; office administration; per- 
sonnel; standards and records. 

Commerce 411. Cost Accounting. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Three credits. 

The need and value of cost accounting; classifications of cost; 
process cost systems and specific order cost systems; manufac- 
turing expense theory; accounting for material; accounting for labor 
costs; distribution of costs; debatable methods; relative values; 
establishment and uses of standard costs. 

Commerce 412. Income Tax Procedure. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Three credits. 

Revenue Act of 1928; returns for individuals; gross income; 
exempt income; deductions from gross income; computation of 
taxes; income tax procedure; returns for corporations; computation 
for corporation taxes; supplementary problems. 

Commerce 421. Advertising and Salesmanship. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

The specific purpose of advertising; the copy; slogans; trade- 
marks; newspapers; magazines; advertising research; preparing and 
making the sales presentation; overcoming objections and closing 
the sale; sales promotion. 

Commerce 422-E. Principles of Marketing. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

The marketing functions; marketing farm products; marketing 
raw materials; marketing manufactured products; distribution 
through brokers, jobbers, wholesalers, commission houses; market 
finance; market risk; market news; standardization; market price; 
the cost of marketing. 



64 SPRING HI LL COLLEGE 

Commerce 431. Insurance. 

Three hours. . Three credits. 

Underlying principles, important practices and principal legal 
phases of life, fire, marine, employers' liability, fidelity, corporate 
surety, title, and credit insurance; state regulation of companies; 
underwriters' associations and their work. 

Commerce 432-E. Public Utilities. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

Characteristics of public utilities; regulation by franchises and 
commissions; valuation; rate of return; rate structures; regulation 
of service, accounts and reports; public relations; public owner- 
ship. 

Commerce 441. Real Estate. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

What real estate is; the origin and development of real estate 
ownership; practical discussion of the details involved in the con- 
duct of transactions of real estate activity. 

Commerce 422. Investments. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

A study of the underlying principles of investment credit; ele- 
ments of sound investment and methods of computing net earings, 
amortization, rights and convertibles; the investment policies of 
individuals and institutions; the investment market and its rela- 
tion to the money market. 

Commerce 450. Preparations for the C. P. A. Certificate. 

No credit. 

Questions and problems based on examination given by the 
American Institute of Accountants. Individual instruction given. 

Examinations for the certificate of Certified Public Account- 
ant are held in Montgomery twice a year, in May and November. 
Applications may be made to the Secretary of State. 

Biology, Chemistry, Drawing, Education, English, Evidences of 
Religion, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics, Phy- 
sics, Philosophy, Sociology, and Spanish — refer to the subjects in the 
Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

Note: The course in Commerce marked "E" are the same 
courses as those in Economics. For example, Commerce 201-E is 
the same as Economics 201, or Commerce 422-E is the same as 
Economics 422. 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 65 



Department of Education 



The Department of Education of Spring Hill College 
was organized in August and September, 1931, in re- 
sponse to an actual need of many of its students. It began 
to function September 7, 1931, and opened its classes to 
students the following day. October 14 of the same yeai 
the Department of Education of the State of Alabama 
was formally petitioned to grant its approval of the cur- 
ricula of the college for the academic and professional 
training of teachers, and was invited to visit the institu- 
tion. In response to this invitaton, Dr. B. L. Parkinson, 
Director of Teacher Training, Certification and Elemen- 
tary Education, visited Spring Hill December 14, and in 
the due course of time, the following letter was received 
by the President: 

STATE OF ALABAMA 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

MONTGOMERY 

December 21, 1931. 
Rev. J. M. Walsh, President, 
Spring Hill College, 
Spring Hill, Alabama. 
Dear Father Walsh: 

It gives me pleasure to inform you that the organization of 
your curriculum, your teaching staff and your student teaching, as 
well as your equipment, meet the requirements for preparing teach- 
ers for secondary schools, and that we shall take pleasure in certifi- 
cating such of your graduates as you may recommend for the pro- 
fessional C and the professional B secondary certificates. 

In this connection allow me to thank you for the many courte- 
sies which you extended to me on last Wednesday when I was a 
visitor to your institution. 

With the season's greetings, I remain, 

Sincerely yours, 

B. L. Parkinson, 
Director of Teacher Training, Cer- 
tification and Elementary Ed- 
ucation. 



66 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



SECONDARY SCHOOL CERTIFICATES 



Class of 
Certificate 


Amount of 

Approved 

Training 

Above H. S. 

on which 

Based. 




Length of Validity 




Scope 

of 

Validity 


Recom- 
mended 
Minimum 
Beginning 
Monthly 
Salary 


C 




Three 
Years 




Three Years. Not 
Renewable. 




Grades 
7 to 12 


$ 85.00 


B 




Four 
Years 
(Bacca- 
laureate 
Degree) 


Six Years. Permanent aft- 
er four years of success- 
ful teaching experience. To 
remain permanently certi- 
fied holder must teach four 


Grades 

7 to 12 


$ 95.00 



years out of each six-year 
period of certificate's va- 
lidity. When this is not 
done, certificate may be re- 
instated when its holder 
earns 12 semester hours of 
credit in courses approved 
by State Board of Educa- 
tion. 



A Five Six Years. Permanent aft- Grades $125.00 

Years er four years of success- 7 to 12 
or More ful teaching experience. To 
(Master's remain permanently certi- 
Degree) fied, holder must teach four 
years out of each six-year 
period of certificate's valid- 
ity. When this is not done, 
certificate may be rein- 
stated when its holder 
earns 12 semester hours of 
credit in courses approved 
by State Board of Educa- 
tion. 

SECONDARY CLASS C CERTIFICATE 

To be eligible for the Secondary Class C certificate as of July 
1, 1934, an applicant must present credentials showing 

(1) That he has completed the junior year of standard col- 
lege work; 

(2) That among his other credits he must present the fol- 
lowing: 

1. English Semester Hours 
a. Grammar and Composition 6 



CATALOGUE 67 



b. Survey of English Literature 6 

2. History and Other Social Studies 

a. Introduction to History 6 

b. Political Science or Sociology or Economics 6 

3. Science (Biology recommended) 6 

4. General Psychology 6 

5. Education 

a. Educational Psychology 3 

b. Principles of High School Teaching 3 

c. Principles of Secondary Education 2 

d. Tests and Measures 2 

Total semester hours specified in first three years of 
training 46 

SECONDARY CLASS B CERTIFICATE 

To be eligible for the Secondary Class B certificate as of July 1, 
1934, an applicant must present credentials showing 

(1) That he holds a baccalaureate degree from an accredited 
college or university; 

(2) That he has to his credit basic courses as follows: 

1. English Semester Hours 

a. Grammar and Composition 6 

b. Survey of English Literature 6 

2. History and other Social Studies 

a. Introduction to History 6 

b. Political Science or Sociology or Economics 6 

3. Science (Biology recommended) 6 

4. General Psychology 6 

(3) That he has to his credit courses in education as follows: 

Educational Psychology 3 

Principles of High School Teaching 3 

Principles of Secondary Education 2 

Tests and measures , 2 

Materials and Methods of High School Teaching 5 

a. First field 3 

b. Second field 2 

Observation and Directed Teaching 3 

(One or both fields with not less than 30 full periods of class 
teaching.) 

Total Specified Education 18 



68 SPRING HI LL COLLEGE 

In addition to these 18 specified hours of credit in education 
the applicant must offer six semester hours selected from the fol- 
lowing professional courses: 

Semester Hours 

The American School System 2 to 3 

Educational Sociology 2 to 3 

Character Education 3 to 2 

Mental Hygiene 3 to 2 

Introduction to Education 3 to 2 

Guidance 3 to 2 

Extra-curricular Activities 3 to 2 

(4) That he has to his further credit a 24 semester hour major 
in one field and an 18 semester hour minor in another field. 

SECONDARY CLASS A CERTIFICATE 

To be eligible for a Secondary Class A certificate as of July 1, 
1934, an applicant must present credentials showing 

(1) That he holds a Master's Degree or its equivalent from an 
accredited college or university; 

(2) That in the pursuit of this degree, he has followed a curri- 
culum approved by the Division of Teacher Training, Certification 
and Elementary Education. 

The following "Memorandum for Certification of High School 
Teachers" was issued by the Department of Education, State of 
Alabama. 

"To be eligible for the professional secondary certificate, a 
college graduate must present a major of twenty-four (24) semes- 
ter hours and a minor of eighteen (18) semester hours in any 
approved subject, with an additional eighteen (18) semester hours in 
education (24 specified hours beginning in 1934), three of which are 
in supervised observation and practice teaching. An approved sub- 
ject is any subject taught in the public schools of Alabama." 

"No subject that is not named in the course of study for the 
public schools of Alabama as a required or elective may be accepted 
as a major, minor or a sub-minor in meeting the minimum require- 
ments for either of the three types of certificates mentioned in 
previous paragraphs." 



CATALOGUE 69 



Degrees With a Major in Education 

In the Department of Education, Spring Hill College 
offers its students an opportunity of pursuing courses in 
educational subjects either for cultural or professional 
reasons. The curricula offered provide especially for pros- 
pective Junior and Senior High School teachers and other 
educational workers. 

To follow courses in the Department of Education, 
the approval of the Head of the Department and of the 
Dean of the College is required. These courses are not 
open to Freshmen, and no one in any year who manifests 
a faulty use of English either written or spoken or any 
other defect which in the judgment of the head of the 
Department renders him unfit for high school training 
will be permitted to pursue a major in the Department 
of Education. The normal load is sixteen semester hours 
plus two in religion. Where specific combinations require 
it, work amounting to seventeen semester hours plus two 
in religion will be permitted. A load of eighteen semes- 
ter hours plus two in religion is the maximum, and nc 
student who has failed in any course at Spring Hill Col- 
lege will be allowed to carry the maximum load. 

The requirements for the bachelor's degree with a 
major in education include: 

(1) Every item of the requirements for the Sec- 
ondary Class B certificate to teach in the State of Ala- 
bama as given above. 

(2) Completion of one hundred twenty-eight se- 
mester hours of work with a grade of at least seventy in 
every course. 

(3) Satisfactory completion of all courses pre- 
scribed below for each respective degree. 

(4) At least the Senior year in residence at Spring 
Hill College. 



70 SPRING HI LL COLLEGE 

(5) A written thesis approved by the Dean of the 
College and presented on or before May 1 of the year in 
which the degree is expected to be conferred. 

(6) A fee of fifteen dollars payable in advance. 

(7) Settlement of all indebtedness to Spring Hill 
College. 

Candidates for degrees must file their applications 
for them on or before May 1. 

The semester hour is the unit or standard for com- 
puting a student's work. A semester hour is one lecture 
a week for a session i.e. a half-year. Lectures are one 
hour in length. Two hours of laboratory work are the 
equivalent of one hour of lecture. One and one-half hours 
of work outside the class period are required for every 
lecture ; one-half of an hour, for every two-hour period of 
laboratory work. 

During the year of residence, twenty-four semester 
hours of work must be taken. 

A student's grade of scholarship in every course is 
determined by the combined results of examinations and 
monthly work as stated above. 

In marking, the percentage system is used. The 
passing grade is 70. In addition to quantity credits, 
which are given on completion of a course with a mini- 
mum of 70, quality points are granted according to the 
quality of work done. A grade of 75 to 84 gives the 
student one quality credit for each quantity credit; a 
grade of 85 to 94, two quality credits for each quantity 
credit, and a grade of 95 to 100, three quality credits for 
each quantity credit. Quality credits are computed from 
the student's grade for the year. Information concerning 
grades is published at regular intervals at the office of 
the Dean of the College but not by professors. 

The Faculty reserves the right to refuse a degree to 
any student who fails to attend courses of lectures or 



CATALOGUE 



71 



other exercises which are or may be prescribed prior to 
graduation, even though no scholastic credit is given for 
such courses or exercises. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM OF COURSES FOR THE A. B. 
WITH A MAJOR IN EDUCATION 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Latin 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Introduc'n to History 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

English 3 

Latin 3 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Introduc'n to History 3 hours 

Mathematics S 

Public Speaking 1 



hours 
hours 



hours 
hour 



16 

First Semester — 

English 3 

Latin 3 

Modern Language 3 

Natural Science 

(Biology 

recommended) 4 

Intro d'n to Philosophy 1 
Introd'n to Education 2 
Public Speaking 1 



16 
SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester — 

hours English 3 hours 

hours Latin S hours 

hours Modern Language 3 hours 

Natural Science 
(Biology 

hours recommended) 4 hours 

hour Introd'n to Philosophy 2 hours 

hours The Americal School 

hour System 2 hours 



17 



17 



JUNIOR 

First Semester— Second Semester — 

General Psychology .. 4 hours Educat'n'l Psychology 3 hours 

Social Science: Social Science: 

Sociology or Sociology or 

Economics 3 hours Economics 3 hours 

Principles of Secon- Principles of High 

dary Education 2 hours School Teaching .... 3 hours 

Extra-curricular Approved Electives .... 7 hours 

Activities 3 hours — 

Tests and Measures.... 2 hours 16 

Approved Elective 2 hours 



16 



72 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

SENIOR 

First Semester — Second Semester — 

General Psychology .. 2 hours Philosophy 4 hours 

Philosophy 4 hours Materials and Methods 

Materials and Methods of High School 

of High School Teaching 3 hours 

Teaching 2 hours Observation and Prac- 

Observation and Prac- tice Teaching 1 Vz hrs. 

tice Teaching 1 M$ hrs. Approved Electives .... 7 hours 

Approved Electives .... 7 hours — 

— 15 y 2 
16 y 2 

N. B. For a Secondary Class B Certificate to teach in Alabama, 
the State Department of Education requires 

A major of 24 semester hours in education; 

A major of 24 semester hours in an approved subject; and 

A minor of 18 semester hours in another approved subject. 

A. B. WITH A MAJOR IN EDUCATION 



To satisfy the scholastic requirements for the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts with a major in Education, each candidate must pass 
128 semester hours of work. The following courses are prescribed 
for candidates for this degree: 

Cultural: Semester Hours 

English 12 

Latin 12 

Modern Foreign Language 12 

Mathematics 6 

Introduction to History 6 

Sociology or Economics 6 

Natural Science 8 

Philosophy (Including 6 in psychology) 18 

Professional : 

Introduction to Education 2 

The American School System 2 

Principles of Secondary Education 2 

Extra-curricular Activities \ 3 

Principles of High School Teaching 3 

Tests and Measures 2 

Educational Phychology 3 



CATALOGUE 73 



Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (minor field). ... 2 
Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (major field).... 3 
Observation and Practice Teaching 3 

Teaching Major and Minor: 

In addition to the above requirements, the candidate must have 
completed a major of 24 semester hours in one approved teaching 
field and a minor of 18 semester hours in another. For this degree, 
the major must be selected from group I below; the minor, from 
group I or group II. 

Group I: Group II: 
English Latin 

French Spanish 

History Biology 

Mathematics Physics 

Chemistry 

A composite major of 32 semester hours or minor of 24 semes- 
ter hours in cognate subjects may be selected with the written 
approval of the faculty adviser, provided a minimum of 16 semester 
hours in the case of the major, or of 12 in that of the minor be 
taken in one subject. Such a composite will be permitted in 

Natural Science (any combination of Physics, Chemistry and 
Biology fulfilling the above requirement) ; 

Foreign Language (Latin in combination with French or 
Spanish) ; 

Mathematics (in combination with Physics) ; 

Social Science (History in combination with Sociology). 

B. S. WITH A MAJOR IN EDUCATION 



To satisfy the scholastic requirements for the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science with a major in Education, each candidate must pass 
128 hours of work. The following courses are prescribed for can- 
didates for this degree: 

Cultural: Semester Hours 

English 12 

Modern Language 12 

Mathematics 6 

Introduction to History 6 

Sociology or Economics 6 

Natural Science 8 

Philosophy 18 



74 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Professional: Semester Hours 

The American School System 2 

Principles of Secondary Education 2 

Extra-curricular Activities ~ 3 

Principles of High School Teaching 3 

Tests and Measures 2 

Educational Psychology 3 

Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (minor field)-.. 2 

Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (major field).... 3 

Observation and Practice Teaching 3 

Teaching Major and Minor: 

In addition to the above requirements, the candidate must 
have completed a major of 24 semester hours in one approved teach- 
ing field and a minor of 18 semester hours in another. The cultural 
courses mentioned above may be counted towards the completion of 
this major and minor. For this degree, the major must be selected 
from group I below, the minor, from group II. 

Group I: Group II: 
English Spanish 

French Biology 

History Physics 

Mathematics Commerce 

Chemistry 

A composite major of 32 semester hours or minor of 24 in 
cognate subjects may be selected with the written approval of the 
faculty adviser, provided a minimum of 16 semester hours in the 
case of the major, or of 12 in the case of the minor be taken in one 
subject. Such a composite will be permitted in 

Natural Science (any combination of Physics, Chemistry, and 
Biology fulfilling the above requirement) ; 

Mathematics (in combination with Physics) ; 

Social Science (History in combination with Sociology). 



CATALOGUE 



75 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM OF COURSES FOR THE B. S. 
WITH A MAJOR IN EDUCATION. 

FRESHMAN 



First Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Modern language 3 hours 

Natural Science 

(Biology 

recommended) 4 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

(introduction to 

History 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Modern Language .... 3 hours 
Natural Science 

(Biology 

recommended) 4 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Introduction to 

History 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



17 
SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester — 

hours English 3 hours 

hours Modern Language .... 3 hours 

Mathematics (5) or 
hours Natural Science .... 4 hours 

hours History 3 hours 

Introduction to 

hour Philosophy 2 hours 

The American School 

hours System 2 hours 

hour — 

17 



17 

First Semester — 

English 3 

Modern Language .... 3 
Mathematics (5) or 

Natural Science .... 4 

History 3 

Introduction to 

Philosophy 1 

Introduction to 

Education 2 

Public Speaking 1 

17 

JUNIOR 

First Semester — Second Semester- 
General Psychology .. 4 hours Educational 
Social Science Psychology 

Sociology or Social Science 

Economics 3 hours Sociology or 

Principles of secondary Economics 

Education 2 hours Principles of High 

Extra-Curricular School Teaching 

Activities 3 hours Approved Electives 

Tests and 

Measures 2 hours 

Approved Elective .... 2 hours 



3 hours 



3 hours 



. 3 

. 7 

16 



hours 
hours 



16 



76 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



SENIOR 

First Semester — Second Semester — 

General Philosophy 4 hours 

'Psychology 2 hours Materials and methods 

Philosophy 4 hours of High School 

Materials and methods Teaching 3 hours 

of High School Observation and 

Teaching 2 hours Practice Teaching .. 1 % hrs. 

Observation and Approved Electives .. 7 hours 

Practice Teaching .. IY2 hrs. ■ — 

Approved Electives - 7 hours 15^ 

16 y 2 

N. B. For a Secondary Class B Certificate to teach in Ala- 
bama, the State Department of Education requires: 

A major of 24 semester hours in education, 

A major of 24 semester hours in an approved subject and, 

A minor of 18 semester hours in another approved subject. 

B. S. WITH A MAJOR IN COMMERCIAL EDUCATION. 



To satisfy the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science with a major in Commercial Education, each candidate must 
pass 128 hours of work. The following courses are prescribed for 
candidates for this degree: 

Cultural: Semester Hours. 

English 12 

Modern Foreign Language 12 

Mathematics 6 

Introduction to History 6 

Sociology or Economics 6 

Natural Science 8 

Philosophy (including 6 in Psychology) 18 

Professional: Semester Hours. 

Introduction to Education 2 

The American School System 2 

Principles of Secondary Education 2 

Extra-curricular Activities 3 

Principles of High School Teaching 3 

Tests and Measures 2 

Educational Psychology 3 



CATALOGUE 77 



Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (minor field) .. 2 
Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (major field).... 3 
Observation and Practice Teaching 3 

Teaching Major and Minor: 

In addition to the above requirements, the candidate must have 
completed a major of 24 semester hours in one approved field and 
a minor of 18 semester hours in another. Cultural courses men- 
tioned above, if in the chosen teaching fields, may be counted to- 
wards the completion of the teaching major and minor. For this 
degree, the major must be Commerce. The minor must be selected 
from the following group: 



English 


Mathematics 


French 


Biology 


Spanish 


Chemistry 


History 


Physics 




Economics 



A composite minor of 24 semester hours in cognate subjects 
may be selected with the written approval of the faculty adviser, 
provided a minimum of 12 semester hours be taken in one subject. 
Such a composite will be permitted in: 

Natural science (any combination of physics, chemistry and 
biology fulfilling the above requirement) ; 

Mathematics (in combination with physics) ; 

Social science (history in combination with sociology) ; 

Commerce and economics, (in any combination fulfilling the 
above requirement). 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM OF COURSES FOR THE B. S. 
WITH A MAJOR IN COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 

FRESHMAN 

First Semester — Second Semester — 

English 3 hours English 3 hours 

Modern Foreign Modern Foreign 

Language 3 hours Language 3 hours 

Introduction to Introduction to 

History 3 hours History 3 hours 

Business Business 

Mathematics 3 hours Mathematics 3 hours 

Accounting Accounting 

Principles 3 hours Principles 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 'Public Speaking 1 hour 

16 16 



78 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Modern Foreign 

Language 3 hours 

Advanced 

Accounting 3 hours 

Natural Science 

(Biology 

recommended) 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Introduction to 

Philosophy 1 hour 

Introduction to 

Education 2 hours 



Second Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Modern Foreign 

Language 3 hours 

Advanced 

Accounting 3 hours 

Natural Science 

(Biology 

recommended) 4 hours 

Introduction to 

Philosophy 2 hours 

The American School 

System 2 hours 



17 



17 



First Semester — 






General Psychology ... 


4 


hours 


Principles of 






Economics 


3 


hours 


Corporation Finance . 


3 


hours 


Principles of Second- 






ary Education 


2 


hours 


Extra-curricular 






Activities 


3 


hours 


Tests and 






Measures 


2 


hours 



JUNIOR 

Second Semester — 
Educational 

Psychology 3 hours 

Principles of 

Economics 3 hours 

Corporation Finance .. 3 hours 
Principles of High 

School Teaching .... 3 hours 
Approved Elective .... 3 hours 



15 



First Semester — 
General Psychology .. 

Philosophy 

Business Law 

Statistics 

Materials and 

Methods of High 

School Teaching .... 
Observation and Prac 

tice Teaching 



17 

SENIOR 

Second Semester — 

2 hours Philosophy 4 hours 

4 hours Marketing 3 hours 

3 hours Business Law 3 hours 

3 hours Materials and 

Methods of High 

School Teaching .... 3 hours 

2 hours Observation and Prac- 
tice Teaching 1% hrs. 

1% hrs. Approved Elective .... 2 hours 



15% 



16% 



CATALOGUE 79 



N. B. For a Secondary Class B Certificate to teach in Alabama, 
the State Department of Education requires: 
A major of 24 semester hours in education, 
A major of 24 semester hours in an approved subject and 
A minor of 18 semester hours in another approved subject. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM OF COURSES IN 
EDUCATION 

FIRST SEMESTER SOPHOMORE WINTER SESSION 

Education 297 Introduction to Education 2 hours a week 

SECOND SEMESTER SOPHOMORE SPRING SESSION 

Education 202 The American School System 2 hours a week 

THIRD SEMESTER JUNIOR WINTER SESSION 

Education 335 Principles of Secondary Education 2 hours a week 
Education 335X Extra-curricular activities 2 hours lecture and 

3 hours laboratory a week. 
Education 321 Tests and measures 2 hours a week 

FOURTH SEMESTER JUNIOR SPRING SESSION 

Education 336 Principles of High School Teaching 3 hours a wk. 
Education 308E Educational Psychology 3 hours a week 

FIFTH SEMESTER SENIOR WINTER SESSION 

Education 400M Materials and Methods of High School Teach- 

ing (Minor Field) 2 hours a week 
Education 435T Observation and Practice Teaching IY2 hours 

a week 

SIXTH SEMESTER SENIOR SPRING SESSION 

Education 400M Materials and Methods of High School Teaching 

(Major Field) 3 hours a week. 
Education 436T Observation and Practice Teaching IY2 hours 

a week 
COURSES OF STUDY IN EDUCATION 

Education 297. Introduction to Education 

Two Semester Hours. 

Winter session, Monday and Wednesday at 1:00 p. m. Room 
107, Mobile Hall. Fr. De Potter. 

This is a survey course which is required of all student teach- 
ers during their first semester. Its purpose is to acquaint the stu- 
dents with the various special fields of the science of education. It 
begins with the historical development of education, and indicates 
the various philosophies of education as they are encountered. It 
studies the various national and state systems in our own and in 
foreign countries, with special emphasis on the great three-fold di- 



80 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



vision in use in this country and comprising elementary, second- 
ary and higher education. It insists upon a knowledge of the learn- 
ing process as discovered in the study of general and educational 
psychology. Finally it considers the strategic position of education 
in the battle against the social evils of the present day. 
Education 202. The American School System. 

Two Semester Hours. 

Spring Session, Monday and Wednesday at 1:00 p. m. Room 
107, Mobile Hall. Fr. De Potter. 

This course begins with a study of the origin and development 
of the various school systems, denominational and public, in the 
United States, section by section. It then takes up the advance- 
ment made in elementary, secondary and higher education. The 
treatment of such topics as professional education, technical and 
agricultural education, the preparation of teachers, art and manual 
education, commercial education, educational extension, profession- 
al societies, regional and national educational associations is in- 
cluded in the course. 

Education 308E. Educational Psychology. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring Session, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday at 2:00 p. m. 
Room 106, Mobile Hall. Fr. Bassich. 

This course considers the nature, function and measurement of 
the original tendencies of the individual, and the modifications of 
them which the school endeavors to bring about. That this purpose 
may be, better effected, the student is directed in the study of the 
laws of learning, the learning curve, the efficiency and permanence 
of learning, transfer of training, the result of exercise, the meas- 
urement of achievement, the use of tests, the new type examina- 
tions. 

Education 321. Tests and Measurements. 

Two Semester Hours. 

Winter Session, Tuesday and Friday at 2:00 p. m. Room 107 
Mobile Hall. Fr - Bassich. 

Course 321 first discusses the nature of tests and the problems 
which may be profitably dealt with by means of them, simple 
methods of handling the results of tests and common mistakes to be 
avoided. It then takes up some of the best and most representa- 
tive tests in the various school subjects, and some tests of ability, 
particularly of general intelligence, and emphasizes the practical 
use of test results. The course concludes with a consideration of 
the principle of the organization of test work and of its relation to 
practical problems. 



CATALOGUE 81 



Education 335. Principles of Secondary Education. 

Two Semester Hours. 

Winter session, Monday and Thursday at 2:00 p. m. Room 107 
Mobile Hall. Not given 1932-1933. 

This course studies the individual at the stage of his secondary 
education, his native and acquired tendencies to action, and deduces 
principles by which the teacher may be guided in his attempt to 
direct the interest and secure the attention of the pupil. Among 
the topics considered are: the aims in instruction, the class exercise; 
the essentials of good questioning, the modes of instruction; the 
importance of study; the prelection or assignment; the repetition or 
recitation; standards and measurements; the individual and social 
elements in secondary instruction. 

Education 336. Principles of High School Teaching . 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring session, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday at 2:00 p. m. 
Room 107 Mobile Hall. Not given 1932-1933. 

The purpose, of this course is to give the student of education 
the proper concept of the present day high school. While course 
335 deals with the essentials of technique for the apprentice teacher, 
course 336 discusses some of the procedures which go to make up 
the professional skill of the master teacher. Among these are super- 
vision of pupil study, teaching how to study, the technique of visual 
instruction, socialized class procedure, project teaching and the ad- 
justment of instruction to the varying abilities of the pupil. 

Education 435-436T. Observation and Practice Teaching'. 

One and one-half or Two Semester Hours each Session. Sched- 
ule to be arranged by each student individually with the head of the 
department of education. 

In order to supplement its instruction in educational principles, 
aims, methods, curricula and procedure, and to cultivate professional 
skill in teaching, Spring Hill College has secured the cooperation of 
the Spring Hill High School. Through the courtesy of its adminis- 
trators and teachers, Spring Hill High School thus becomes the 
proving ground for the professional students of the department of 
education, who have free access to its classrooms for observation of 
the methods practiced therein and for supervised practice teach- 
ing. Cooperating with the State Department of Education, Spring 
Hill College requires that its candidates for degrees with a major in 
education present a minimum of 3 semester hours in observation 
and practice teaching with a minimum of 30 full periods of class 
teaching. 



82 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Education M. Materials and Methods of High School Teaching. 

Winter session, two semester hours; Spring session, three semes- 
ter hours. 

The object of this course is to give the student an intimate 
knowledge of the reason, aim and material of the chief subjects 
found in the high school curricula, and the recognized methods by 
which they are taught. The student should emerge from the course 
with a correct perspective of the subject studied and with such a 
comprehensive view of its proper distribution that he should be ca- 
pable of constructing in it a satisfactory curriculum. Students are 
advised to choose their major and minor teaching fields at the be- 
ginning of their sophomore year, and are requred to do so before 
its close, and to notify the head of the department of education con- 
cerning their choice. 

Education 335X. Extra-curricular Activities. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Winter session, Tuesday and Thursday at 1:00 p. m. Labora- 
tory, Monday and Wednesday at 1:00 p. m. Room 107 Mobile Hall, 
Mr. Donahue. 

The purpose of this course is to instruct the students of edu- 
cation in the importance of student participation in school activities 
outside the classroom. Considerable time is devoted to the theory 
and practice of the teaching of athletic sports, football, baseball, 
basketball, track sports and boxing. The fundamental principles of 
various football systems, rules, training, special plays are among 
the topics dealt with. There is explicit insistence upon the transfer 
of training in punctuality, promptitude in the execution of plays 
and other desirable qualities from the field of play to the regular 
work of the school and of after life. Among other student activi- 
ties discussed, are the following: student council, class organization; 
school clubs — the sodality, the classical association, the scientific 
club, the poetry club, the dramatic club, the literary scoiety, the 
debating society; musical organizations — the choir, the glee club 
the band , the orchestra; the assembly; the commencement; the li- 
brary; the study hall; the athletic association; school publications — 
the annual, the school magazine; publicity and public relations. 

Education 460M. Materials and Methods of Teaching Com- 
mercial Subjects. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring session, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday at 1:00 p. m. 
Room 110 Mobile Hall. 

Education 462M. Materials and Methods of Teaching English. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring session, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday at 1:00 p. m. 



CATALOGUE 83 



Room 207 Mobile Hall. 

Education 466M. Materials and Methods of Teaching History. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring session, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday at 1:00 p. m. 
Room 210 Mobile Hall. 

Education 469BM. Materials and Methods of Teaching Biology 

Two Semester Hours. 

Winter session, Tuesday and Thursday at 1:00 p. m. Biology 
lecture room, Yenni Hall. 

Education 469PM. Materials and Methods of Teaching Physics. 

Two Semester Hours. 

Winter session, Tuesday and Friday at 1:00 p. m. Physics lec- 
ture room, Yenni Hall. 

Education 470CM. Materials and Methods of Teaching Chem- 
istry. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring session, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at 1:00 p. 
m. Chemistry lecture room, Yenni Hall. 

Education 472M. Materials and Methods of Teaching French. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring session, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday at 1:00 p. m. 
Room 110, Mobile Hall. 

Education 475M. Materials and Methods of Teaching Latin. 

Two Semester Hours. 

Winter session, Monday and Friday at 1:00 p. m. Room 106, 
Mobile Hall. 

Education 477M. Materials and Methods of Teaching Spanish. 

Two Semester Hours. 

Winter session, Wednesday and Friday at 9:00 a. m. Room 
106, Mobile Hall. 

Education 494M. Materials and Methods of Teaching Physi- 
cal Education. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring session, Tuesday, and Thursday at 1:00 p. m. Labora- 
tory, Monday and Wednesday at 1:00 p. m. 

(History 101 A. Introduction to History. 

Three semester hours. 

Winter session, Monday at 1:00 p. m., Tuesday and Friday at 
9 a. m. 

The aim of this course is to orient the student so that he may 
view in its proper setting the status of the world today. That this 
may be done in a reasonable way, the contributory causes to the 



84 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

present intellectual, moral and religious culture are traced from 
their probable origins. In the same way the progressive stages 
of the world's economic and political development as recorded in 
history are followed from the remote past to the present actual 
situation. 

History 102. Introduction to History. 

Three semester hours. 

Spring session, Monday at 1:00 p. m. and Tuesday and Friday 
at 9:00 a. m. 

This course is a continuation of course 1A. It reviews the 
revolution in industry brought on by the machine age, with the 
new view point of human values in the disregard of inherent rights. 
It points out the sociological and economic problems arising from 
the centralization of capital and mass production which followed 
in the wake of new discoveries in science and inventions in indus- 
trial machines. The new facilities in world communication and 
transportation are considered together with the complicated sys- 
tems of distribution and finance which they connote. The social 
conditions of the world and more especially of the United States 
are treated, and the various fields of study which specifically deal 
with the problems discussed in this course are pointed out to the 
student. 

General Psychology 307P. 

Four semester hours. 

Winter session, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday at 3:00 p. m., 
Wednesday at 2:00 p. m. 

This course deals with the laws by which human reason must 
be governed in order to act conformably to its nature, and so to 
form correct and true judgments. It considers separately two dis- 
tinct sets of laws: one that our thought may be correct and con- 
sistent or conformed to the necessary laws of thinking; the other 
that our thought may be true or conformed to the objective reality 
of things. 

General Psychology 407. Philosophy 8. 

Two semester hours. 

Winter session, Monday and Thursday at 11:00 a. m. 

Psychology 407 studies that principle in man by which he lives, 
feels, thinks and wills. It takes account, however, only of those 
vital acts which are characteristic of man and distinguish him from 
all other living things in the visible world. The student is first 
furnished with the data which his own consciousness and that of 
other men supply as to the characters of the vital acts of thought 
and violation. From these acts he is directed to reason back to the 
nature of the principle from which they proceed, its relation to the 



CATALOGUE 



85 



body, its origin. From what it does, he gathers what it must be. 
Thus he gets a natural knowledge of the essence, origin and destiny 
of the soul scientifically, by both induction and deduction. 

PROGRAM OF COURSES IN EDUCATION 



1932-1933 



Mon. 



Tues. 



Wed. 



Thurs. 



Fri. 



Hour 1st 2nd 

Sem. Sem. 
P. M. Education 



1st 2nd 1st 2nd 1st 2nd 1st 2nd 

Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. 

Education Education Education Education 



1:00 297 202 308E 297 

308E 462M 

469BM 468M 
469PM 472M 
335X 494M 335X 494M 335X 



202 308E 

462M 462M 

468M 468M 

469BM 472M 469PM 472M 

494M 335X 494M 



2:00 
1933-1934 



321 



321 



Hour 



A. M. 



9:00 



477M 



477M 



P. M. 



1:00 



297 



202 
308E 



297 



308E 

460M 

475M 466M 

470M 



202 



470M 



308E 
460M 

466M 475M 
470M 



460M 
466M 



335X 494M 335X 494M 335X 494M 335X 494M 



2:00 



335 336 



321 



336 



335 



336 321 



Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 



202 
297 
308E 
321 
335 
335X 
336 
436T 
460M 






Education 462M 



KEY 

The American School System. 
Introduction to Education. 
Educational Psychology. 
Tests and Measures. 
Principles of Secondary Education. 
Extra-curricular activities. 
Principles of High School Teaching. 
Observation and Practice Teaching. 
Materials and Methods of Teaching Commer- 
cial Subjects. 
Materials and Methods of Teaching English. 



86 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Education 466M Materials and Methods of Teaching History. 

Education 468M Materials and Methods of Teaching Mathe- 

matics. 

Education 469BM Materials and Methods of Teaching Biology. 

Education 469PM Materials and Methods of Teaching Physics. 

Education 470CM Materials and Methods of Teaching Chemistry. 

Education 472M Materials and Methods of Teaching French. 

Education 475M Materials and Methods of Teaching Latin. 

Education 477M Materials and Methods of Teaching Spanish. 

Education 49 4M Materials and Methods of Teaching Physical 

Education. 

SUBJECTS IN COURSE 
DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

BIOLOGY: 
101-2 General biology. 

201 Comparative anatomy of the vertibrates. 
302 Vertibrate embryology. 

202 Microscopic technique. 
301 Bacteriology. 

401 Histology. 

402 Introduction to general physiology. 
404 General physiology. 

The Mendel club. 
Introduction to research. 
104 Genetics. 

CHEMISTRY: 

101 General inorganic chemistry. 

102 Elementary qualitative analysis. 

201 Qualitative analysis. 

202 Quantitive analysis. 
203-4 Organic chemistry. 

301 Physical Chemistry. 

302 Materials of engineering products. 
305-6 Physiological Chemistry. 

COMMERCE: 

Commerce 101 Economic geography. 

Commerce 102E Economic history of the United States. 

Commerce 111 -112 Accounting principles. 

Commerce 201E-202E Principles of economics. 

Commerce 211 -212 Advanced accounting. 

Commerce 221 -222 Business law. 

Commerce 301E-302E Corporation finance. 



CATALOGUE 



87 



Commerce 311 Accounting systems. 

Commerce 312 Auditing and C. P. A. problems. 

Commerce 321 Public finance. 

Commerce 322 Banking. 

Commerce 33 IE Transportation principles. 

Commerce 332E Foreign trade. 

Commerce 401E Elements of statistics. 

Commerce 402 Business administration. 

Commerce 411 Cost accounting. 

Commerce 412 Income tax procedure. 

Commerce 421 Advertising and salesmanship. 

Commerce 42 2E Principles of marketing. 

Commerce 431 Insurance. 

Commerce 432E Public utilities. 

Commerce 441 Real estate. 

Commerce 442 Investments. 

DRAWING: 

101-2 Mechanical drawing. 
106- 

201 Descriptive geometry. 
205 Topographical drawing. 

202 Machine drawing. 
103-4 Anatomical drawing. 
204 Architectural drawing. 
301 Architectural design. 

EDUCATION: 

The American School System. 

Introduction to Education. 

Educational Psychology. 

Tests and Measures. 

Principles of Secondary Education. 

Extra-curricular Activities. 

Principles of High School Teaching. 

Observation and Practice Teaching. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Commer- 
cial Subjects. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching English. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching History. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Mathe- 
matics. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Biology. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Physics. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Chemistry. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching French. 



Education 202 
Education 297 
Education 308E 
Education 321 
Education 335 
Education 335X 
Education 336 
Education 436T 
Education 460M 

Education 462M 
Education 466M 
Education 468M 

Education 469BMi 
Education 469PM 
Education 475M 
Education 472M 



88 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Eduction 475M Materials and Methods of Teaching Latin. 
Education 477M Materials and Methods of Teaching Spanish. 
Education 494M Materials and Methods of Teaching Physical 
Education. 

ENGLISH: 

1 Rhetoric and composition. 

101 Advanced rhetoric. 

102 Poetry. 

201 Oratory. 

202 The Drama. 

301 The English novel. 

302 Shakespeare. 

303 Aesthetics and literary criticism. 

304 The essay. 
401-2 Journalism. 

305-6 English and American literature. 

EVIDENCES OF RELIGION: 

101 Christian revelation; the Church. 

102 The Church; God and salvation. 

201 Creation and redemption. 

202 Grace and the sacraments. 

301 The sacraments; morality and virtue; escatology. 

302 Divine worship; Christian perfection. 

401 Sacred scripture. 

402 Scripture reading; ecclesiastical history. 

FRENCH: 

101-2 Elementary French. 

201-2 Intermediate French. 

301 Modern French prose. 

302 French poetry of the nineteenth century. 
402 The French drama. 

GERMAN: 

101-2 Elementary German. 

201-2 Intermediate German. 

301 German prose writers. 

401-2 The German epic. 

GREEK: 

1 For beginners. 

2 Xenophon. 



CATALOGUE 89 



101-2 Homer. 

201 Demosthenes. 

202 Demosthenes; Aeschylus. 

301 Plato. 

302 Herodotus, Thucydides. 

401 Sophocles. 

402 Aristophanes. 

HISTORY: 

History 101 A Introduction to history. 
History 102 A Introduction to history. 

101 Early medieval history. 

102 The middle ages. 

201 Renaissance and revolution. 

202 Europe since 1814. 

301 American history since the reconstruction period. 



LATIN: 



1-2 Elementary grammar. 

3 Cicero. 

4 Virgil. 

101-2 Virgil, Horace Cicero. 

201-2 Horace, Cicero. 

301 Horace, Virgil, Juvenal. 

302 Cicero, Quintilian. 

401 Plautus, Terrence. 

402 Pliny, Seneca. 

403 Ecclesiastical Latin. 



MATHEMATICS: 



1 Advanced algebra. 

2 Geometry. 

101 College algebra. 

102 Plane trigonometry. 

103 Spherical trigonometry. 

104 Surveying. 

201 Plane analytic geometry. 

202 Solid analytic geometry. 
204 Differential calculus. 

301 Integral calculus. 

302 Differential equations. 

303 Theory of definite integral. 



90 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

PHILOSOPHY: 

201 Introduction to logic. 

202 Introduction to epistomology. 
3 01- A Logic. 

301-B Criteriology or applied logic. 

302-A General metaphysics or ontology. 

302-B Cosmology. 

402 Special metaphysics. 
401 Psychology. 

403 General ethics. 

404 Special ethics. 

303 History of ancient and medieval philosophy. 

304 History of modern philosophy. 

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION: 

101-2 Comparative religion. 
201-2 Biblical criticism. 
301-2 Aanalysis of faith. 
401-2 Morality. 

PHYSICS: 

201-2 General physics. 

301-2 Advanced physics. 

303-4 Electricity and magnetism; radio activity; the electron 
theory. 

305-6 Experimental physics. 

403 Electric oscillations and electromagnetic waves; radio com- 
munication. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 
POLITICAL SCIENCE: 
101-2 American government. 
201-2 Party politics. 

301-2 American government and party politics. 
401-2 Constitutional law. 
403 Comparative government. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING: 

101 Principles of vocal expression. 

102 Gesture and technique of action. 

201 Argumentation and debating. 

202 The occasional public address. 

SOCIOLOGY: 
301 Social history. 

401-2 General sociology. 



CATALOGUE 91 



302 Social ethics. 
403-4 Organized charity. 

SPANISH: 

101-2 Elementary Spanish. 

201-2 Intermediate Spanish. 

301-2 Advanced Spanish. 

103-4 Commercial Spanish. 

303 Classical prose. 

304 Classical poetry. 

401 Modern prose. 

402 Modern poetry. 

403. Spanish drama and oratory. 

OBSERVATION AND PRACTICE TEACHING 



1. Every student who is preparing to teach is advised to select 
at the beginning of his Sophomore year the two high school sub- 
jects that he wishes to teach. The one which he prefers will be 
known as his major teaching field; the other, as his minor teach- 
ing field. He will be required to make his selection before the end 
of his Sophomore year, and to notify the head of the department of 
education concerning his choice. 

2. Every student will earn a minimum of twenty-four semes- 
ter hours in his major field, and a minimum of eighteen semester 
hours in his minor field. 

3. The student must take a course of three semester hours in 
the materials and methods of teaching his major subject, and of two 
semester hours in the materials and methods of teaching his minor 
subject. 

4. He will arrange with the head of the department of educa- 
tion to take observation and practice teaching in the high school in 
a class of either his major or his minor subject to the extent of three 
semester hours or more, according to the requirements of the school 
system in which he plans to teach. After having made the arrange- 
ment with the departmental head, the student will report to the 
principal of the high school and then to the teacher to whose class 
he has been assigned for observation and practice teaching. 

5. The student will inform himself as to the number of se- 
mester hours of observation and practice teaching required in the 
State or the school system in which he is to teach. If four semester 
hours are demanded, the student will be required to be present in 
the high school class for a full period on each of two successive days. 
The first day, he will observe; the second, he will himself conduct 



92 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

the class during the entire period. If he will be required to have 
only three semester hours in observation and practice teaching, he 
will observe during one-half of the period the first day, being pres- 
ent for the prelection or assignment for the following day. The sec- 
ond day, he must conduct the class during the entire period. This 
routine will be followed week after week for two semesters, the 
student teacher reporting the same days every week. A minimum 
of thirty full periods of supervised teaching will be required for 
credit. 

6. The student teacher is to pay strict attention to the super- 
vising teacher the first day, especially while the latter is giving the 
prelection or assignment. At the end of the period, he will inquire 
what the supervising teacher wishes him assign in the following per- 
iod. During the time of study, the student teacher will prepare 
carefully both the matter of the recitation (or repetition) which he 
is to conduct and that of the assignment (or prelection) which he is 
to give the following day. 

7. At the end of a period of practice teaching, or, preferably, 
at some other time in the course of the day, the student teacher 
will of his own accord go to the supervising teacher and ask for a 
criticism of his practice teaching. 

8. Once the student teacher has been assigned to a class for 
observation and practice teaching, the high school principal is re- 
quested to place his name on the class roll, and the supervising tea- 
cher, to check his presence or absence on the days on which he is 
expected to report, in the same way in which this is done for pupils. 

9. The supervising teacher is requested to point out the de- 
fects of the student teacher so that the latter may become aware of 
them and endeavor to remove or at least diminish them, and his good 
qualities so that he recognize them, evaluate them correctly and de- 
velop them. 

10. The supervising teacher is requested to rate the student 
teacher and to give the grade of the latter to the principal at the 
end of each month. In giving this grade, the supervising teacher is 
asked to base his judgment upon the following qualities as mani- 
fested by the student teacher: 

(a) Personality (giving evidence of authority, tact, sym- 
pathy and other desirable qualities.) 

(b) Control of subject matter. 

(c) Control of method. 



CATALOGUE 93 



Student Organizations 

As college education is accomplished not only dur- 
ing the hours of class, but also in no small degree during 
the students' intercourse with each other at other periods, 
the College heartily encourages all student organizations 
which help to develop in the student initiative, self- 
reliance and leadership in organized religious and social 
movements, qualities which are expected of college men 
generally. 

The policy of the faculty with regard to all kinds 
of college activities is that a student's first duty in col- 
lege is attention to study, and that no other student activ- 
ity should be allowed to interfere with this main purpose 
of college life. 

ELIGIBILITY RULES 

Students taking part in dramatic performances, pub- 
lic debates, oratorical or elocution contests and intercol- 
legiate athletics are subject to the following eligibility 
rules: (1) Actual class attendance and application must 
be satisfactory; (2) Students must have no conditions 
and no failures. 

SPRING HILL STUDENT COUNCIL 

The Spring Hill Student Council is elected by the 
Student Body to safeguard the honor and traditions of 
the College and to promote and direct its activities, with 
the approval of the faculty. 

MEMBERS 

Warren Aitkens Senior Member 

Joseph Bilgere Senior Member 

Thomas Gaughan Junior Member 

Guy Kaufman Junior Member 

Albert Bien Sophomore Member 

Carl Shirk : Sophomore Member 

Joseph Martin Freshman Member 

OFFICERS 

Warren Aitkens President 

Joseph Bilgere Vice-President 

Thomas Gaughan Secretary-Treasurer 



94 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

SODALITY OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION. 

The purpose of this Sodality is to develop Christian 
character under the protection of the Mother of Christ 
and to cultivate the lay apostolate. The Sodality en- 
deavors to attain this end by conducting weekly meetings 
at which the office of the Blessed Virgin is recited and 
instructions are given by the Director and by organizing 
sections for the promotion of special activities. Meetings 
are "held Wednesday night at 8 :30. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Edward T. Cassidy, S. J Director 

Huyet Fitzsimmons Perfect 

James Hynes Secretary 

APOSTLESHIP OF PRAYER— LEAGUE OF THE SACRED 

HEART. 

This Association aims at training its members in the 
practice of prayer and other good works by seeking in 
them the interests of the Sacred Heart of Jesus: "The 
glory of God and the good of souls. '" Meetings are held 
once a month. 

Rev. Edward T. Cassidy, S. J Director 

THE MENDEL CLUB. 

The object of this club is to foster interest in biologi- 
cal research work. Meetings are held once a week, at 
which papers are read by individual members, dealing 
with the results of private work. Twice a month, some 
eminent biologist or physician is invited to address the 
club. The club publishes a monthly paper, "The Men- 
delian", devoted to biological subjects. 

OFFICERS. 

Rev. Patrick H. Yancey, S. J Moderator 

Paul Kurzweg President 

Charles V. Shannon Vice-President 

John L. Boland Secretary 

Thomas Gaughan Treasurer 



CATALOGUE 95 



THE SPRINGHILLIAN. 

The Springhillian, formerly a quarterly publication, 
is now published monthly. It is edited by the students 
under the direction of a member of the faculty to encour- 
age self-expression and literary ambition among the stu- 
dents, and to record current events of the College. 

STAFF 

H. L. Crane, S. J. Faculty Director 

B. J. Washichek : Editor-in-Chief 

G. McHardy and J. Tyrrell Associate Editors 

C. P. Martin Literary 

William Eckert Business Manager 

J. Boland and R. Lawler Sports 

William Coffey Exchanges 

J. McCown and P. Norville, Jr Advertising 

F. Gouaux, T. Hicks, E. Stuardi Circulation 

R. Touart, J. Potts, J. Caviezel, R. Lawler, L. P. Artman ... -Reporters 

THE PORTIER LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETY. 

This Society is named in memory of the learned and 
saintly prelate, the Rt. Rev. Michael Portier, D.D., first 
Bishop of Mobile, who founded the College in 1830. 

Membership is open to all students and is attained 
by those who demonstrate their literary ability to the 
satisfaction of the Society. 

The members hold weekly meetings on Sunday at 
8:30 P. M. at which they engage in literary and forensic 
exercises. They also stage entertainments for the student 
body at intervals during the year and a public dramatic 
production once a year. The College Debating Team is 
chosen from this Society. 

OFFICERS 

B. J. Washichek President 

Dennis Sullivan Vice-President 

Gordon McHardy Secretary 

J. McCown Treasurer 

F. Lott Librarian 



96 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Spring Hill endeavors to keep in touch with its for- 
mer students, and takes pride in their achievements. The 
College has been greatly helped by certain organizations 
formed by the Alumni in different cities for the purpose 
of fostering the recollections of their college days, and 
working for the interest of their Alma Mater. These are : 

Augusta Spring Hill College Club 
Georgia Club of Spring Hill College 
New Orleans Spring Hill College Club 
Thibodaux Spring Hill College Club 
Montgomery Spring Hill College Club. 
Washington Spring Hill Club 
Chicago Spring Hill College Club 
New York Alumni of Spring Hill College, Inc. 
Mobile Alumni Association of Spring Hill College. 
The St. Louis Chapter of the Alumni Association of 
Spring Hill College. 



CATALOGUE 97 



One Hundredth and First 
Annual Commencement 

OF 

Spring Hill College 

FRIDAY, MAY 29, 1931 
COLLEGE CAMPUS 

Spring Hill College 

PROGRAM 

Grand March — "Victory March" 

Rev. C. C. Chapman, S. J. 

The Spring Hill Orchestra 

Address Rev. Joseph M. Walsh, S. J. 

Address to Graduates Senator John H. Bankhead 

"Alma Mater Song" Prof. A. J. Suffich, Mus. B. 

The Spring Hill Orchestra 

AWARD OF MEDALS 

"Purple and White" 

J. H. Hynes and Rev. C. C. Chapman, S. J. 

The Spring Hill Orchestra 
Valedictory Francis James Gremillion 

DEGREES CONFERRED 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Thomas Lundon Bailey Claude Joseph Stallworth 

Francis James Gremillion Ward Laurent Tilly 

George Westerfield Metzger George Owen Twellmeyer 

Wiftiam Joseph Sneeringer Alphonse Hays Zieman 



98 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

George Washington Bourgeois Warren Clayton Stephens, Jr. 
Alexander John Brown, Jr. Aloysius Edwin Stuardi 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE 

Joseph Costa, Jr. Charles Joseph Owens, Jr. 

Victor Heinz Lott Ross Charles Schilleci 

Thomas Henry McPhillips, Jr. Robert Joseph Tucker 
William Henry Murray, Jr. 

"Centennial March" Prof. A. J. Staub, Mus. D. 

The Spring Hill Orchestra 

Prizes 

THE JOSEPH BLOCK MEMORIAL MEDAL, for proficiency in 
Music was founded by his children: Edward Block of New York, 
Alexander Block, Mrs. Bettie Haas, Mrs. Emma Eichold, Mrs. 
Fannie B. Simon of Mobile. 

This medal was won in 1931 by James H. Hynes. 

THE BISHOP O'SULLIVAN MEMORIAL MERAL, founded in 
honor of the Rt. Rev. Jeremiah 0' Sullivan, Bishop of Mobile, 
for excellence in Christian Doctrine and Ecclesiastical History. 
The medal was won in 1931 by Bernard J. Washichek. 
Next in merit, John O'Mahony, John Solon. 

THE HUTCHINSON MEDAL, founded by Miller Reese Hutchinson, 
E. E., Ph.D., for the best thesis in Philosophy. 

This medal was won in 1931 by William J. Sneeringer. 
Next in merit, Alphonse H. Zieman. 

THE MERILH MEDAL, founded by Edmund H. Merilh, B. S. '17, of 
New Orleans, La., for the best English essay. 

This medal was won in 1931 by Claude J. Stallworth. 
Next in merit, William J. Sneeringer, James Hynes. 

THE WALSH MEMORIAL MEDAL, founded in memory of William 
A. Walsh, A. B. '08, for execellence in Oratory. 
Not awarded. 

THE O'CALLAGHAN MEDAL, donated by Rev. J. McDermot, in 
memory of Rev. C. T. O'Callaghan, D.D., for proficiency in 



CATALOGUE 99 



Latin. 

Not awarded. 

THE MASTIN MEDAL, founded by William M. Mastin, M. D., LL. 
D., for the best paper in General and Organic Chemistry. 
This medal was won in 1931 by Claude J. Stallworth. 
Next in merit, John S. Daniel. 

THE STEWART MEDAL, donated by D. D. Stewart, M. D., for the 
best paper in Biology. 

This medal was won in 1931 by Charles V. Shannon. 
Next in merit, Claude J. Stallworth. 

THE DEPORTMENT MEDAL, founded by the Rt. Reverend Edward 
P. Allen, D. D., for Excellent Deportment, to be awarded by 
the votes of the students, with the approbation of the Faculty. 

This medal was won in 1931 by Huyet W. Fitzsimmons. 

Next in merit, Warren C. Stephens, Jr., Charles J. Owens, Jr., 

Joseph Bilgere, and Bernard Washichek. 

THE MATT RICE SERVICE CUP, founded by the Omicron Sigma 
Fraternity in memory of Matthew P. Rice, A. B. '19, a founder 
of the Fraternity and a loyal Springhillian, to be awarded to 
the student, who, during the year, has rendered the greatest 
service to the college. 

This cup was awarded in 1931 to Warren C. Stephens, Jr. 



100 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Class Roll 

FRESHMAN 



Alves, Walter J. 
Amman, Frederick C. 
Angle, Lanier P. 
Artman, Lawrence P., Jr. 
Aycock, Clarence C. 
Bassford, George E. 
Blake, William A. 
Blakesley, David J. 
Boland, J. L., Jr. 
Bowab, George 
Braswell, Jefferson B. 
Butt, Howard E. 
Byrne, Robert W. 
Callahan, John M. 
Caron, Richard J. 
Cassidy, Joseph P., Jr. 
Courreges, Frank 
Crane, Joseph 
Dacovich, Andrew G. 
Dark, Robert L. 
Demetropulos, Andrew 
DeNeefe, Thomas B. 
Digon, Benigno 
Dolese, Eugene D. 
Dowds, James J. 
Duffy, Charles W. 
Duffy, Daniel J. 
Dyas, Edmund C. 
Dyer, John L. 
Elsevier, William 
Ernst, Roy 
Fort, Marshall W. 
Gonzales, Arthur S. 
Gospodinovich, Matre 
Gross, Joseph C. 
Hanson, Gus R. 
Helmsing, Joseph H. 
Holbein, Henry 



Houston, Withers 
Irby, Walter Harold 
Kearns, Robert J. 
Kerrigan, Thomas E. 
Laurendine, Patrick, Jr. 
Lawler, Robert J. 
LeCompte, Eugene J. 
Martin, Joseph 
Maney, James P. 
McDonald, Herbert P., Jr. 
O'Donnell, James P. 
O'Neal, Edward H. 
Oppenheimer, Charles W. 
O'Shea, Francis 
O'Shea, Peter S. 
Palmes, Jack 
Patton, Brett R. 
Pearson, Edwin 
Powell, Marion 
Power, Daniel E. 
Robinson, Joseph 
Robinson, William R. 
Rowan, Carroll P., Jr. 
Ryan, Eugene B. 
Schenk, Joseph A., Jr. 
Sitterle, Julius M. 
Skeffington, Francis J. 
Smith, Charles 
Starke, John 
Sumrall, Harry T. 
Sweeney, Martin 0. 
Switzer, John E. 
Tampary, Theodore C. 
Thompson, Edward Leroy 
Trueblood, Elmer C. 
Van Antwerp, Garet, Jr. 
Waller, Charles 
Weinacker, Robert, Jr. 



CATALOGUE 



101 



Hollinger, Frank 0. 
Holman, Edward P. 
Hope, John C. 



White, William P. 
Willey, Robert 
Young, Jack 



SOPHOMORE 



Abell, Edward C. 
Adams, F. Valle 
Anders, John Klein 
Austin, John W. 
Bailey, Joseph 
Barry, John Joseph 
Bien, Albert 
Boehm, John G. 
Blount, Willard 



/ 



Brassell, Richard T. 
Broussard, John D. 
Chance, Huey L. 
Coffey, William G. 
Conner, Charles 
Crandell, James L. Jr. 
Daniel, John S. 
Davis, Fletcher, Jr. 
DeMouy, Louis F. 
Dischler, Nicholas 
Donahue, John Donald 
Driscoll, Raymond E. 
Dubuisson, Nicholas D. 
Duggar, Lloyd L. 
Eckert, William A. 
Faville, Henry C. 
Feore, James J. 
Goodman, Emmett 
Grigsby, Lee W. 
Guider, George W. 
Hale, Dr. Stephen F. 
Hardie, William P. 
Hartley, James A. 
Hogan, Jesse F. Jr. 



Houssiere, Charles, Jr. 
Houssiere, Ernest 
James, Sam A. 
Johnson, Ernest N. Jr. 
Kopecky, John William 
Leary, Thomas J. 
Leatherwood, Wilfred M. 
Maisel, Irving 
Martin, John B. 
Martin, Charles P. Jr. 
Mason, John H. 
McAuley, Marshall A. 
Muffuletto, Vincent P. 
North, William E. 
Petro, Daniel 
Potts, John P. 
Putnam, Richard J. 
Ricau, Gus J., Jr. 
Russell, Bernard P. 
Schwab, George Arthur 
Schwing, Jules B. 
Sekul, John 
Shirk, Carl R. 
Singleton, John B. 
Sneeringer, Leo Francis 
Spafford, James R. 
Stein, Thomas F., Jr. 
Stille, George C. 
Stuardi, Fred 
Vardaman, Douglas 
Vignes, Sparks, Jr. 
Vogelgesang, Edmund R. 
White, James M. 



102 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



JUNIOR 



Beyt, Lamar Jr. 
Breen, James P. 
Brett, William T. 
Brousse, Valsin L. Jr. 
Bruister, Howard J. 
Brunson, Woodrow W. 
Carlen, Ernest 
Caviezel, Joseph A., Jr. 
Copeland, Charles J. 
Corrigan, George F., Jr. 
Drury, George I. 
Fitzsimmons, Huyet W. 
Gaughan, Thomas J. 
Hynes, James H. 
Kaufman, Guy Charles 
Kurzweg, Paul H., Jr. 



Lovell, Edgar P. 
Mattei, Harry 
McDonough, William C. 
McFarland, M. Carter 
Newburn, George W. 
Ory, Oscar Richard 
Polito, Theodore J. 
Provosty, Wiendahl G. 
Richard, Charles W. 
Riley, Elmo M. 
Skeffington, William P. 
Smith, Wilton J. 
Tonsmeire, James M. 
Tyrrell, Joseph G. 
Wilson, John E. Jr. 



SENIOR 



Aitkens, Warren R. 
Alexander, Henry C. 
Bellande, Marcel R. 
Bilgere, Joseph E. 
Boylan, Gerald M. 
Cameron, Allan R., Jr. 
Foster, Granville W. 
Gibbons, Walter T. 
Gouaux, Frank T., Jr. 
Hargrove, Harry L. Jr. 
Henderson, Thomas B. 
Hicks, Thomas E. 
Kuppersmith, Oliver F. 
Kurhan, Louis 
Lott, Frank J. 
Low, George C. 
Lynch, James T. 
Mabry, Burnett F. 



Mattina, David Earl 
McCown, James H. 
McHardy, G. Gordon 
Norville, Peyton, Jr. 
O'Rourke, Edward V., Jr. 
O wings, Alfred J., Jr. 
Prevost, Buvens L. 
Pugh, Jesse S. 
Quinn, Joseph F. 
Shannon, Charles V. 
Stuardi, J. Edwin 
Sullivan, Dennis T. 
Sweeney, John P,. Jr. 
Touart, Richard G. 
VanNice, Harry B. 
Walsh, Joseph M. 
Washichek, Bernard J. 
Zukerman, Sidney W. 



POST GRADUATE 
Byrne, Thomas 

SPECIAL STUDENT 

Mills, Claude B. 

Stewart, Jones 



CATALOGUE 103 



Register of Students 

Abell, Edward C Kentucky 

Adams, F. Valle Texas 

Aitkens, Warren R Louisiana 

Alexander, Henry C Alabama 

Alves, Walter J Alabama 

Amman, Frederic C Louisiana 

Anders, John K Louisiana 

Angle, Lanier P Alabama 

Artman, Lawrence P., Jr - Florida 

Austin, John W Oklahoma 

Aycock, Clarence C Louisiana 

Bailey, Joseph A ...Pennsylvania 

Barry, John J Texas 

Bassford, George E Illinois 

Belllande, Marcel R Mississippi 

Beyt, Lamar Jr Louisiana 

Bien, Albert R Ohio 

Bilgere, Joseph E Alabama 

Blake, William A Alabama 

Blakesley, David J Louisiana 

Blount, Willard H Alabama 

Boehm, John S Missouri 

Boland, John Missouri 

Bowab, George Alabama 

Boylan, Gerald M Alabama 

Brassell, Richard T Alabama 

Braswell, Jefferson B Alabama 

Brett, William T Illinois 

Breen, James P. Tennessee 

Broussard, John D District of Columbia 

Brousse, Valsin L. Jr Louisiana 

Bruister, Howard J Alabama 

Brunson, Woodrow W Alabama 

Butt, Howard C Alabama 

Byrne, Robert W., Jr Alabama 

Byrne, Thomas Alabama 

Callahan, John M Arkansas 

Cameron, Allan R., Jr Alabama 

Carlen, Ernest J Alabama 

Caron, Richard J Illinois 



104 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Cassidy, Joseph P., Jr Louisiana 

Caviezel, Joseph A., Jr Alabama 

Chance, Huey L Alabama 

Coffey, William Illinois 

Conner, Charles J Louisiana 

Copeland, Charles J Arizona 

Corrigan, George F., Jr Florida 

Courreges, Frank R Louisiana 

Crandell, James, Jr Louisiana 

Crane, Joseph A Alabama 

Dacovich, Andrew G Alabama 

Daniel, John S Louisiana 

Dark, Robert, Jr Texas 

Davis, Fletcher E., Jr Alabama 

Demetropulos, Andrew Alabama 

DeMouy, Louis F Alabama 

DeNeefe, Thomas B Alabama 

Digon, Benigno, Jr Cuba 

Dischler, Nicholas Louisiana 

Dolese, Eugene D., Jr Louisiana 

Donahue, John Donald Alabama 

Dowds, James J Arkansas 

Driscoll, Raymond F Connecticut 

Drury, George I Kentucky 

Dubuisson, Nicholas D Louisiana 

Duffy, Charles W Illinois 

Duffy, Daniel J Illinois 

Duggar, Lloyd L Alabama 

Dyas, Edmund C Alabama 

Dyer, John L Louisiana 

Eckert, William A New York 

Elsevier, William Alabama 

Ernst, Roy Illinois 

Faville, Henry C, Jr Alabama 

Feore, James J Alabama 

Fitzsimmons, Huyet W Louisiana 

Fort, Marshall W Alabama 

Foster, Granville W Mississippi 

Gaughan, Thomas J Arkansas 

Gibbons, Walter T Tennessee 



CATALOGUE 105 



Goodman, Emmett F Alabama 

Gonzales, Arthur S Alabama 

Gospodinovich, Matre Mississippi 

Gouaux, Frank T., Jr Louisiana 

Grigsby, Lee W Kentucky 

Gross, Joseph C, Jr Louisiana 

Guider, George W Mississippi 

Hale, Dr. Stephen F Alabama 

Hanson, Gus. R Oklahoma 

Hardie, William P Florida 

Hargrove, Harry L., Jr Alabama 

Hartley, James A Alabama 

Helmsing, Joseph H Alabama 

Henderson, Thomas B Alabama 

Hicks, Thomas E Alabama 

Hogan, Jesse F., Jr , Alabama 

Holbein, Henry D Alabama 

Hollinger, Frank Alabama 

Holman, Edward P Oklahoma 

Hope, John C Alabama 

Houssiere, Charles, Jr Louisiana 

Houssiere, Ernest A Louisiana 

Houston, Withers Alabama 

Hynes, James H Illinois 

Irby, Walter Harold Alabama 

James, Sam A Florida 

Johnson, Ernest N Alabama 

Kaufman, Guy Charles « Louisiana 

Kearns, Robert J Alabama 

Kerrigan, Thomas E Tennessee 

Kopecky, John W Texas 

Kuppersmith, Oliver F Alabama 

Kurhan, Louis Massachusetts 

Kurzweg, Paul H., Jr Louisiana 

Laurendine, Patrick, Jr Alabama 

Lawler, Robert J Missouri 

Leary, Thomas J Maryland 

Leatherwood, Wilfred M Alabama 

LeCompte, Eugene J Louisiana 

Lott, Frank J Mississippi 



106 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Lovell, Edgar P Tennessee 

Low, George C Mississippi 

Lynch, James T Tennessee 

Mabry, Burnett F Mississippi 

Maisel, Irving Alabama 

Maney, James P Oklahoma 

Martin, John B Oklahoma 

Martin, Charles P Louisiana 

Martin, Joseph T Oklahoma 

Mason, John H Florida 

Mattei, Harry Alabama 

Mattina, David Earl Mississippi 

McAuley, Marshall A Alabama 

McCown, James H Alabama 

McDonough, William C Georgia 

McDonald, Herbert P., Jr Alabama 

McFarland, M. Carter Alabama 

McHardy, G. Gordon Louisiana 

Mills, Claude B Louisiana 

Muffuletto, Vincent P. Mississippi 

Newburn, George Alabama 

North, William E Alabama 

Norville, Peyton, Jr Alabama 

O'Donnell, James P Mississippi 

O'Neal, Edward H Alabama 

Oppenheimer, Charles W Florida 

O'Rourke, Edward V Alabama 

Ory, Oscar R Louisiana 

O'Shea, Francis M Mississippi 

O'Shea, Peter S Mississippi 

Owings, Alfred J Missouri 

Palmes, Jack Alabama 

Patton, Brett R Alabama 

Pearson, Edwin Alabama 

Petro, Daniel Alabama 

Polito, Theodore J Missouri 

Potts, John P. Kansas 

Powell, Marion Alabama 

Power, Daniel E Tennessee 

Prevost, Buvens L Louisiana 



CATALOGUE 107 



Provosty, Wiendhal G Louisiana 

Pugh, Jesse S Alabama 

Putnam, Richard J Louisiana 

Quinn, Joseph F Connecticut 

Richard, Charles W Alabama 

Ricau, Gus J ,..;... « .Louisiana 

Riley, Elmo M Alabama 

Robinson, Joe B Alabama 

Robinson, William R Louisiana 

Rowan, Carroll P., Jr Alabama 

Russell, Bernard P Alabama 

Ryan, Eugene B Iowa 



Schenk, Joseph A., Jr Missouri 

Schwab, George A - Louisiana 

Schwing, Jules B Louisiana 

Sekul, John Mississippi 

Shannon, Charles V Alabama 

Shirk, Carl R Louisiana 

Singleton, John B. Mississippi 

Sitterle, Julius M. Alabama 

Skeffington, Francis J Georgia 

Skeffington, William P Georgia 

Smith, Charles F Missouri 

Smith, Wilton J Louisiana 

Sneeringer, Leo Francis Alabama 

Spafford, James R. Alabama 

Starke, John Alabama 

Stein, Thomas F Alabama 

Stille, George C _ Alabama 

Stewart, Jones Alabama 

Stuardi, Fred Alabama 

Stuardi, J. Edwin Alabama 

Sullivan, Dennis T Alabama 

Sumrall, Harry T Alabama 

Sweeney, John P., Jr Alabama 

Sweeney, Martin O Alabama 

Switzer, John E Louisiana 

Tampary, Theodore C Alabama 

Thompson, Edward Leroy Alabama 

Tonsmeire, James M New York 



108 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Touart, Richard G Alabama 

Trueblood, Elmer C . Oklahoma 

Tyrrell, Joseph G. Alabama 

VanAntwerp, Garet, Jr Alabama 

VanNice, Harry B Missouri 

Vardaman, Douglas Mississippi 

Vignes, Sparks, Jr Mississippi 

Vogelgesang, Edmund R Alabama 

Waller, Charles, Jr , Alabama 

Walsh, Joseph M Alabama 

Washichek, Bernard J Alabama 

Weinacker, Robert, Jr Alabama 

White, William P Alabama 

White, James Alabama 

Willey, Robert S. Louisiana 

Wilson, John E., Jr Alabama 

Young, Jack M Arkansas 

Zukerman, Sidney W Alabama 




INDEX 
GENERAL CATALOGUE 

Page 

Administration 15 

Admission 21 

Alumni Associations 96 

Attendance 15 

Calendar 3 

Certificates In Education 66, 67 and 68 

Class Roll - 100 

Credentials 21 

Curriculum 9 

Degrees 25 and 59 

Degrees With a Major In Education 69, 72, 73 and 77 

Discipline 16 

Examinations 16 

Expenses 18 

General Information 6 

Grounds and Buildings 7, 8 and 59 

Historical Statement 6 and 65 

Location 6 

Objectives 58 

Officers of Instruction and Administration 4 and 5 

Prizes 98 

Register of Students 103 

Remarks on Regular Courses 33 

Requirements for Graduation 25 

Schedule for Regular Courses 28, 29 and 60 

Student Organizations 93 

Special Students 23 

Subjects in Courses 36, 60 and 79 

Systems of Education 10 

Testimonials 21 

Transcript of Record 17 



Spring Hill College 



Catalogue 1933-1934 




One Hundredth and Third Annual Announcement 



Spring Hill, Mobile County, Alabama 
March, 1933 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



A COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 
FOUNDED IN 1830 



CHARTERED AS A COLLEGE BY THE LEGISLATURE 
OF ALABAMA IN 1836 



Empowered by Pope Gregory XVI to Grant Degrees in 
Philosophy and Theology in 1840 



Member of the Southern Association of Colleges, 

The Association of American Colleges, and of 

The Association of Alabama Colleges 



Corporate Title: The President arid Trustees of the 

Spring Hill College, in the County of 

Mobile, Alabama. 



TRUSTEES OF SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

VERY REV. JOHN J. DRUHAN, S. J., 

Chairman 

REV. EDGAR J. BERNARD, S. J., 

Secretary 

REV. GEORGE G. McHARDY, S. J., 

Treasurer 

REV. E. CUMMINGS, S. J. 

REV. JAMES F. WHALEN, S. J. 



THE SPRING HILL COLLEGE FOUNDATION 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

VERY REV. JOHN J. DRUHAN, S. J., 

Chairman 

REV. GEORGE G. McHARDY, S. J., 

THOMAS M. STEVENS, LL. D. 

J. M. WALSH 

MATTHIAS M. MAHORNER, A. M., LL. B., LL. D. 



College Calendar 



1933— 

Sept. i 6 — Registration 

Sept< 7— Recitations and Lectures begin 

N 0V# i — Feast of All Saints 

Nov. 23 — Thanksgiving Day 

Dec 8 — Feast of the Immaculate Conception 

D ec# 20 — Christmas Recess begins 

1934— 

j an 4 — Lectures — Recitations resumed 

p e k # l — Second Semester begins 

Feb. 12, 13 — Shrovetide Holidays 

Man 19 — Feast of St. Joseph, Patron of the College 

M ar 28 — Easter Recess begins 
April 3 — Lectures — Recitations resumed 

May 10 — Feast of the Ascension 

May 25 — Commencement Exercises 
June 1 — Second Semester ends 



Officers of Administration 

REV. JOHN J. DRUHAN, S. J., 

President 

REV. EDWARD CUMMINGS, S. J., 

Dean 
REV. THOMAS J. SHIELDS, S. J., 

Prefect of Discipline 
REV. EDGAR J. BERNARD, S. J., 

Secretary 
REV. GEORGE G. McHARDY, S. J., 

Treasurer 

REV. EDWARD T. CASSIDY, S. J., 

Dean of Men 

LOUIS J. BOUDOUSQUE, B. S., 

Registrar 



Officers of Instruction 

REV. JOSEPH B. BASSICH, S. J., 
Professor of Education and Head of the Department 
JOHN L. BOLAND, 
Student Assistant in Biology 
LOUIS J. BOUDOUSQUIE, B S., 
Professor of Drawing and Mathematics 
PATRICK W. BROWNE, A. B., LL. B. 
Professor of Economics and Finance 
Assistant Director of Athletics 
JOSEPH CAVIEZEL, 
XT/^r>™T>xS u £ ent Assistant in Chemistry 
NORBORNE R. CLARK, JR., A. B., A. M. M D 
Attending Physician 
HARRY L. CRANE, S. J., 
Professor of History Public Speaking and Mathematics 
Director of the Publicity Department 
REV DANIEL M. CRONIN, S. J., 
Professor of Mathematics 
REV. JOHN DEIGNAN, S. J., 
Professor of Chemistry 
REV. JAMES E. DePOTTER S T 
Professor of Education, Philosophy and Evidences of Religion 
MICHAEL J. DONAHUE, A B 
Professor ^of Economics and Education 
Director of Athletics 
HUYET W. FITZSIMMONS, 
btudent Assistant in Accounting 



Officers of Instruction 



WILLIAM HARDIE, 
Student Assistant in Elocution 

KERMIT T. HART, B, S. B. A., 
Head of the Department of Commerce 
Professor of Accounting and Finance 

REV. JOHN HUTCHINS, S. J., 
Professor of French 

REV. FRANCIS JANSSEN, S. J., 

Professor of Latin and Greek 

Moderator of Portier Literary Society 

MARIE YVONNE JAUBERT, A. B., M. A., B. L. S. 
Librarian 

WILFRED LEATHERWOOD, 

Student Assistant in Spanish 

*WILLIAM M. MASTIN, M 4 D., L. L. D., 
Consulting Physician 

REV. WM. A. MULHERIN, S. J., 
Professor of Philosophy and Philosophy of Religion 

REV. WILLIAM OBERING, S. J., 
Professor of Ethics, Sociology, Evidences of Religion and Special 

Metaphysics 

REV. PETER P. O'SULLIVAN, S. J., 
Professor of Latin, English and Evidences of Religion 

BRETT R. PATTON, 

Student Assistant in Chemistry 

REV. CHARLES J. QUIRK, S. J., 

Professor of English and Head of the Department 

Director of the Corsair, the Springhillian and the Poetry Club 

REV. THOMAS J. SHIELDS, S. J., 

Professor of English and Philosophy of Religion 

Faculty Director of Athletics 

REV. FRANCIS TADEO, S. J., 
Professor of Spanish 

FRANCIS J. WASHICKEK, A. B., M. A., 
Professor of German 

REV. ANTHONY J. WESTLAND, S. J., 

Professor of Physics 
Director of Seismic Observatory and Physics Club 

REV. PATRICK H. YANCEY, S. J., 

Professor of Biology 

Director of Mendel Club and Spring Hill Lecture Club 

♦Deceased. 



General Statement 



Spring Hill College enjoys the distinction of being 
one of the first institutions of higher learning established 
in the South. It was founded in the year 1830 by the 
Rt. Rev. Michael Portier, D. D., the first Bishop of Mobile. 
In 1836, the Legislature of the State of Alabama incorpo- 
rated it, giving it all the rights and privileges of a 
university, and in the year 1840, the Sovereign Pontiff, 
Gregory XVI, empowered it to grant canonical degrees 
in philosophy and theology. In 1847 the management of 
the College was entrusted to the Society of Jesus, whose 
members have since endeavored to make it a center of 
liberal culture. Spring Hill College was admitted to 
membership in the Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools of the Southern States in 1922. Without inter- 
ruption, the work of the College has continued for more 
than a century. The year 1930 witnessed the celebration 
of its one hundredth anniversary. 

Spring Hill College is picturesquely situated on an 
elevation two hundred feet above the sea level in Mobile's 
most beautiful residential district. The natural beauty of 
its site adorned with an almost endless variety of trees 
and shrubs and flowers, its artificial lake, its shaded ave- 
nues and the striking setting of its athletic fields and of 
its buildings, make the Spring Hill campus one of the 
most attractive college sites in the United States. 

Owing to its altitude and to the invigorating influ- 
ence of its resinous pines upon the surrounding atmos- 
phere, Spring Hill holds one of the best records for health 
in the country. In fact, very eminent physicians, well 
acquainted with our American colleges, have declared it 
pre-eminently desirable for students on account of its 
climatic advantages and perfect hygienic arrangements. 
The records of the United States Weather Bureau of 
Mobile show that for a period of fifty years, there is an 
average of only ninety-five cloudy days a year; and most 



CATALOGUE 



of these were only partly cloudy. Besides, the temper- 
ature is most equable; figures for the school year during 
the last ten years showing that the City of Mobile enjoys 
an average of 62.7 degrees. Outdoor exercise continues 
uninterruptedly from the beginning of the school year to 
the end. 

Spring Hill College at present offers four years of 
undergraduate study, leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Com- 
merce and four year courses in Education leading to 
teacher's certificates. Two-year courses are given in 
Engineering, Pre-Dental, Pre-Legal, and Pre-Medical 
work. In the light of the findings of the Association of 
the American Medical Colleges, the faculty advise stu- 
dents preparing for the study of medicine to take a Pre- 
Medical course of three years. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

Spring Hill College has extensive acreage, which af- 
fords ample room for buildings and athletic fields. The 
group of buildings consists of the Main Building, Mobile 
Hall, Yenni Hall, the Infirmary, the Chapel, the Thomas 
Byrne Memorial Library, and the Recreation Hall. 

THE MAIN BUILDING was erected in 1869, and is 
a substantial brick structure, several hundred feet in 
length and three stories high. The central part is occu- 
pied by the Faculty and the Administrative offices. From 
the third gallery of this building one may get a most 
beautiful view of the surrounding country, with its pine- 
clad hills, and the Bay of Mobile in the distance. 

MOBILE HALL, which was dedicated November 6, 
1927, is a splendid dormitory building, with rooms that 
leave nothing to be desired in the way of utility and com- 
fort. Each one is large and airy, and provided with its 
own clothes press, toilet and hot and cold shower. There 
is also a beautiful lounging room. 



8 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

YENNI HALL, erected and named in memory of 
Rev. Dominic Yenni, S.J., Professor of Latin and Greek 
at Spring Hill for over fifty years, and author of Yenni's 
Latin and Greek Grammar, is entirely devoted to Science. 
Here are installed the Physics, Chemistry and Biology 
lecture rooms and laboratories, and the Seismographic 
Station, which is one of the few in the entire South. 

THE INFIRMARY BUILDING is separated from the 
other buildings, and is equipped to take care of all ordi- 
nary cases of illness. It is supplied with a complete phar- 
macy, and is under the direction of a physician of Mobile, 
who visits the College regularly. 

THE CHAPEL occupies the center of the architec- 
tural group, and is connected with the main building by 
concrete galleries. It is a stately Gothic structure and 
is generally considered the most perfect building of its 
kind in the South. 

THE THOMAS BYRNE MEMORAIL LIBRARY has 
space for 150,000 volumes. A general reading room, 
large enough to accommodate two hundred students. 
Special rooms for quiet research work are provided for in 
this splendid structure. 

THE RECREATION HALL is used as a recreation 
center. 

Spring Hill has several athletic fields, and ample 
space for more. One, in particular, is exceptionally fine. 
It is called Maxon Field, after a former coach of the 
College — a stretch divided in half by a beautiful avenue 
of aged oaks, and surrounded by stately pines. Here the 
intra-mural baseball leagues hold forth, several teams 
being able to play at the same time. A nine-hole golf 
course is maintained, affording an opportunity for those, 
who may be inclined to engage in this fascinating sport. 



CATALOGUE 



CURRICULUM 

The purpose of Spring Hill College is to educate in 
the fullest sense, that is, to develop thoroughly and har- 
moniously the faculties of the whole man — intellectual, 
moral and physical. It assumes that on this harmonious 
development will depend the character of the students 
and the measure of their future utility to themselves and 
to the community ; and it aims to give that solid training 
of both mind and heart, which will make for this develop- 
ment and will fit the student for the just interpretation 
and use of life. 

In the intellectual training of its students, the insti- 
tution aims at laying a solid foundation in the elements 
of knowledge and at opening the mind to a generous 
share in the culture of life. For this reason the studies 
are chosen each for its distinct educational value and as 
a part in a complete and nicely adjusted system. The 
studies are so graded and classified as to be adapted to 
the mental growth of the student and to his orderly ac- 
quisition of knowledge. 

The courses leading to degrees embrace instruction 
in the departments of philosophy, sociology, language, 
literature, history, science and mathematics. The aim 
of these courses is to give the student a complete liberal 
education, which will train and develop all the powers of 
the mind, and will cultivate no one faculty to an exag- 
gerated degree at the expense of the others. The college 
ideal is not to foster specialization, but to cultivate the 
mind, to build thought and reasoning and that breadth of 
view which must ever be the foundation as well of more 
advanced scholarship, as of eminence in the professions 
or other stations of life. 

The two-year courses are designed for those students, 
who are unable to spend four years in a regular Arts or 
Science course. 



10 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

SYSTEM OF EDUCATION 

The officers and teachers in the College are for the 
most part members of the Jesuit order, an organization, 
which from its origin, has devoted itself to the education 
of youth. It conducts high schools, colleges and univer- 
sities throughout the United States, and has more than 
twenty-five thousand students in its various institutions. 

The principles of education, which have made the 
Jesuits successful in educational work throughout the 
world, and which are followed at Spring Hill, as in every 
Jesuit institution, are set forth in the Ratio Studiorum, a 
body of rules and suggestions outlined by the most prom- 
inent Jesuit educators in 1599, revised in 1832, and at- 
tended to up to the present day with unfailing results. 

Truly psychological in its methods, and based upon 
the very nature of man's mental process, it secures on the 
one hand that stability so essential to educational thor- 
oughness, while on the other, it is elastic, and makes lib- 
eral allowances for the widely varying circumstances of 
time and place. While retaining, as far as possible, all 
that is unquestionably valuable in the older learning, it 
adopts and incorporates the best results of modern pro- 
gress. It is a noteworthy fact, however, that many of the 
recently devised methods of teaching, such as the Natu- 
ral, and Inductive and similar methods, are admittedly 
in reality mere revivals of devices recommended long 
ago in the Ratio Studiorum.* 

As understood by the Jesuits, education in its com- 
plete sense, is the full and harmonious development of 
all those faculties that are distinctive of man. It is more 
than mere instruction or the communication of knowl- 
edge. The acquirement of knowledge, though it neces- 
sarily pertains to any recognized system of education, is 



♦Those who are desirous of further information on the subject are referred 
to "Jesuit Education," by Robert Swickerath, S.J. (Herder, St. Louis, 1903), and 
to the numerous documents therein cited. 



CATALOGUE 11 



only a secondary result of Education itself. Learning is 
an instrument of education, which has for its end culture 
and mental and moral development. 

Consonant with this view of the purpose of educa- 
tion, it is clear that only such means be chosen both in 
kind and amount, as will effectively further the purpose 
of education itself. A student cannot be forced, within 
the short period of his school course and with his imma- 
ture faculties, to study a multiplicity of the languages 
and sciences into which the vast world of knowledge has 
been scientifically divided. It is evident, therefore, that 
the purpose of the mental training given is not proximate- 
ly to fit the student for some special employment or 
profession, but to give him such a general, vigorous and 
rounded development, as well enable him to cope success- 
fully even with the unforeseen emergencies of life. While 
affording mental stability, it tends to remove the insular- 
ity of thought and want of mental elasticity, which is 
one of the most hopeless and disheartening results of 
specialization on the part of students, who have not 
brought to their studies the uniform mental training 
given by a systematic college course. These studies, there- 
fore, are so graded and classified as to be adapted to the 
mental growth of the student and to the scientific unfold- 
ing of knowledge. They are so chosen and communicated, 
that the student will gradually and harmoniously reach, 
as nearly as may be, that measure of culture of which he 
is capable. 

It is fundamental in the Jesuit system, that different 
studies have distinct educational values. Mathematics, 
the Natural Sciences, Language and History are comple- 
mentary instruments of education to which the doctrine 
of equivalents cannot be applied. The specific training 
given by one cannot be applied to another. The best 
educators of the present day are beginning to realize 
more fully, than ever before, that prescribed curricula, 



12 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

embracing well chosen and co-ordinate studies, afford 
the student the most efficient means of mental cultiva- 
tion and development. This, however, does not prohibit 
the offering of more than one of such systematic courses, 
as for instance, the Classical and the Scientific, in view 
of the future career of the individual. While recogniz- 
ing the importance of Mathematics and the Natural 
Sciences, which unfold the interdependence and laws of 
the world of time and space, the Jesuit System of edu- 
cation has unwaveringly kept Language in a position of 
honor, as an instrument of culture. Mathematics and 
the Natural Sciences bring the student into contact with 
the material aspects of nature, and exercise the deductive 
and inductive powers of reason. Language and History 
effect a higher union. They are manifestations of spirit 
to spirit, and by their study and their acquirement, the 
whole mind of man is brought into widest and subtlest 
play. The acquisition of Languages especially calls for 
delicacy of judgment and fineness of perception, and for 
a constant, keen and quick use of the reasoning powers. 

Much stress is also laid on Mental and Moral philos- 
ophy, as well for the influence such study has in men- 
tal development, as for its power in steadying the judg- 
ment of the student in his outlook on the world and on 
life. Rational Philosophy, as a means of developing 
young manhood, is an instrument of strength and effec- 
tiveness. 

But to obtain these results, Philosophy must be such 
in reality, as well as in name. It must not content itself 
with vague groping after light, with teaching merely the 
history of Philosophy; detailing the vagaries of the 
human mind without venturing to condemn them; re- 
viewing the contradictory systems, which have held sway 
for a time, without any expression of opinion as to the 
fatal defects which caused them to be discarded. It must 
do more than this. It must present a logical, unified, com- 



CATALOGUE 13 



plete system of mind-culture in accord with the estab- 
lished laws of human thought; it must take its stand on 
some definite propositions expressive of truth; it must 
rise to the dignity of a science. With such a definite 
system to defend against attack, the mind becomes more 
acute and plastic, the logical powers are strengthened, 
the value of a proof is properly estimated, the vulner- 
able points of error are readily detected, and truth comes 
forth triumphant from every conflict of mind with mind. 

Finally, the Jesuit System does not share the delu- 
sion of those who seem to imagine that education under- 
stood, as an enriching and stimulating of the intellectual 
faculties, has of itself a morally elevating influence in 
human life. While conceding the effects of education in 
energizing and refining the student's imagination, taste, 
understanding and powers of observation, it has always 
held that knowledge and intellectual development of 
themselves have no moral efficacy. Religion alone can 
purify the heart and guide and strengthen the will. This 
being the case, the Jesuit System aims at developing side 
by side the moral and intellectual faculties of the stu- 
dent, and sending forth into the world men of sound 
judgment, of acute and rounded intellect, of upright and 
manly conscience. It maintains that, to be effective, 
morality is to be taught continuously ; it must be the un- 
derlying base, the vital force, supporting and animating 
the whole organic structure of education. It must suffuse 
with its light all that is read, illuminating what is noble 
and exposing what is base, giving to the true and false 
their relative light and shade. In a word, the purpose 
of Jesuit teaching is to lay a solid substructure in the 
whole mind and character for any superstructure of 
science, professional and special, as well as for the up- 
building of moral life, civil and religious. 



14 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

MORAL AND RELIGIOUS TRAINING 

In its moral and religious training, the college aims 
at building the conscience of its students for the right ful- 
filment of their civil, social and religious duties. There is 
insistence on the cultivation of the Christian virtues which 
operate for this fulfilment; and, as the only solid basis 
of virtue and morality, thorough instruction in the prin- 
ciples of religion forms an essential part of the system. 
Students of any denomination are admitted to the courses, 
and all are required to show a respectful demeanor dur- 
ing the ordinary exercises of public prayer. The Catholic 
students are required to attend the classes in Evidence of 
Religion, to be present at the chapel exercises, to make 
an annual retreat, and to approach the Sacraments at 
least once a month. 



CATALOGUE 15 



Administration 



SESSIONS 



The school year begins about the middle of Septem- 
ber and ends in the beginning of June. The year is di- 
vided into two semesters or sessions of eighteen weeks 
each. The first semester ends during the last week of 
January. The second begins immediately thereafter, 
without mid-year holidays. 

ATTENDANCE 

Every student is obliged to attend every lecture 
scheduled for his class, and all study periods, and unau- 
thorized absences, even from one class exercise, will de- 
prive him of the privileges of those who are in good 
standing, and lower his monthly mark in the subject 
treated during his absence. Credit for a course will be 
lost if the record for attendance is less than 85 per cent. 
In case of prolonged absence, due to illness or the like, 
this rule may be modified, but in any case all class work 
must be satisfactorily made up. 

Attendance is counted from the day of registration, 
and continues until the last exercise of each semester. 
Hence it is important that parents see that their boys 
report at school on the appointed day and remain until 
school closes at the end of each semester. Leave of ab- 
sence during the term, and permission to leave in advance 
of the appointed day for the Christmas holidays or for 
the summer vacation, should not be asked by parents, 
and will not be granted except for very serious reasons. 

Tardiness in class attendance is regarded as a par- 
tial absence, and three tardy marks will be recorded as 
one absence. 



16 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

DISCIPLINE 

THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM employed by the 
College includes, as one of its most important features, 
the formation of character. For this reason, the disci- 
pline, while considerate, is unflinchingly firm, especially 
when the good of the student body and the reputation of 
the institution are concerned. 

While is is the policy of the faculty to trust as much 
as possible to the honor of the students themselves, in 
carrying on the government of the college, nethertheless, 
for the maintaining of order and discipline, without 
which the desired results are not attainable, regular and 
punctual attendance, obedience to college regulations, 
serious application to study and blameless conduct will 
be insisted upon; and honor, fair-dealing, self-restraint 
and fortitude will be demanded as the natural and nec- 
essary virtues of genuine character. Any serious breach 
of college discipline, repeated violation of regulations, 
neglect of studies, the possession or use of intoxicating 
liquors, and other offenses against morals or discipline 
which, in the judgment of the faculty, reflect on the good 
name of the college, render the offender liable to dis- 
missal. 

The college reserves the right to dismiss at any time 
a student who fails to give satisfactory evidence of ear- 
nestness of purpose and of interest in the serious work of 
college life. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Examinations in all subjects are held at the end of 
each semester. Besides, there are written monthly tests. 
The semester examination, together with the average of 
the months preceding, determine the standing of a pupil 
for the semester. The results of all examinations 
and tests are mailed to parents and guardians. If a pupil, 
on account of sickness or any other cause, misses a month- 



CATALOGUE 17 



ly test or an examination in any subject, he will be re- 
quired to make it up. In such cases, however, the re- 
sponsibility rests with the student, and his record will 
show zero until such test or examination is taken. 

Seventy percent is required for passing in each sub- 
ject. Sixty to sixty-nine constitutes a "condition," less 
than sixty, a "failure." 

Conditions may be incurred by failure to satisfy the 
requirements of any course, which requirements include 
the recitations, tests, and other assigned work, as well 
as the examinations. A condition due, either to failure in 
a monthly test or in a semester examination, may be re- 
moved by a supplementary test or examination. The 
supplementary tests may be taken at the convenience of 
the professor. The supplementary examinations are 
held, upon recommendation of the department concerned 
and with the approval of the dean of the college, during 
the first month of the succeeding semester. They may 
be taken only on the days specified, and may not be de- 
ferred, except with the express consent of the dean. For 
each subject a fee is charged, payable in advance to the 
treasurer of the college. Removal of conditions by ex- 
aminations shall not entitle the student to a grade higher 
than seventy per cent. 

A student may take only one examination to remove 
a condition. If he fails to pass the subject, in both the 
regular and supplementary examination, he must repeat 
the entire subject in class. 

A condition due to failure to complete assigned work 
may be removed by making up the required work. 

TRANSCRIPT OF RECORD 

Students wishing transcript of records in order to 
transfer from this College to another, or for any other 
purpose, should make early and seasonable application 
for the same. No such statements will be made out dur- 



18 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



ing the busy periods of examination and registration, 
September 10 to 25, January 25 to February 5, and June 
1 to 15. One transcript of record is furnished free. One 
dollar is charged for additional copies. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

THE SCHOLASTIC YEAR is divided into two semes- 
ters. The first semester begins about the second week of 
September; the second, in the last week of January. 

REGULAR CHARGES (per semester) 



a. For Boarders 
Basic Fee $300.00 

Includes Tuition, Board, Room, Laundry, Medical, 
Athletic and Library Fees. 

A deposit of fifty dollars ($50.00) is required to 
cover cost of books and stationery, cleaning, pressing and 
mending of clothes and to provide for spending money, 
entertainments and incidentals. 

Resident students will not be allowed to remain at 
the College during the Christmas holidays. 

b. For Day Students 

Tuition $75.00 

Athletic and Library Fees $15.00 

EXPENSES INCURRED BY SOME STUDENTS 

There is a registration fee of ten dollars payable the 
first year only, and a graduation fee of fifteen dollars 
payable the last semester before graduation. For each 
Science there is a laboratory fee of seven and one-half 
dollars per semester; for Accounting a laboratory fee of 
five dollars per semester, and Surveying three dollars. 
For conditional examinations taken on assigned days a fee 



CATALOGUE 19 



of two dollars is charged, payable before the examina- 
tion; for conditional examinations taken on other than 
assigned days, a fee of five dollars is charged. A semester 
condition must be removed within the ensuing month, 
otherwise no credit shall be given in that subject. One 
transcript of a student's record is furnished free. One 
dollar is charged for each additional transcript. 

A tuition fee of one dollar for each semester is 
charged all students not regularly registered in the De- 
partment of Commerce, who take the following courses: 
All courses in Commerce not marked "E". 

There is a charge of fifty dollars per semester for 
those who take music lessons; twenty-five dollars for 
drawing, except when it is part of the student's regular 
course; and twenty dollars each for Stenography and 
Typewriting. 

A fee of five dollars per semester is charged for the 
use of the golf course. 

A deposit of ten dollars must be made before a room 
is considered reserved. This amount will be held as se- 
curity against damage to room or furniture. 

TREASURY REGULATIONS 

All bills are payable in advance at the beginning of 
each semester, namely, in September and February. 

A refund will be allowed only in case of serious 
sickness, necessitating absence from the College for a 
period exceeding a month, and this only for board and 
lodging. Late attendance, dismissal and withdrawal 
being serious inconveniences to the College, contracts are 
made for semesters, and not for shorter periods. 

When parents desire the College to pay for clothing, 
traveling, dentistry, etc., they should either make the ini- 
tial deposit large enough to cover these expenses, or for- 
ward to the Treasurer the amount required for such 
purposes. 



20 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

No advance will be made beyond this deposit. 

Books and stationery are furnished by the College 
at the expense of parents. 

The College will not be responsible for books, cloth- 
ing, jewelry, or any other articles left by any student 
when departing from the College ; much less for the loss 
of books, clothing, jewelry or money while in the keep- 
ing of the owner during the school year. 

No student will be admitted to examination or grant- 
ed a degree until all indebtedness to the College is settled. 



CATALOGUE 21 



Admission 



PREPARATION 

Academic preparation, as secured by the completion 
of four years of a standard high school is essential to a 
student who wishes to enter college. Inquiry into the 
causes of failure in college classes makes it but too appar- 
ent that the chief of these causes is lack of preparation ; 
and many applicants, who have had good school oppor- 
tunities, are found to be particularly deficient in their 
knowledge of preparatory mathematics and in their abil- 
ity to use the English language. A thorough working 
knowledge, therefore, of the preparatory subjects is ab- 
solutely necessary in order to begin and carry on success- 
fully the prescribed work of the college, and it is mani- 
festly unfair to the applicant himself to admit him to 
college unless he has had sufficient preparation. The 
college classes begin where the preparatory work of the 
high school leaves off, and there is no opportunity after 
entering college to make up those deficiencies which a 
student may have incurred in his preparation. 

TESTIMONIALS 

All applicants for admission must present satisfac- 
tory testimonials of good moral character. 

CREDENTIALS 

The college requires for admission the satisfactory 
completion of a four-year course in a secondary school 
approved by a recognized accrediting agency or the 
equivalent of such a course. The major portion of the 
secondary school course, presented by a student for ad- 
mission, should be definitely correlated with the curricu- 
lum to which he seeks admission ; in other words, all can- 
didates for admission to Freshman year must present 
fifteen units in acceptable subjects. A unit represents a 
year's study in any subject, constituting approximately 



22 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

a quarter of a full year's work. This definition of a unit 
takes the four-year high school as a basis and assumes 
that the length of the school year is from thirty-six to 
forty weeks, that a period is from forty-five to sixty min- 
utes in length, and that the study is pursued for four or 
five periods a week. 

No student will be admitted except on presentation 
of an official transcript of credits from the high school 
last attended. Credentials which are accepted for admis- 
sion become the property of the college. 

METHODS OF ADMISSION 

Candidates are admitted either on certificate or by 
examination. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

Admission by certificate is granted applicants from 
all schools on the approved list of the Commission on 
Accredited Schools of the Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools of the Southern States and of other 
recognized accrediting agencies outside the territory em- 
braced by the Southern Association. 

Blank forms of entrance certificates, which are to 
be used in every case, may be had on application to the 
Registrar. Certificates must be made out and signed by 
the Principal or other recognized officer of the school, 
and mailed by him directly to the Registrar. It is ex- 
pected that the Principal will not recommend all grad- 
uates, but only those whose ability, application and schol- 
arship are such that the school is willing to stand sponsor 
for their success in college. 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

Applicants who are not entitled to admission by cer- 
tificate must take examinations in the required entrance 
units. These examinations are held during the week pre- 
ceding the opening of classes. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students applying for admission from standard in- 
stitutions of collegiate rank will be given advanced stand- 
ing provided the credits of the institution are acceptable 



CATALOGUE 23 



and sufficient to be considered equivalent to the work 
done in the corresponding classes at Spring Hill. 

Such candidates should present in advance of regis- 
tration : 

1. A certificate of honorable dismissal from the 
school last attended. 

2. An official transcript of college credits, with 
specifications of courses, year when taken, hours and 
grades. 

3. An official certified statement of college en- 
trance credits, showing the length of each course in 
weeks the number of recitations and laboratory exercises 
each week, the length of recitation periods, and the 
mark earned. 

No student will be admitted to the college as a can- 
didate for a degree after the first semester of the Senior 
year. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Mature and earnest students, who either are lacking 
in the required units or wish to pursue particular studies 
without reference to graduation, may be admitted by the 
permission of the dean to such course of their own choice 
as they seem qualified to take. The work done by these 
students cannot be counted later on toward a degree at 
Spring Hill unless all entrance requirements have been 
satisfied. 

PRESCRIBED UNITS FOR REGULAR COURSES 

FOR THE A. B. COURSE 

English 3 units Greek* or Mod. Lang... 2 units 

Mathematics 3 units History 1 unit 

Latin 4 units Science 1 unit 

FOR THE B. S. COURSE 

English 3 units History 1 unit 

Mathematics 3 units Science 1 unit 

Foreign Language 2 units 

FOR THE B. S. IN COMMERCE COURSE 

English 3 units One foreign language.. 2 units 

Mathematics 2V 2 units Bookkeeping 1 unit 

History 1 unit 

♦Provisions made for those who have not the prescribed units in Greek. 



24 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

The remaining units may be selected from subjects 
counted toward graduation in an accredited or recog- 
nized high school, with the following restrictions: 

1. No subject may be presented for less than a half 
unit of credit. 

2. Not more than one unit, counted towards grad- 
uation by an accredited high school, will be accepted in 
a vocational or commercial subject. 



CATALOGUE 25 



Degrees 



The College confers the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Science in Com- 
merce, following the satisfactory completion of the four- 
year courses enjoined by the Faculty on the candidates 
for these degrees. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

(a) AMOUNT OF WORK 

In order to receive a degree, a student is required to complete 
one hundred and twenty-eight semester hours of work and to main- 
tain a minimum grade of 70. 

The requirements for graduation include: 

1. A certain amount of prescribed work, especially during the 
Freshman and Sophomore years. 

2. A major and minor, to be taken chiefly during the Junior 
and Senior years. 

3. Approved electives, which afford opportunity for broader 
culture or for greater specialization, as the student may choose. 

4. At least the Senior year in residence at Spring Hill College. 

5. A written thesis approved by the dean of the college and 
presented on or before February 1 of the year in which the degree is 
expected to be conferred. 

6. All work in order to be accepted in fulfilment of any re- 
quirement for the degree must be completed with grade 70-80 or 
over. 

7. A fee of fifteen dollars^ payable in advance. 

All applicants for degrees should file their application and pre- 
sent all their credits on or before the first of April. 

The semester hour is the unit or standard for computing the 
amount of a student's work. A semester hour is defined as one lec- 
ture, recitation or class exercise, one hour in length per week, for 
one semester. Two hours of laboratory work are equivalent to one 
recitation hour. Two hours of preparation on the part of the stu- 
dent is required for each hour of lecture or recitation. 

The normal load is sixteen semester hours plus two in religion. 
Where specific combinations require it, work amounting to seventeen 
semester hours plus two religion will be permitted. A load of eight- 
een semester hours plus two in religion is the maximum, and no 



26 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

student who has failed in any course at Spring Hill College will be 
allowed to carry the maximum load. Credit for the courses in "Relig- 
ion or Philosophy of Religioon is obligatory and requisite for gradu- 
ation. 

(b) QUALITY OF WORK 

The average of the monthly written tests counts for one half 
of the semester grade and the semester examination the other half. 

Credits are not given for average grades, but only when every 
test and examination has 70 for a minimum. 

The percentage system is used in giving grades, 70 per cent 
being required for passing. In addition to Quantity credits, which 
are given upon completing the courses with a grade of 70 per cent 
or more, Quality points are allowed according to the quality of work 
done. A grade of 75 to 84 gives the student one Quality credit for 
each Quantity credit; a grade of 85 to 94 gives him two Quality 
credits for each Quantity credit; and a grade of 95 to 100 gives 
him three Quality credits for each Quantity credit. Quality credits 
are computed from the year-grade of the student. 

These grades are not given out to the students by the prof essors f 
but are regularly issued from the office of the dean of the college. 

Candidates for degrees must attend any course of lectures or 
any other exercises, that have been or may be equipped and required 
by the faculty, even though such courses receive no value in credits. 

MAJOR AND MINOR SEQUENCE 

There must be completed a Major Sequence of at least twenty- 
four hours in some subject (or in the discretion of the professor 
concerned and with the approval of the dean, in some closely related 
group of subjects) and a Minor Sequence of at least eighteen hours. 

A major may be changed only by the consent of the Dean and 
the heads of the departments concerned, and such change will be 
permitted only upon the distinct understanding that all the courses 
prescribed in the major finally chosen shall be completed before 
graduation. 

ELECTIVES 

Courses (a) not taken as prescribed courses, and (b) not in- 
cluded in the student's major and minor may be chosen as approved 
electives to complete the 128 credits required for graduation. 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 27 

In the choice of electives, each student must be guided by his 
prospective future work. He must ascertain, moreover that such 
courses are open to his class; that he has fulfilled the prerequisites, 
and that there will be no conflict in the schedule of recitations or 
laboratory periods. 

Students, who offer French or Spanish as an entrance require- 
ment, will not receive credit toward graduation for French I or 
Spanish I, taken in college. 

Two years must be completed in a foreign language before it is 
accepted for a credit toward a degree. 

Electives for the second term must be filed by members of 
the upper classes with the dean on or before January 5, and for the 
first term on or before May 15. 

REFERENCE STUDY AND RESEARCH 

1. Students taking courses in Philosophy shall prepare and 
submit each month a paper of 2,000 words dealing with the devel- 
opment of some specific topic of the subject-matter treated in class. 

2. Students taking courses in Education, History and Social 
Sciences will be required to hand in two papers each semester. 
These papers are to contain not less than 1,800 words; and at least 
one of the four papers thus submitted during the year should give 
unmistakable signs of original research. 

3. All such and other prescribed written assignments will be 
held to strictly as pre-requirements for graduation, for the fulfil- 
ment of which no student will be allowed any extension of time be- 
yond the 5th of May of his Senior year. 



28 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Schedule of A. B. Course 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek or Mod. Lang... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek or Mod. Lang... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek or Mod. Lang... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

History 3 hours 

Introd. to Phil 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek or Mod. Lang... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

History 3 hours 

Introd. to Phil 2 hours 



JUNIOR 



First Semester — 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Approved Electives ..10 hours 



Second Semester — 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Approved Electives ..10 hours 



SENIOR 



First Semester — 

Philosophy 8 hours 

Approved Electives .. 7 hours 



Second Semester — 

Philosophy 8 hours 

Approved Electives .. 7 hours 



CATALOGUE 



29 



Schedule of B. S. Course 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester- 
English 8 houra 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Drawing 2 hours 



Second Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Drawing 2 hours 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester — 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Introd. to Phil 1 hour 

History 3 hours 



Second Semester — 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 5 hours 

Introd. to Phil 2 hours 

History 3 hours 



JUNIOR 



First Semester — 

Science 4 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Approved Electives 9 hours 



Second Semester — 

Science 4 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Approved Electives 9 hours 



SENIOR 



First Semester — 

Science 4 hours 

Philosophy 7 hours 

Approved Electives .... 5 hours 



Second Semester — 

Science 4 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Approved Electives .... 8 hours 



30 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Schedule of 
Engineering Course 



First Semester — 

Mathematics 3 

Language 3 

Chemistry 4 

Drawing 4 

English 3 

Public Speaking 1 

Physical Educatidn ....V 2 

First Semester — 

Mathematics 4 

Physics 4 

Descriptive Geometry 4 

English 3 

Language 3 

Physical Education ....% 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester — 
hours Mathematics, 4 or 8.... 3 hours 

hours Language 3 hours 

hours Chemistry 4 hours 

hours Drawing 2 hours 

I'ffl Descriptive Geometry.. 2 hours 

hours English 3 hours 

hour Public Speaking 1 hour 

hour Physical Education ....Vz hour 

SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester — 

hours Mathematics 5 hours 

hours Physics 4 hours 

hours Drawing 4 hours 

hours English 3 hours 

hours Language 3 hours 

hour Physical Education .... Vz hour 



SCHEDULE OF PRE-LEGAL COURSE 



First Semester — 

Mathematics 3 

Law Latin 3 

Language 3 

Chemistry 4 

English 3 

Public Speaking 1 

First Semester — 

History 3 

Language 3 

Introd. to Phil 1 

Psychology 2 

Sociology 2 

English 3 

Public Speaking 1 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester — 

hours Mathematics 3 

hours Law Latin 3 

hours Language 3 

hours Chemistry 4 

hours English 3 

hour Public Speaking 1 

SOPHOMORE 



hours 

hours 

hour 

hours 

hours 

hours 

hour 



Second 
History ... 
Language 



Semester- 



Introd. to Phil 2 

Special Metaphysics .. 2 

Sociology 2 

English 3 



hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hour 



hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 



CATALOGUE 



31 



Schedule of Pre-Medical Courses 



Two- Year Pre-Medical Course 

FIRST YEAR 



First Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry .. 4 hours 

*Modern Language .... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Sscond Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry .. 4 hours 

*Modern Language .... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



SECOND YEAR 



First Semester — 
Comparative Anatomy 4 hours 
Organic Chemistry .... 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Physics 4 hours 

*Modern Lanugage .... 3 hours 



Sscond Semester — 

Quantitative Chem. .. 4 hours 

Organic Chemistry .... 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Physics 4 hours 

*Modern Lanugage .... 3 hours 



Three- Year Pre-Medical Course 

FIRST and SECOND YEARS same as TWO-YEAR PRE-MEDICAL 

COURSE 

THIRD YEAR 



First Semester — 

Genetics 2 hours 

Physical Chemistry .... 4 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

History 3 hours 

Electives 4 hours 



Second Semester — 
Embryology 4 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

History 3 hours 

Electives 6 hours 



B. S. In Biology 

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology may be obtained 
by completing the requirements for a major in this subject and the 
additional hours to make up the necessary 128. The following 
courses will be offered for this purpose. 

♦Only French or German will be accepted for the B. S. in 
Biology. 






32 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Semester — 

Histology 4 hours 

Philosophy 6 hours 

Sociology 2 hours 



Second Semester — 
Introd. to General 

Physiology 4 hours 

Philosophy 6 hours 

Sociology 2 hours 



Schedule of 
Pre-Dental Course 



First Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry .. 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mod. Language 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry .. 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mod. Language 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Dental Schools accept High School Physics for credit. In this 
case a modern language may usefully be substituted for it in college. 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 33 

Remarks on Regular Courses 



The A.B. Course. 

This course is unexcelled as a preparation for a profession and 
for general culture. By a proper choice of electives, a student 
may include in his schedule Pre-Legal, Pre-Medical or Engineering 
studies, and thus be able to obtain his A. B. Degree with all the 
requirements for entrance into a professional school in four years. 

The B.S. Course. 

The object of this course is to prepare students for a career 
in some technical profession. Those who finish this course are 
entitled to advanced standing in the university courses, and thus 
they are enabled to obtain their B.S. Degree and make their pro- 
fessional studies in the least possible time. Students in this course 
may cover all the Pre-Medical or Pre-Legal requirements. In the 
B. S. course more time is devoted to Sciences, and Modern Lan- 
guages take the place of the Classics. 

The B.S. In Commerce Course. 

This course is designed to meet the demands of those who 
wish to combine a cultural education with the technical courses 
required for a business career. It embraces such subjects as Ac- 
counting, Commercial Law, Economics, Banking, Marketing, Pro- 
duction, Finance, English, Mathematics, and Modern Language, 
but also affords an opportunity for courses in History and Schol- 
astic Philosophy. 

A two-year course in business subjects will be arranged for 
those who do not wish to take the four-year course. 

The Engineering Course. 

This course is practically the same as the first two years of 
the B.S. course. It embraces the subjects that are generally 
required as the foundation of all technical engineering courses. 

The Pre-Legal Course. 

The best preparation for entering upon the study of law is 
a four-year course leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 01 
Bachelor of Science. However, those wishing to take a two-year 
course, which will afterward be counted toward a degree, should 
communicate with the institution at which they intend to make 
their law studies to find out what it advises as a Pre-Legal course. 
In general, any two years of a standard course leading to degrees 
answer the purpose of a Pre-Legal course. 



34 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

The Pre-Medical Course. 

Due to the large number of applicants for medical education in 
recent years and to the continual raising of the standards by med- 
ical schools throughout the country, pre-medical students are strongly 
urged to take the full four years of college work in preparation for 
the study of medicine. With this in view a four-year course, leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Biology, has been worked 
out and is recommended for those who intend to study medicine. 
For those, who cannot spend this much time in undergraduate work, 
the first three years of the above course is admirably adapted to 
prepare them for a medical school. Finally, for those who are satis- 
fied to meet only the minimum requirements of some medical schools, 
the first two years of the same course is obligatory. 

With respect to this course the following excerpt from the 
annual report on "Medical Education in the United States" pre- 
pared by the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals (Jour. 
Amer. Med. Ass'n., Vol. 97 (9), p. 611, Aug. 29, 1931) will make 
plain what the minimum requirements for admission to the accept- 
able medical schools are. 

"II. Pre-medical College Course. The minimum requirement 
for admission to acceptable medical schools, in addition to the high 
school work specified above ( a four-year course of at least fifteen 
units in a standard accredited high school or other institution of 
standard secondary school grade), will be sixty semester hours of 
collegiate work, exclusive of military and physical education, extend- 
ing through two years, of thirty-two weeks each, exclusive of holidays, 
in a college approved by the Council of Medical Education and Hos- 
pitals*. The subjects included in the two years of college work, 
should be in accordance with the following schedule. 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS OF THE TWO-YEAR PRE-MEDICAL 
COLLEGE COURSE 

Required Subjects: Semester Hours 

Chemistry (a) 12 

Physics (b) 8 

Biology (c) 8 

English Composition and Literature (d) 6 

Other Non-Science Subjects (e) 12 

Subjects Strongly Urged: 

A Modern Foreign Language (f) 6-12 

Advanced Botany or Advanced Zoology 3-6 

Psychology and Logic : 3-6 

* Spring Hill College is so approved. Cf. J. A. M. A., 97, p. 612. 



CATALOGUE 35 



The usual introductory college course of six semester hours, 
or its equivalent, is required. 

Suggestions Regarding Individual Subjects: 

Advanced Mathematics, including Algebra and Trigonometry 3-6 

Additional Courses in Chemistry 3-6 

Other Suggested Electives: 
English| (additional), Economics, History, Sociology, Political 

Science, Mathematics, Latin, Greek, Drawing. 

(a) Chemistry. 

Twelve semester hours required of which at least eight semes- 
ter hours must be in General Inorganic Chemistry, including four 
semester hours of laboratory work, and four semester hours in 
Organic Chemistry, including two semester hours of laboratory 
work. In the interpretation of this rule, work in qualitative analysis 
may be counted as General Inorganic Chemistry. 

(b) Physics. 

Eight semester hours required, of which at least two must be 
in laboratory work. It is urged that this course be preceded by a 
course in Trigonometry. 

(c) Biology. 

Eight semester hours required, of which four must consist of 
laboratory work. This requirement may be satisfied by a course of 
four semester hours each in Zoology and Botany, but not by Botany 
alone. 

(d) English Composition and Literature. 

(e) Non-Science Subjects. 

Of the sixty semester hours required as the measurement of 
two years of college work, at least eighteen, including the six semes- 
ter hours of English, should be in subjects other than the Physical, 
Chemical or Biological Sciences. 

(f) Foreign Language*. 

A reading knowledge of a modern foreign language is strongly 
urged. If the reading knowledge of this language is obtained on the 
basis of high school work, the student is urged to take another lan- 
guage in his college course. It is not considered advisable, however, 
to spend more than twelve of the required sixty semester hours on 
foreign languages. 

(g) In General. 

This Pre-Medical Course in both quantity and quality must be 
such as to make it acceptable as the equivalent of the first two 
years of the course in reputable, approved colleges of arts and 
science leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science." 

*Most medical schools specify French or German as the mod- 
ern foreign language required. 



36 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SICENCES 



SUBJECTS IN COURSE 

The Faculty reserves the right to refuse to offer a 
course listed below for which there is not a sufficient 
number of applicants. 

ASTRONOMY 

401. Descriptive Astronomy. 

Fundamental astronomical facts and principal astronomical co- 
ordinates, the celestial sphere. Astronomical instruments. The sun, 
moon and eclipses. The planets, comets, meteors. Constellations, 
clusters and nebulae. Three hours credit. 

402. Spherical and Practical Astronomy. 

The theory and use of astronomical instruments, such as the 
sextant, transit, altazimuth, equatorial, position micrometer, spec- 
troscope, etc. Computation of eclipses, construction of eclipse 
maps. Introduction to celestial machines. Orbits of planets and 
satellites. Three hours credit. 

BIOLOGY 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. General Biology. 

An introductory course consisting of an outline of the physical 
structure and chemical composition of protoplasm and the cell, 
the morphology and physiology of plant and invertebrate animal 
types. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

Given every year. 

201. Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. 

A comparative study of type forms with special reference to 
Analogy and Homology. Prerequisite Biology 101-102. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
One semester. Four hours credit. 

Given in 1931- , 32; to be given in 1933-'34. 

202. Genetics. 

A survey course of the facts and theories of heredity and vari- 
ation. Prerequisite Biology 101-102. 
Lectures two hours per week. 

One semester. Two hours credit. 

Given in 1932; to be given in 1933- , 34. 



CATALOGUE 37 



Given in 1932; to be given in 1934. 

203. Vertebrate Embryology. 

A study of Gametogenesis, Fertilization, Cleavage, Gastrula- 
tion and Later Development of Typical Vertebrate Forms. 
Prerequisite Biology 101-102. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
One semester. Four hours credit. 

Given in 1932-'33; to be given in 1934. 

204. Microscopic Technique. 

A laboratory course in the Methods of Preparing Tissues for 
Microscopical Study. Restricted to a few select students. Pre- 
requisite Biology 101-102, 202 or 203 and Chemistry 101-102. 

Four hours per week. Two hours credit. 

Given in 1932; to be given in 1933- , 34. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

These courses are intended primarily for students majoring in 
Biology and are open for credit ordinarily only to Juniors and 
Seniors. 

301. Histology. 

A study of cells and fundamental tissues. Prerequisites 
Biology 101-102, 202 or 203. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
One semester. Four hours credit. 

Given in 1933; to be given in 1935. 

302. Bacteriology. 

A course dealing with the morphology,, classification, physi- 
ology and cultivation of bacteria; the relation of bacteria to the 
health of man and animals; and the principles of immunity. Pre- 
requisites Biology 101-102 and Chemistry 101-102. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

401. Introduction To General Physiology. 

A study of matter and energy in relation to living things; solu- 
tions; diffusion and osmotic pressure; the physico-chemical struc- 
ture of protoplasm. Prerequisites Biology 101-102,201, 203; Chem- 
istry 101-2, 202, 301. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

To be given in 1933-'34. 



38 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

402. General Physiology. 

The fundamental life processes of organisms from a general 
and comparative viewpoint. Prerequisites Biology 401 and Chem- 
istry 203-4, 301, 305-6. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

To be given in 1934. 

403. History of Biology. 

A review of the principal figures, theories and discoveries which 
have contributed to the development of the science of biology. 
Prerequisite Biology 101-102. 

Lecture one hour per week. 

One semester. One hour credit. 

404. Introduction To Research. 

Special work for advanced students and preparation of thesis. 

Credit to be arranged. 

Mendel Club. 

This club is composed of the staff and students majoring in 
Biology, as well as others interested in the subject. The work of 
the club consists in the reading and discussion of papers on biological 
subjects by the members and invited lecturers. 

One hour per alternate week. 

Two semesters. 



CHEMISTRY 

101. General Inorganic Chemistry. 

This course is intended to familiarize the student with the fun- 
damental principles of chemical theory. The principles are devel- 
oped and driven home by illustrations, exercises and problems. 
Since the chemistry of the laboratory is the true chemistry, the 
whole course is arranged about it and is made to carry the thread 
of the subject. Four hours credit. 

102. Elementary Qualitative Analysis. 

In this course an endeavor is made to impress upon the student 
the principles involved, and to enable him to classify chemical phe- 
nomena, avoiding mere thoughtless manipulation. Special emphasis 
is laid on the development of the ionic theory and theories of 
solution. Four hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 3i> 



202. Quantitative Analysis. 

This course includes the elements of gravimetric and volumetric 
analysis with typical analytical methods. The laboratory work is 
supplemented by conferences and quizzes, the important principles 
of stoichiometry being especially emphasized. Four hours credit. 

203-4. Organic Chemistry. 

The principles of Organic Chemistry and its relation to Gen- 
eral Chemistry are emphasized. Typical organic compounds are 
studied, and their constitution is discussed at some length. General 
reactions and characteristics are discussed, and many applications 
of Organic Chemistry to practical life are given. 

Eight hours credit. 

301. — Physical Chemistry. 

This course is intended to familiarize intending students of 
Medicine and Engineering with the fundamental principles of Chemical 
Theory. The structure of matter, thermodynamics and electrochem- 
istry, are treated as fully as possible. Laboratory work includes the 
different methods of molecular weight determination, electrical con- 
ductance and the determination of Hydrogen-ion concentration, 
colorimetrically and electrometrically. 

Four hours credit. 

302. Materials of Engineering Products. 

A brief course in the elements of qualitative analysis stressing 
analytical actions, separations and identifications in the light of 
modern theories of ionic solutions and equilibria. Analysis of iron, 
steel, certain alloys and commercial products are made with special 
determination of iron, lead, zinc and copper ores. 

Four hours credit. 

303-4. Material of Engineering Products. 

A brief course in the elements of quantitative analysis stressing 
gravimetric determinations of iron, sulphur and chlorine to enable 
the student to acquire speed, accuracy and confidence. Volumetric 
analysis is then taken up with emphasis being placed on commercial 
products and practical methods as determined in a modern industrial 
laboratory. Eight hours credit. 

305-6. — Physiological Chemistry. 

An elementary course dealing with the Chemistry of the Carbo- 
hydrates, fats and proteins. The chemical basis underlying the phe- 
nomena of metabolism; enzymes, absorption and digestion are dis- 
cussed. 

Eight hours credit. 



40 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

N.B. Chemistry 101, 102, 301, 202 are required of Engineering 
students. 

Chemistry 201, 302, 303 and 304 are recommended for Engi- 
neering students. 

Chemistry 101, 102, 203 and 204 are required of Pre-Medi- 
cal students. 

Chemistry 301 and 202 are recommended for Pre-Medical 
students and required by many medical schools. 

DRAWING 

101-2. Mechanical Drawing. 

Lettering, tracing, blue-printing, geometrical construction, 
orthographic and oblique projection, exercises in drawing to scale, 
intersections and development of surfaces. Working drawings of 
machine parts and of complete machines and structures, dimension- 
ing, line-shading. One Semester and a half. Six hours credit. 

106-201. — Descriptive Geometry. 

A critical study of the science of drawing. The location of 
points, lines, planes; single-curved surfaces; surfaces of revolution 
and warped surfaces, with their relations to each other; tangent lines 
and planes; intersection of surfaces; shades and shadows. One se- 
mester and a half. Prerequisite, Solid Geometry. Six hours credit. 
205. Topographical Drawing. 
Shades and shadows, representation of surface forms by contours 
and by shading with pencil, pen and colors. Topographical symbols, 
copying, enlarging and reducing maps. Two hours credit. 

202. Machine Drawing. 

Free-hand and mechanical drawing of machine parts and com- 
plete machines, piping plans, etc., with problems in mechanism and 
in machine design. Four hours credit. 

103-4. Anatomical Drawing. 

An elective course for pre-medical students, calculated to im- 
print graphically upon the mind an accurate theoretical knowledge 
of the construction of the human body. The skeleton, nervous sys- 
tem and various organs form the basis of study. 

Four hours credit. 

204. Architectural Drawing. 

An elective course for those students anticipating the study of 
architecture to be taken the second Semester of the Sophomore 
year. 

The fundamental principles underlying architectural construe- 



CATALOGUE 41 



tion with special stress being laid upon orthographic details of 
moldings, balustrades, facades, doors, windows and domes. 

Three hours lecture per week. 

204-A. Architectural Drawing. 

A laboratory course for those students taking Drawing 204. 
Practical application of principles studied entailing the reproduction 
of the outstanding examples of ancient and modern architectural de- 
tails. Eight hours laboratory per week. 

301. Architectural Design. 

A study of architectural models stressing the method of ren- 
dering and sketching in pencil and charcoal. 

Two hours lecture per week. 
301 -A. Architectural Design. 

Laboratory course in connection with Drawing 301. 

Six hours laboratory per week. 

302. Architectural Design. 

Study of the architecture of the Renaissance of Italy, France 
and England and early American architecture. 

Three hours lecture per week. 
302-A. Architecture Design. 
Laboratory course in connection with Drawing 302. 

ECONOMICS 

Courses as outlined under Department of Commerce. 

EDUCATION 

Courses as outlined under department of Education. 

ENGLISH 

1. Rhetoric and Composition. 

A course in the essentials of rhetoric and in the various modes 
of composition. Required of Freshman students who are deficient 
in the theory or practice of correct English. 

101. Advanced Rhetoric. 

A course in the theory of rhetoric and the study of style based 
on reading, analysis and discussion of works of English prose au- 
thors. Insistence on the principles of literature and frequent prac- 
tice in composition. Required of Freshmen. 

Three hours credit. 

102. Poetry. 

A course in the study of the nature and elements of poetry, 
principles of versification, its various kinds, etc. Reading, analysis 
and appreciation of the chief poets, partly in class study, partly in 
assignments. Frequent practice in composition. Required of Fresh- 
men. Three hours credit. 



42 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

201. Oratory. 

The theory of oratory; analysis and study of oratorical mas- 
terpieces. The preparation of briefs, the composition and delivery 
of short addresses, speeches for occasions, debates, and at least two 
formal orations will be required. Required of Sophomore. 

Three hours credit. 

202. The Drama. 

The theory of the drama will be studied by means of lectures 
and assignments in its history and development; reading, analysis 
and study of works of principal English dramatists, especially 
Shakespeare; composition in dialogue, dramatic sketches, playlets, 
and at least one complete drama will be required. Required of 
Sophomore. Three hours credit. 

301. The English Novel. 

The principal purpose of this course is to study the technique 
of the novel and the various schools of fiction and their tendencies 
with special attention to their ethical and literary value. Reading 
and discussion of noted novels. Three hours credit. 

302. Shakespeare. 

Shakespeare's life, influence, sources of his drama; an acquain- 
tance by reading and assignments with the Shakespearean literature 
of criticism; reading, analysis and study of Shakespeare's plays, 
especially in comparison with those of other dramatists. 

Three hours credit. 

303. Aesthetics and Literary Criticism. 

The philosophical basis of aesthetics, the elements of taste; the 
theory of criticism; a survey of critical standards; a study of the 
schools of criticism and of the work of the chief literary critics. 
Critical papers of assigned subjects will be required. 

Three hours credit. 

304. The Essay. 

The nature of the essay; the artistic and didactic types, and 
their various forms; the characteristics of each. An historical sur- 
vey of the essay with a brief study of the work of the chief essay- 
ists. Newman will receive special attention. Composition in the 
various forms of the essay will be required. 

Three hours credit. 

307. American Literature. From the beginning to 1800. This 
course includes a survey of the Colonial Time and the Revolution- 



CATALOGUE 43 



ary Period. Attention will be specially given to the more important 
authors and their work, such as the Mathers, Jonathan Edwards, The 
Hartford Wits, Philip Freneau, and Charles Brockden Brown. Based 
on Cairn's History of American Literature. 

Three hours credit. 

308. American Literature. From 1800 to the death of Walt 
Whitman. A course intended to give the student a clear grasp of 
this most interesting and important era in our national literature. 
Writers and their work discussed will include the following: Wash- 
ington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper, William Cullen Bryant, the 
Anthology Club, and the Transcendentalists. Based on Cairn's His- 
tory of American Literature. 

Three hours credit. 

309. English Literature. From Beowulf to 1500. A series of 
lectures on Old English and Middle English Literature. Among the 
authors studied will be such as Caedmon, Bede, Alfred the Great, 
Aelfric and Chaucer. Attention will be also directed to a study of 
the early ballads and lyrics. Based on James McCallum's The Be- 
ginnings to 1500. (Scribner's English Literature Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

310. English Literature. The Renaissance. The student will 
have an opportunity in this course to study such great writers as Sir 
Thomas Wyatt, Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, Sir Philip Sidney 
and Edmund Spencer. In this course the plays of Marlowe and 
Shakespeare will be especially stressed. Based on Robert Whitney 
Bolwell's, the Renaissance. (Scribners English Literature Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

311. English Literature. The Seventeenth Century. This 
course will include a careful survey of the Puritan Age and that of the 
Restoration. Milton's Paradise Lost and Dryden's Hind and the 
Panther will be carefully studied and discussed. Based on Evert 
Mordecai Clark's The Seventh Century. (Scribner's English Litera- 
ture Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

312. English Literature. The Eighteenth Century. In this 
course lectures will be given on Daniel Defoe, Addison and Steel, 
Alexander Pope and his circle, with a thorough study of the social 
and religious backgrounds of the period. Based on Joseph P. Blick- 
ensderfer's the Eighteenth Century. (Scribner's English Literature 
Series.) 

Three hours credit. 
401-2. Journalism. 

Ethics of journalism; a brief survey of the history of journal- 
ism, its development, and a discussion of its present tendencies. The 



44 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

technology of the pressroom, news gathering and reporting; prepara- 
tion of copy; copy-reading, proof-reading, interviewing and editing. 
Field work will be required and co-operation with the college period- 
icals. Six hours credit. 

EVIDENCES OF RELIGION 

101. Christian Revelation; the Church. 

102. The Church; God and Salvation. 

Marks and Teaching Office of the Church; Holy Scripture and 
Tradition; the rule of Faith. God the Author and Restorer of our 
salvation; God considered in Himself; One in Nature; His Existence* 
Nature, Attributes, Unity; the Trinity. Two hours credit. 

201. Creation and Redemption. 

Creation; the spiritual world; the material world. Man and the 
Fall. God the Redeemer; the Person and Nature of the Redeemer; 
the work of Redemption. Two hours credit. 

202. Grace and the Sacraments. 

Actual, habitual and sanctifying grace; infused and acquired 
virtues; Pelagianism, Jansenism, Naturalism, and other errors re- 
futed. The Sacraments in general; Baptism; Confirmation; the Holy 
Eucharist as a Sacrament and as a Sacrifice. 

Two hours credit. 

301. The Sacraments; Morality and Virtue; Eschatology. 

302. Divine Worship; Christian Perfection. 

Internal and external worship due to God; direct and indirect 
acts of worship; veneration of the Saints. The Christian's duties 
toward self and neighbor; works of supererogation. 

Two hours credit. 

401. Sacred Scripture. 

Biblical canonics and Hermeneutics. Facts, nature and extent 
of inspiration. The Bible and Science. Explanation of difficulties 
drawn from geology, astronomy, biology, paleontology and evolution. 

Two hours credit. 

402. Scripture Reading; Ecclesiastical History. 

Readings from the Old and New Testaments. Study of princi- 
pal epochs in the history of the Church. Discussion of historical dif- 
ficulties and difficulties drawn from misconception of Catholic doc- 
trine. Two hours credit. 

FRENCH 

101. Elementary French. The rudiments of grammar, includ- 
ing the inflection of the regular and more common irregular verbs; 



CATALOGUE 45 



the order of words in the sentence; colloquial exercises; easy themes; 
conversation. 

First semester. Three hours credit. 

102. Elementary French (Continued.) Mastery of irrigular 
verb forms; use of the conditional and subjuctive; syntax; colloquial 
exercises; themes; conversation ;reading of gratuated texts. 

Three hours credit. 

Text: "Les Prisoniers Du Caucase" by Xavier de Maistre. 

201. Intermediate French. Grammar review, with special at- 
tention to problems in syntax; reading of graduated texts; conversa- 
tion; prose composition; letter writing; dictation, essays. Prerequi- 
site, French 1 and 2 or equivalents. Three hours credit. 

Text: Chateaubriand's "Le Derier Abencerage," de Maistre's 
"La Jeune Siberlienne"; Halevy's "L'Abbe Constantin". 

202. Intermediate French (Continued). Reading of graduated 
texts; conversation; prose composition; letter writing; dictation; 
detailed written abseracts of texts read; essays. 

Three hours credit. 
Texts: Merimee's "Carmen"; Lamartine's "Scenes de la Revo- 
lution Francaise;" Loti's "Pechur d'Islande;" Danemarie "Le Secret 
De L'Etang Noir." 

301. Advanced French. Grammar review with special atten- 
tion to problems in syntax ; reading of graduated texts ; conversation ; 
letter-writing; dictation; grammar and composition based on a French 
text; abstracts of texts read; essays. 

Three hours credit. 
Text: Moliere's "Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, ,, Corneille's "Le 
Cid," Chateaubriand's "Atala," Loit's "Ramuntcho;" Merimee's 
"Colomba." 

302. Advanced French (Continued). Reading of graduated 
texts; conversation; letter writing; dictation; grammar and compo- 
sition based on a French text; abstracts of texts read; essays com- 
posed in French. Three hours credit. 

Text: Racine's "Esther;" A. de Musset's "Carmosine" and other 
dramas. Bazin's "Les Oberle;" Bordeaux's "La Peur de Vivre;" 
La Brette's "Aimer Quard Meme." 

402. Modern French Prose. The study of novels or short stories 
by modern French prose writers: Chateaubriand, Merimee, Loti, 
Bazin, Bordeaux and others. Grammar and composition based on a 
French text. Three hours credit. 

402. The French Drama. The reading of dramas chosen from 
such authors as Corneille, Moliere, Racine, together with a study 
of their lives and works. Three hours credit. 



46 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

GERMAN 

101. Elementary German. 

This course is intended for students who have not presented 
German for admission. Grammar, pronounciation, colloquial exer- 
cises, German prose composition, easy themes, translation from prose 
selections, Word formation, simple conversational exercises in Ger- 
man. Reading aloud and hearing the language read. Memorizing 
German proverbs and poetry. Dictation, written in German script. 

Three hours credit. 

102. Elementary German (Continued.) 

Weak and strong verbs, the use of the modal auxilaries; the 
chief rules of syntax and word-order; selections in prose and verse; 
dictation based upon the readings; frequent short themes; conversa- 
tion; memorizing of poems. Letter writing. Readings: Baumbach, 
Der Schwiegersohn; Storm, Immense; Wildenbruch, Das Edle Blut; 
Wilhelmine von Hillern, Hoher als die Kirche. 

Three hours credit. 

201. Intermedite German. 

Rapid review of grammar; conversation; dictation; prose composi- 
tion. Study of representative German literary masterpieces. Read- 
ing of typical short-stories, portraying modern German life and 
ideals. Open to students who have credit for German 101 and 102, 
or who have presented elementary German for admission. 

Three hours credit. 

202. Intermediate German (Continued.) 

General survey of German literature from its beginning to the 
present time. The more difficult problems of syntax; special prob- 
lems of grammar. Reading of selected texts. Dictation and themes 
based upon the reading. Memorizing of poems. Readings: Schiller, 
William Tell; Goethe, Hermann and Dorothea and Iphigenea; Uh- 
land's Poems. Three hours credit. 

301. German Prose Writers. 

History of German literature, assigned readings and reports. 
The study of novels or short stories by German prose writers; Frey- 
tag, Hauff, Herbert, Stifter, Novalis, Bretano, Eichendorff. 

Three hours credit. 

302. German Poetry. 

Readings from German ballads and lyrics, Selections committed 
to memory. Three hours credit. 

401-2. The German Epic. 

Dreizehnlinden, Weber; Der Trumpeter von Sakkingen, Scheffel; 
selections from other epic poems. Six hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 47 



GREEK 
1. For Beginners. 

Grammar and Composition. Xenophon, Anabasis, I. Required 
of those who do not offer Greek for entrance. 

Three hours a week for one semester. 
2. Xenophon. 

Anabasis, II-III; New Testament, St. Luke's Gospel; Grammar 
and Composition. Required of those who do not offer Greek for 
entrance. Three hours a week for one semester. 

101. Homer. 

The Iliad, I-IV, selections; or Odyssey, selections. Euripides, 
Iphigenia in Aulis, Medea, Hecuba; Aristophanes, Clouds. Sight 
reading; Xenophon, Cyropaedia. Grammar and composition based 
on Arnold. Three hours credit. 

102. Homer. 

The Odyssey, selections; Theocritus, selections; Pindar, Olym- 
pic Odes, selected; sight reading, New Testament, selections. Gram- 
mar review and composition based on Arnold. 

Three hours credit. 

201. Demosthenes. 

On the Crown; selections from St. John Chrysostom and St. 
Basil; studies and oratorical analysis. Grammar review and com- 
position based on Arnold. Three hours credit. 

202. Demosthenes. Aeschylus. 

Demosthenes, Philippics or Olynthiacs; oratorical analysis; 
Aeschylus ? Agammemnon. Grammar review and composition based 
on Arnold. Three hours credit. 

301. Plato. 

Crito, Phaedo. Apology. Three hours credit. 

302. Herodotus, Thucydides. 

Herodotus, selections from Books I-IV.; Thucydides, selections 
from the Sicilian expedition. Three hours credit. 

401. Sophocles. 

Antigone, Oedipus Tyrannus, Oedipus Coloneus. 

Three hours credit. 

402. Aristophanes. 

The Wasps, the Birds, the Frogs. Three hours credit. 

HISTORY 

101. Early Medieval History. 

Migration of Nations. The Islam, the Franks, the Lombards, 
and the Holy See. Church and State. The Carolingians. The 
Northmen in Europe. The Making of Germany and the Rise of the 
Empire. Lay-Investiture. Three hours credit. 



48 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

102. The Middle Ages. 

The Crusaders. The Hohenstaufens. Invasion of the Mongols. 
Saint Louis. Life in the Middle Ages. Feudalism. England and 
France in the Middle Ages. The Exile of the Papacy. The Western 
Schism. The Hundred Years' War. The War of the Roses. Con- 
solidation of European Monarchies. Three hours credit. 

201. Renaissance and Revolution. 

The Revival of Learning, of Art and Politics. Social Condi- 
tions. The Protestant Revolution in Germany, England and Scot- 
land. Catholic Revival. The Huguenot Wars in France. The Revolt 
of the Netherlands. The Thirty Years' War. The Puritan Revolu- 
tion. The Age of Louis XIV. The War of the Spanish Succession. 
The Church and the State. The Making of Russia. The Rise of Prus- 
sia. The Downfall of Poland. The French Revolution. Napoleon Bon- 
aparte. Three hours credit. 

202. Europe Since 1814. 

The Industrial Revolution. England and France in the Nine- 
teenth Century. The Unification of Germany. The Unification of 
Italy. The Social, Political and Religious Conditions in Europe. 
The Eastern Question. The Partition of Africa. The World War 
of 1914. Reconstruction after World War. 

Three hours credit. 

301. American History to the Reconstruction Period. 

This course, with the following ? aims to bring into relief the 
outstanding influences that have shaped the history of the United 
States from the Colonial Period to our own, stressing for this pur- 
pose topics of import for the social, economic and political develop- 
ment of the nation. Junior and Senior year. First semester. 

Three hours credit. 

302. American History Since the Reconstruction Period. 

A similar course to the preceding, stressing in its latest phases 
the conditions and circumstances that led to America's participation 
in the Great War, with the resulting stimulus to a clearer national 
consciousness of the value and significance of American citizen- 
ship. 

LATIN 

1-2. Elementary Latin. 

General grammar with oral and written exercises. Caesar, De 
Bello Gallico I-IV. 
3. Cicero. 
In Catilinam I-III; Letters. Grammar and Composition. 



CATALOGUE 49 



4. Virgil. 

Aeneid I- VI; Ovid, Metamorphoses XIII-XIV. Grammar and 
Composition. 

(Courses 1, 2, 3 and 4 are required of those students who do 
not offer sufficient Latin credits at entrance. These courses do not 
fulfil the requirement of College Latin.) 

101-2. Virgil, Horace, Cicero. 
Virgil, Aeneid V-XII, selections Georgics. Hoiace, De Arte 
Poetica. Cicero, Pro Archia Poeta, Pro Ligario, De Amicitia, De 
Senectute, Soimnium Scipionis. Grammar reviewed and frequent 
composition based on Arnold. 

201-2. ,Horace, Cicero. 

Horace, selected Odes and Epodes. Cicero, Pro Marcello. 
Rhetorical analysis. Grammar reviewed and frequent compositions 
based on Arnold. Required of Sophomore. 

301. Horace, Virgil, Juvenal. 

Horace, selected Satires. Study of Roman Satire. 

Three hours credit. 

302. Cicero, Quintilian. 

Cicero, De Claris Oratoribus, De Orator e. Quintilian, Training 
of the Orator. Study of Roman Oratory. Three hours credit. 

401. Plautus, Terence. 

Selected plays. Three hours credit. 

402. Pliny, Seneca. 

Pliny, selected letters of Pliny the Younger. Seneca, Moral 
Essays, selected letters. Three hours credit. 

403. Ecclesiastical Latin. 

Hymns and homilies selected. One hour credit. 

MATHEMATICS 

1. Advanced Algebra. 

A course for those who present but one unit of Algebra for 
entrance to college. The work starts with a review of Elementary 
Algebra, and then takes up such subjects as are usually given in a 
third semester high school course of Algebra. 

2. Geometry. 

A course for those who have not had Solid Geometry in high 
phasis on geometrical interpretations and applications to geometry, 
school. Cannot be counted in fulfilment of the requirements in 
Mathematics. 

101. College Algebra. 

After a brief review of the foundations, the following topics are 
treated: variables and limits, binomial theorem, series, logarithms. 



50 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

determinants, and theories of equation. PREREQUISITES: Algebra, 
one and one-half units; and Plane Geometry. 

Three hours credit. 

102. Plane Trigonometry. 

The six elementary functions for acute angles; goniometry; 
solution of right and oblique triangles; graphs of the functions and 
solution of simple trigonometric equation. Three hours credit. 

103. Spherical Trigonometry. 

The right spherical triangle. Napier's rules, formulas and 
methods for the solution of the general triangle. Open to students 
who have had Mathematics 102. Two hours credit. 

104. Surveying. 

The theory, use and adjustment of instruments, methods of 
computation and arrangement of data; practical field work and 
topographic map-making. Three hours credit. 

105-6 — Business Mathematics. Percentage; simple and com- 
pound interest; bank, trade and cash discounts; equation of accounts; 
mathematics of sinking funds, bond values, and asset valuation. 

Six hours credit. 

201. Plane Analytic Geometry. 

Loci and their equations. The straight line; the circle; the 
parabola, ellipse, and hyperbola; transformation of co-ordinates; 
polar co-ordinates. Four hours credit. 

202. Solid Analytic Geometry. 

An introductory treatment of the point, plane, straight line, 
and surfaces of revolution. Three hour3 credit. 

204. Differential Calculus. 

Fundamental notions of variables; functions, limits, deriva- 
tives and differentials; differentiation of the ordinary algebraic, ex- 
ponential and trigonometric functions with geometric applications to 
minims, inflexions and envelopes; Taylor's formula. 

Five hours credit. 

301. Integral Calculus. 

The nature of integration; elementary processes and integrals; 
geometric applications to area, length, volume and surface; multiple 
integrals; use of infinite series in integration. 

Five hours credit. 

302. Differential Equations. 

A study of the more common types of ordinary differential 
equations, especially those of the first and second orders, with em- 
elementary mechanics and physics. 

Four hours lecture per week. 



CATALOGUE 51 



303. Theory of the Definite Integral. 

A course treating of the properties and methods of computing 
definite integrals ? including a study of approximation, improper 
definite integrals, Eulerian integrals, multiple integrals, with prob- 
lems and practical applications. 



PHILOSOPHY 

NOTE — The courses outlined below take three years for their 
completion, unless otherwise specified. 

201. Logic. 

Simple apprehension, classification of ideas; verbal terms, the 
classification and use; logical division, definition; judgments and 
propositions, thier division according to quality, quantity and mat- 
ter; opposition, equivalence, and conversion of propositions. Reason- 
ing; fundamental principles of reasoning; the syllogism, its laws, 
figures and modes, other forms of reasoning, induction, analogy; 
classification of arguments according to their validity; sophisms; 
method; the circle. Two hours credit. 

202. Applied Criteriology. 

Conceptual truth and the possibility of attaining it; state of the 
mind with regard to truth. Certitude; its nature, kind; Skepticism; 
the Methodical Doubt; opinion, trustworthiness of the human facul- 
ties for the attainment of truth; consciousness, the external senses; 
the intellect, Nominalism, Conceptualism, exagerated and moderate 
realism. Sources of certitude; human testimony; universal testi- 
mony; Divine testimony; tradition; History; the new criticism; objec- 
tive evidence. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Two hours credit. 

301. General Mytaphsics or Ontology. 

Being and its transcendental attributes; real being, logical being; 
extension, comprehension, analogy, unity, truth, goodness. State of 
being: Actual and possible; proximate and ultimate; foundation of 
intrinsic possibility. Kinds of being: substance, accident; the Aris- 
totelian categories. Causality. Causes in general; material, formal 
and efficient; the first cause; final cause; exemplary cause. Per- 
fection of being; simple and composite; finite and infinite; contin- 
gent and necessary; time and eternity; order, beauty, sublimity. 

Two hours credit. 



52 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

302. Cosmology. 

General properties of corporeal substance: quantity; continu- 
ous extension, condensation and rarefaction; impenetrability, space, 
place; motion, time; change, substance, accidents. Intrinsic con- 
stituents of corporeal substances; Atomism; Dynamism; Hylomorph- 
ism. Organic life; the vital principle, nutrition, growth; reproduc- 
tion; sensitive life, sense perceptions, sensuous appetite, spontaneous 
locomotions; the dynamic principle; the substantial form; Darwin- 
ism rejected. Two hours credit. 

304. Psychology. 

The human intellect and its proper object; its spirituality proved 
by its acts; origin of ideas; innate ideas; Empiricism and Ontologism 
rejected. The human will and its formal object; its freedom; its 
control of the other faculties. Nature of the human soul; a sub- 
stantial principle, simple, spiritual, immortal, its union with the 
body; its origin. The unity and antiquity of the human race. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Two hours credit. 

402. Special Metaphysics. 

The Existence of God; metaphysical, physical and moral proofs. 
The nature and attributes of God; His self -existence, infinity, unity, 
immutability, eternity and immensity 

His operative attributes; a. The Divine intelligence; His know- 
ledge of pure intelligence, of vision; scientia media of futuribles. b. 
The Divine will; Its holiness; Its primary and secondary objects; Its 
relation toward moral and physical evil. Action of God in the uni- 
verse; creation conservation; concurrence; Divine providence; mir- 
acles. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Two hours credit. '. 

403. General Ethics. 

Ethics defined. The material object of ethics; the human act, 
the voluntary, the free and deliberate, and the causes modifying the 
voluntary and the free. The foundation of morality; the ultimate 
end of man, the divine eternal law, the divine natural law. The 
formal object of ethics; the morality of human acts, the norm of 
morality, hedonism, utilitarianism, rationalism and moral positivism 
refuted, the determinants of morality, the proximate objective crite- 
rion of morality, conscience. 

404. Special Ethics. 

Rights and duties in general. Man's duties toward God. Man's 
duties toward himself. Man's duties toward others. Right of own- 
ership. Social system of collectivism. Socialism. Modes of acquir- 



CATALOGUE 53 



ing property. Society in general. The family. Divine institution, 
unity and indissolubility of marriage. Parental authority. Educa- 
tion. Civil society; its nature, origin, end. Origin of supreme civil 
authority. Specific forms of civil government. International law. 

Four hours credit. 

303. History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. 
Oriental Philosophy; Greek Philosophy; Christian Philosophy; 

The Gnostics; The Neo-Platonists ; the Fathers of the Church; 
Scholastic Philosophy; the Revival of Platonism, of Aristotelianism, 
of Atomism; the Secular Philosophers; the Political Philosophers. 

Two hours credit. 

304. History of Modern Philosophy. 

Descartes and his followers; Malbranche, Locke, Hume, Vol- 
taire, the Encyclopaedists; Leibnitz, the Scottish School ? the Trans- 
cendentalists; Kant, Fichte, Schelling and their schools of thought. 
The Neo-Kantians. Current Philosophical Theories. The Neo-Scholas- 
tics. Two hours credit. 

THE PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 

The Philosophy of Religion is a systematic study of religion in 
all its phases as known exclusively from the light of reason and well 
established historical facts. 

101-2. Comparative Religion. 

General notions of philosophy and religion; the definition and 
divisions of religion; a general history of the world's greatest relig- 
ions; the ways of distinguishing the true from the false religions; 
Rationalism, its history and final bankruptcy; revelation, its nature, 
necessity and history. 

201-2. Biblical Criticism. 

The historical value of the Old and New Testaments; a special 
study of the "Acts of the Apostles" from a historical and philosophi- 
cal viewpoint; inspiration, its meaning. Four hours credit. 

301-2. Analysis of Faith. 

Faith, its nature and norm; God, His Existence, Nature, Unity, 
and Trinity; the means of communication between God and Man. 

Four hours credit. 

401-2. Morality. 

Morality, its objective and subjective norms, namely Law and 
Conscience; Man's duties to himself, to his neighbor and to God. 

Four hours credit. 



SOCIOLOGY 

(Refer to page 56) 



54 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

PHYSICS. 
Phys. 201-2. General Physics. 

Mechanics, Sound, Light, Heat, Magnetism and Electricity. Pre- 
requisite: Plane Trigonometry. 

Lecture, two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

Given every year. 

Phys. 301-2. Physical Optics. 

Dispersion, interference, diffraction, double refraction, polari- 
zation, magneto-optics and spectroscopy... Prerequisite: Differential 
Calculus. 

Lecture, three hours per week. Six hours credit. 

Two semesters. 

Given 1932-'33; to be given 1934-'35. 

Phys. 303-4. Analytical Mechanics. 

A thorough study and mathematical treatment of Statics, Ki- 
netics. Prerequisite Differential and Integral Calculus, unless latter 
is taken concurrently. 

Lecture, three hours per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

To be given 1933-'34. 

Phys. 305-6. Experimental Physics. 

Advanced laboratory work in Mechanics, Molecular Physics, and 
Heat. Recommended to be taken with courses 303-4. Prerequisite: 
Courses 201-2. 

Laboratory six hours per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

Offered alternate years. 

Phys. 401-2. Experimental Physics. 
Advanced laboratory work in Electricity and Magnetism. This 
includes a practical study of the properties of direct and alternating 
currents and dynamo-electric machinery. 

Laboratory six hours per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

Given 1932-'33; to be given 1934-'35. 

Phys. 403. Electromagnetic Theory and Related Topics. 

Lecture, two hours per week. 

One semester. Two hours credit. 

Offered alternate years. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

Ample opportunity is offered the student for physical exer- 
cises, both indoor and outdoor. A well equipped gymnasium affords 
opportunity for apparatus work. Organized leagues in baseball, 
basketball and tennis help to make these sports more interesting, 



CATALOGUE 55 



and insure participation in them by a large number of students. A 
beautiful natural lake three minutes' walk from the College makes 
it possible to have swimming during almost the whole school year. 
Instruction is given in boxing, wrestling and in track work. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

101-2. American Government. 

American National Government. The historical background 
of the Federal Constitution and of political issues in the United 
States, and the organization and functions of the National Govern- 
ment. The President. The Cabinet. The Senate. The House of 
Represetatives. The Supreme Court and the Subordinate Federal 
Courts. Local and State Government in the United States. The 
place of the States in the Nation. The State Constitutions. The 
State Legislature. The State Courts. Organization and functions 
of administration in counties and cities. Six hours credit. 

201-2. Party Politics. 

The development of political parties in the United States. Im- 
portance of the extra-constitutional element in American Govern- 
ment. Party platforms. Presidential campaigns and elections. 
The nominating machinery; the Presidential primary and the 
nominating convention. Party patronage. The spoils system 
and civil service reform. State parties and practical politics in 
local government. Two Semesters. Six hours credit. 

301-2. American Government and Party Politics. 
A more general course adapted to the needs of students who 
"desire to make a less intensive study of the matter of Courses 1-4. 
Two semesters. Three hours credit. 

401-2. Constitutional Law. 

Fundamental principles of the United States Constitution 
viewed in the light of their history, development and application. 
The making of the Constitution. The Constitution regarded as a 
grant of power. Federal powers and State powers. The principle 
of "checks and balances." The doctrine of Judicial Supremacy. 
Constitutional Limitations on Legislative Power. Limits of the 
Police Power of the States. The Guarantees of the Fourteenth 
Amendment. Religious Liberty. The Fifteenth Amendment and 
the Negro Problem. State Constitutions. Two Semesters. 

Six hours credit. 
403. Comparative Government. 

A comparative study of the governmental organization and 
administration of the principal European nations. 

Three hours credit. 



56 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

101. Principles of Vocal Expression. 

Practical training in the fundamentals of effective speaking. 
Instruction on the management of the breath; methods of acquiring 
clear articulation; correct and refined pronunciation; direct, con- 
versational and natural speaking; inflection; qualities of voice and 
their use; purity, range and flexibility of tone. Individual criticism 
and conference with the instructor. One hour credit. 

102. Gesture and Technique of Action. 

The study of poise, posture, movement and gesture; spon- 
taneity of expression; correction of mannerisms; power and pathos; 
ease, grace and effectiveness of delivery. Class exercises, criti- 
cisms and conferences. One hour credit. 

201. Argumentation and Debating. 

A practical training for those students who have taken or are 
taking the course in oratory prescribed under English 4. Thought 
development; division and arrangement; argumentative, persuasive 
and demonstrative speeches; a finished argument and the fallacies 
of argument; the essentials of parliamentary law and practice; man- 
ner of conducting deliberative assemblies. Class exercises ? criti- 
cisms and conferences. One hour credit. 

202. The Occasional Public Address. 

Informal public address; the presentation of business proposi- 
tions before small or large audiences; impromptu and extempore 
speaking; after-dinner talks. Speeches for various occasions. Class 
exercises, individual criticisms and conferences. 

One hour credit. 
SOCIOLOGY 

301. Social History. 

A survey of ancient, medieval and modern social movements. 
Social value of Mosaic laws and Christian practice with special em- 
phasis on industrial democracy. A review of modern reforms, fac- 
tory legislation, workingman's compensation, social insurance, profit 
sharing and industrial co-operation. The Church in modern social 
problems. Three hours credit. 

402. General Sociology. 

An introduction to the scientific study of social problems and 
their relation to the family and the individual. A study of natural 
resources, population, immigration, labor organization, woman and 
child labor. Also problems of poverty, crime, housing, with a sur- 
vey of preventive work relating to the poor, defective and delin- 
quent. Two hours credit. 

402. Social Ethics. 



CATALOGUE 57 



An application of Christian ethics to economic and social phe- 
nomena. The origin and development of the family, marriage, and 
the social order. The ethics of property, liberalism, socialism and 
communism; capital and labor combines; strikes, lockouts and boy- 
cotts; public ownership and control; monopolies and modern 
finance; public health, control of education, traffic, etc. 

Two hours credit. 

403-4. Organized Charity. 

A study of conditions affecting the family and community. 
The purposes and methods of investigation, diagnosis and treatment 
studied by means of selected cases. Co-operation of public and 
private agencies is studied and inspection visits made to important 
institutions. Three hours credit. 

SPANISH. 

101. Elementary Spanish. 

Grammar: Garner. Alphabet, pronunciation, accentuation, 
punctuation and capitals. The article and noun; adjectives; numer- 
als; personal and demonstrative pronouns; auxiliary and regular 
verbs. For reading: Second Spanish Book, Worman and Bransby 
(complete). First semester. Three hours credit. 

102. Elementary Spanish (Continued). 

Grammar: Garner. Pronouns (continued) — relative, interroga- 
tive and indefinite. Auxiliary and regular verbs (repeated), ortho- 
graphic changes, formation of tenses, passive voice, reflexive verbs, 
impersonal verbs. For reading: Alarcon, El Capitan Veneno. Second 
semester. Three hours credit. 

201-2. Intermediate Spanish. 

Open to students who have completed Courses 1-2 or who have 
presented two units of Spanish for admission. Advanced grammar; 
idiomatic uses of the prepositions; irregular verbs, verbs requiring 
a preposition. Composition and conversation. Colma, Lecturas Re- 
creatives; Valera, El Pajaro Verde; Alarcon, Novelas Cortas. 

Six hours credit. 

301-2. Advanced Spanish. 

A detailed study of Spanish prose style, the reading of repre- 
sentative Spanish authors, composition and conversation. 

Six hours credit. 

103-4. Commercial Spanish. 

Practice in colloquial Spanish, commercial forms, letter-writ- 
ing and advertisements. Current journals and other literature deal- 
ing with the life and customs of South America and Spain. Reading 



58 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

of the geography, government, industries and commerce of these 
countries. Sax hours credit. 

303. Classical Prose. 

Selections from Cervantes, Don Quixote de la Mancha; St. The- 
resa, Life of; Ribadeneira, Historia del Cisma de Inglaterra, selec- 
tions. Kelly, History of Spanish Literature. Three hours credit. 

304. Classical Poetry. 

Fray Luis de Leon, poesias; Romancero General (Duran) ; 
Jorge Manriquo, Coplas, selections. Three hours credit. 

401. Modern Prose. 

Luis Coloma, Jeromin; Boy, La Reina Martir; Jose Maria 
Pereda, Penas arriba, Cuentos y novelas; Saj, Europa salvaje; Fer- 
nan Caballero, La Gaviota, Clemencia; Valvuena, Estudios Critices. 

Three hours credit. 

402. Modern Poetry. 

Selections from the writings of Alberto Risco, Jose Selgas, 
Nunez de Arce, Zorilla. Three hours credit. 

403. Spanish Drama and Oratory. 

Classical period: selections from the writings of Calderon and 
Lope de Vaga. Modern period: Tamayo y Baus, Los hombres de 
bien, Lances de honor; Nunez de Arose, El haz de lena. Oratory. 
Donoso Cortes and Nocedal, Discursos. Three hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 59 



The Department of Commerce 



OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Commerce, offers to the student 
a most thorough course in business administration com- 
bined with cultural subjects in order to cultivate the mind, 
to build thought and reasoning and that breadth of view 
which must ever be the foundation, as well of more ad- 
vanced scholarship, as of eminence in the commercial 
field. Its purposes are to prepare students for the fol- 
lowing occupational levels: (1) upper levels composed 
of proprietors and executives; (2) intermediate levels 
composed of department heads and minor executives ; and 
(3) lower levels composed of clerical and routine 
workers. 

The modern business world, highly complex in char- 
acter, is made up of a multitude of specialized units. 
These units not only compete, but also co-operate with 
each other in creating goods and services for the satis- 
faction of human wants. Those who would win success 
in the field of business must be familiar with the funda- 
mental elements of business management. They must 
develop facility in the use of quantitative instruments in 
the determination of business policies. They must recog- 
nize the larger relationships between business leadership 
and general social well-being. 

In addition to a thorough course in economics, bus- 
iness administration, and the other important branches 
of business, it affords the student a thorough training in 
mental philosophy and Christian ethics. 

At the completion of this course, in addition to ob- 
taining the degree, the student will also be prepared to 
take the State Certified Public Accountant's examination. 



60 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

The Department of Commerce occupies quarters in 
the Main Building and in Mobile Hall. The office of the 
Head of the Department is located in the Main Build- 
ing. The Dean of the College and the rest of the faculty 
members have offices in Mobile Hall. 

The accounting and statistical laboratories are in 
the Main Building. In these laboratories students are 
provided with desks, tables, adding machines, calculators 
and other types of equipment. Class rooms are located 
in both the Main Building and Mobile Hall. 

The Department does not have a special library or 
reading rooms. All books, reports, and magazines are 
located in The Thomas Byrne Memorial Library. Com- 
fortable reading rooms are maintained there for use of 
these books, reports, and magazines. 

LECTURES AND CLASS VISITS 

In connection with the work of this department, lectures are 
given at regular intervals on subjects in course by prominent busi- 
ness and professional men of the City of Mobile, and class visits are 
made at intervals to banks and industrial establishments for the 
purpose of observation and investigation. 

DEGREE 

The subjects offered in this department comprise a four-year 
course, which leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Com- 
merce. With a view to making the work of this department as 
practical as possible, text-book study and lectures are combined with 
the laboratory method and case system, thus affording the student 
abundant opportunity to test and apply the basic principles of mod- 
ern business. 



CATALOGUE 



61 



THE CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE 

FRESHMAN 



OF 



First Semester — 

Accounting Principles 3 hours 

Economic Geography 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Business Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



First Semester — 
Advanced Accounting 3 hours 
Principles of 

Economics 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Business Law 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Introd. to Philosophy.. 1 hour 



Second Semester — 
Accounting Principles 
Economic Geography 

Modern Language 

English 

Business Mathematics 

Public Speaking 

SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester — 
Advanced Accounting 
Principles of 

Economics 

English 

Modern Language 

Business Law 

Introd. to Philosophy.. 



First Semester — 
Accounting Systems 



3 hours 



Corporation Finance .. 3 hours 

Public Finance 3 hours 

History 3 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 



First Semester — 

Cost Accounting 3 hours 

Insurance 3 hours 

Elements of Statistics 3 hours 



JUNIOR 

Second Semester — 
Auditing and C. P. A. 

Problems 

Corporation Finance .. 

Banking 

History 

Philosophy 

SENIOR 

Second Semester — 
Income Tax Procedure 
Public Utilities .... . . 



Advertising and 

Salesmanship 3 hours 

Philosophy 7 hours 



Business 

Administration 

Marketing 

Philosophy 



3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
1 hour 



3 hours 

3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
2 hours 



3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 



3 hours 
3 hours 



3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 



SUBJECTS IN COURSE 

Subjects with odd numbers are given in the first semester 
and subjects with even numbers are given in the second semester. 

The number of hours given is the number of hours which the 
class meets per week. 

The number of credits is the number of semester credit hours 



62 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

earned by each student who receives a passing grade when the sub- 
ject is completed. 

Freshman Courses 100, Sophomore 200, Junior 300, and Senior 
400. 

Commerce 101. Economic Geography. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

A comprehensive survey of man's utilization of the earth in 
making a living; a study of the world's major regions and of their 
present and potential production of food and raw materials for 
manufacture. Special attention will be devoted to the South in 
general and to Alabama in particular. 

Commerce 102-E. Economic History of the United States. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

The economic development of the United States from the 
period of settlement to the present time; origin and growth of lead- 
ing American industries; changes in industrial organization; com- 
mercial policies; influence of economic conditions on political 
history; problems of expansion. 

105-6 Business Mathematics. See Mathematics. 

"'Commerce 111-112. Principles of Accounting. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Six credits. 

Meaning and purpose of accounting; the balance sheet; state- 
ment of profit and loss; accounts; construction of asset and 
proprietorship accounts; accounts with customers and creditors; 
adjusting and closing entries; books of original entry; controlling 
accounts; accruals and deferred items; partnerships; opening and 
closing corporation books. 

"'Commerce 201-E-202-E. Principles of Economics. 

Three hours. Six credits. 

An analysis of production, distribution, and consumption; 
theories concerning rents, profits, interest ad wages. A discussion 
of proposed remedies for inequality of distribution of wealth; 
single tax, government ownership, profit-sharing, co-operative 
enterprises. 

"'Commerce 211-212. Advanced Accounting. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Six credits. 

An advanced study in accounting theory and practice. Profits; 
statements at the end of the accounting period; partnerships; cor- 
porations; installment sales; agencies and branches; consignments; 
venture accounts; accounting for insolvent concerns and statement 
of affairs. 

"'Commerce 221-222. Business Law. 

Three hours. Six credits. 

Law in general, its definition, origin and sources; written and 



CATALOGUE 63 



unwritten law; law and equity jcontracts defined and classified; 
origin of property; title to personal property; mortgages and their 
uses. 

*301-E-302-E. Corporation Finance. 

Three hours. Six credits. 

Principles of financing; forms of business enterprises; the 
corporate form and its status before the low; owned and borrowed 
capital; basis of capitalization; sources of capital funds; disposi- 
tion of gross earning; budgets; reorganization. 

♦Subjects for which no credit is given unless both semesters 
are completed. 

Commerce 311. Accounting) Systems. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Three credits 

Study of reorganization in the form of consolidations, merg- 
ers, holdings companies, and trusts; description and explanation 
of the various accounting forms, books records, methods and sys- 
tems employed by various types of business. 

Commerce 312. Auditing and C. P. A. Problems. 

Two laboratory hours. Three credits. 

Quafilications, duties and responsibilities of the public auditor; 
exact rules covering every detail of making an audit of books and 
records of representative business concerns; methods of securing 
and handling engagements; working papers and audit reports; 
C. P. A. problems of an advanced nature presented and analyzed. 

Commerce 321-E. Public Finance. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

The evolution of securities; organized security markets and 
their economic functions; origin, development, purpose, and oper- 
ation of the New York Stock Exchange; the dangers and benefits 
of stock speculation; floor trader; specialist; odd-lot business; secur- 
ity deliveries, loans and transfers; the stock exchange and American 
business. 

Commerce 322. Banking. 

Three hours Three credits. 

Brief history of origin and development of banking; early 
banks and banking systems of United States; operation of the Fed- 
eral Reserve System; foreign banking systems; classes of credit 
and credit instruments; money, credit and prices; international 
exchange. 

Commerce 331-E. Transportation Principles. 

Three hours Three credits. 

Relation of transportation to industry and society; develop- 
ment and present status of American transportation systems; 
organization of transportation service; rates and regulations. 



64 SPRING HI LL COLLEGE 

Commerce 332-E. Foreign Trade. 

Three hours Three credits. 

Principles of international distribution; development of export 
markets; export and import machinery; trade regulation. 

Commerce 401-E. Elements of Statistics. 

Three hours Three credits. 

An introduction to statistics; a brief consideration of statistical 
theory; collection, classification and presentation of economic data; 
construction of graphs and charts; study of index numbers; prob- 
lems of statistical research. 

Commerce 402. Business Administration. 

Three hours. Three credits 

Methods of organizing and controlling the work of industrial 
establishments; selection of plant site; nearness to raw materials and 
to market; available labor supply; power and transportation; profit 
sharing; types of internal organization; office administration; per- 
sonnel; standards and records. 

Commerce 411. Cost Accounting. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Three credits. 

The need and value of cost accounting; classifications of cost; 
process cost systems and specific order cost systems; manufac- 
turing expense theory; accounting for material; accounting for labor 
costs; distribution of costs; debatable methods; relative values; 
establishment and uses of standard costs. 

Commerce 412. Income Tax Procedure. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Three credits. 

Revenue Act of 1928; returns for individuals; gross income; 
exempt income; deductions from gross income; computation of 
taxes; income tax procedure; returns for corporations; computation 
for corporation taxes; supplementary problems. 

Commerce 421. Advertising and Salesmanship. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

The specific purpose of advertising; the copy; slogans; trade- 
marks; newspapers; magazines; advertising research; preparing and 
making the sales presentation; overcoming objections and closing 
the sale; sales promotion. 

Commerce 422-E. Principles of Marketing. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

The marketing functions; marketing farm products; marketing 
raw materials; marketing manufactured products; distribution 
through brokers, jobbers, wholesalers, commission houses; market 
finance; market risk; market news; standardization; market price; 
the cost of marketing. 



CATALOGUE 65 



Commerce 431. Insurance. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

Underlying principles, important practices and principal legal 
phases of life, fire, marine, employers' liability, fidelity, corporate 
surety, title, and credit insurance; state regulation of companies; 
underwriters' associations and their work. 

Commerce 432-E. Public Utilities. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

Characteristics of public utilities; regulation by franchises and 
commissions; valuation; rate of return; rate structures; regulation 
of service, accounts and reports; public relations; public owner- 
ship. 

Commerce 441. Real Estate. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

What real estate is; the origin and development of real estate 
ownership; practical discussion of the details involved in the con- 
duct of transactions of real estate activity. 

Commerce 422. Investments. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

A study of the underlying principles of investment credit; ele- 
ments of sound investment and methods of computing net earings, 
amortization, rights and Convertibles; the investment policies of 
individuals and institutions; the investment market and its rela- 
tion to the money market. 

Commerce 450. Preparations for the C. P. A. Certificate. 

No credit. 

Questions and problems based on examination given by the 
American Institute of Accountants. Individual instruction given. 

Examinations for the certificate of Certified Public Account- 
ant are held in Montgomery twice a year, in May and November. 
Applications may be made to the Secretary of State. 

Biology, Chemistry, Drawing, Education, English, Evidences of 
Religion, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics, Phy- 
sics, Philosophy, Sociology, and Spanish — refer to the subjects in the 
Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

Note: The course in Commerce marked "E" are the same 
courses as those in Economics. For example, Commerce 201-E is 
the same as Economics 201, or Commerce 422-E is the same as 
Economics 422. 



66 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Department of Education 



The Department of Education of Spring Hill College 
was organized in August and September, 1931, in re- 
sponse to an actual need of many of its students. It began 
to function September 7, 1931, and opened its classes to 
students the following day. October 14 of the same yeai 
the Department of Education of the State of Alabama 
was formally petitioned to grant its approval of the cur- 
ricula of the college for the academic and professional 
training of teachers, and was invited to visit the institu- 
tion. In response to this invitaton, Dr. B. L. Parkinson, 
Director of Teacher Training, Certification and Elemen- 
tary Education, visited Spring Hill December 14, and in 
the due course of time, the following letter was received 
by the President: 

STATE OF ALABAMA 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

MONTGOMERY 

December 21, 1931. 
Rev. J. M. Walsh, President, 
Spring Hill College, 
Spring Hill, Alabama. 
Dear Father Walsh: 

It gives me pleasure to inform you that the organization of 
your curriculum, your teaching staff and your student teaching, as 
well as your equipment, meet the requirements for preparing teach- 
ers for secondary schools, and that we shall take pleasure in certifi- 
cating such of your graduates as you may recommend for the pro- 
fessional C and the professional B secondary certificates. 

In this connection allow me to thank you for the many courte- 
sies which you extended to me on last Wednesday when I was a 
visitor to your institution. 

With the season's greetings, I remain, 

Sincerely yours, 

B. L. Parkinson, 
Director of Teacher Training, Cer- 
tification and Elementary Ed- 
ucation. 



CATALOGUE 



67 



SECONDARY SCHOOL CERTIFICATES 



Class of 


Amount of 








Recom- 




Approved 






Scope 


mended 




Training 








Minimum 


Certificate 


Above H. S. 




Length of Validity 


of 


Beginning 




on which 








Monthly 




Based. 






Validity 


Salary 


C 


Three 




Three Years. Not 


Grades 


$ 85.00 




Years 




Renewable. 


7 to 12 




B 


Four 


Six 


Years. Permanent aft- 


Grades 


$ 95.00 




Years 


er 


four years of success- 


7 to 12 






(Bacca- 


ful 


teaching experience. To 








laureate 


remain permanently certi- 








Degree) 


fied holder must teach four 







years out of each six-year 
period of certificate's va- 
lidity. When this is not 
done, certificate may be re- 
instated when its holder 
earns 12 semester hours of 
credit in courses approved 
by State Board of Educa- 
tion. 



Five Six Years. Permanent aft- 

Years er four years of success- 
or More ful teaching experience. To 
(Master's remain permanently certi- 
Degree) fied, holder must teach four 
"years out of each six-year 
period of certificate's valid- 
ity. When this is not done, 
certificate may be rein- 
stated when its holder 
earns 12 semester hours of 
credit in courses approved 
by State Board of Educa- 
tion. 



Grades 

7 to 12 



$125.00 



SECONDARY CLASS C CERTIFICATE 

To be eligible for the Secondary Class C certificate as of July 
1, 1934, an applicant must present credentials showing 

(1) That he has completed the junior year of standard col- 
lege work; 

(2) That among his other credits he must present the fol- 
lowing: 

1. English Semester Hours 
a. Grammar and Composition 6 



68 SPRING HI LL COLLEGE 

b. Survey of English Literature 6 

2. History and Other Social Studies 

a. Introduction to History 6 

b. Political Science or Sociology or Economics 6 

3. Science (Biology recommended) 6 

4. General Psychology 6 

5. Education 

a. Educational Psychology 3 

b. Principles of High School Teaching 3 

c. Principles of Secondary Education.. 2 

d. Tests and Measures 2 

Total semester hours specified in first three years of 
training 46 

SECONDARY CLASS B CERTIFICATE 

To be eligible for the Secondary Class B certificate as of July 1, 
1934, an applicant must present credentials showing 

(1) That he holds a baccalaureate degree from an accredited 
college or university; 

(2) That he has to his credit basic courses as follows: 

1. English Semester Hours 

a. Grammar and Composition 6 

b. Survey of English Literature 6 

2. History and other Social Studies 

a. Introduction to History 6 

b. Political Science or Sociology or Economics... 6 

3. Science (Biology recommended) 6 

4. General Psychology 6 

(3) That he has to his credit courses in education as follows: 

Educational Psychology 3 

Principles of High School Teaching 3 

Principles of Secondary Education 2 

Tests and measures 2 

Materials and Methods of High School Teaching 5 

a. First field 3 

b. Second field 2 

Observation and Directed Teaching 3 

(One or both fields with not less than 30 full periods of class 
teaching.) 

Total Specified Education 18 



CATALOGUE 69 



In addition to these 18 specified hours of credit in education 
the applicant must offer six semester hours selected from the fol- 
lowing professional courses: 

Semester Hours 

The American School System 2 to 3 

Educational Sociology 2 to 3 

Character Education 3 to 2 

Mental Hygiene 3 to 2 

Introduction to Education 3 to 2 

Guidance 3 to 2 

Extra-curricular Activities 3 to 2 

(4) That he has to his further credit a 24 semester hour major 
in one field and an 18 semester hour minor in another field. 

SECONDARY CLASS A CERTIFICATE 

To be eligible for a Secondary Class A certificate as of July 1, 
1934, an applicant must present credentials showing 

(1) That he holds a Master's Degree or its equivalent from an 
accredited college or university; 

(2) That in the pursuit of this degree, he has followed a curri- 
culum approved by the Division of Teacher Training, Certification 
and Elementary Education. 

The following "Memorandum for Certification of High School 
Teachers" was issued by the Department of Education, State of 
Alabama. 

"To be eligible for the professional secondary certificate, a 
college graduate must present a major of twenty-four (24) semes- 
ter hours and a minor of eighteen (18) semester hours in any 
approved subject, with an additional eighteen (18) semester hours in 
education (24 specified hours beginning in 1934), three of which are 
in supervised observation and practice teaching. An approved sub- 
ject is any subject taught in the public schools of Alabama." 

"No subject that is not named in the course of study for the 
public schools of Alabama as a required or elective may be accepted 
as a major, minor or a sub-minor in meeting the minimum require- 
ments for either of the three types of certificates mentioned in 
previous paragraphs." 



70 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Degrees With a Major in Education 

In the Department of Education, Spring Hill College 
offers its students an opportunity of pursuing courses in 
educational subjects either for cultural or professional 
reasons. The curricula offered provide especially for pros- 
pective Junior and Senior High School teachers and other 
educational workers. 

To follow courses in the Department of Education, 
the approval of the Head of the Department and of the 
Dean of the College is required. These courses are not 
open to Freshmen, and no one in any year who manifests 
a faulty use of English either written or spoken or any 
other defect which in the judgment of the head of the 
Department renders him unfit for high school training 
will be permitted to pursue a major in the Department 
of Education. The normal load is sixteen semester hours 
plus two in religion. Where specific combinations require 
it, work amounting to seventeen semester hours plus two 
in religion will be permitted. A load of eighteen semes- 
ter hours plus two in religion is the maximum, and no 
student who has failed in any course at Spring Hill Col- 
lege will be allowed to carry the maximum load. 

The requirements for the bachelor's degree with a 
major in education include: 

(1) Every item of the requirements for the Sec- 
ondary Class B certificate to teach in the State of Ala- 
bama as given above. 

(2) Completion of one hundred twenty-eight se- 
mester hours of work with a grade of at least seventy in 
every course. 

(3) Satisfactory completion of all courses pre- 
scribed below for each respective degree. 

(4) At least the Senior year in residence at Spring 
Hill College. 



CATALOGUE 71 



(5) A written thesis approved by the Dean of the 
College and presented on or before May 1 of the year in 
which the degree is expected to be conferred. 

(6) A fee of fifteen dollars payable in advance. 

(7) Settlement of all indebtedness to Spring Hill 
College. 

Candidates for degrees must file their applications 
for them on or before May 1. 

The semester hour is the unit or standard for com- 
puting a student's work. A semester hour is one lecture 
a week for a session i.e. a half-year. Lectures are one 
hour in length. Two hours of laboratory work are the 
equivalent of one hour of lecture. One and one-half hours 
of work outside the class period are required for every 
lecture ; one-half of an hour, for every two-hour period of 
laboratory work. 

During the year of residence, twenty-four semester 
hours of work must be taken. 

A student's grade of scholarship in every course is 
determined by the combined results of examinations and 
monthly work as stated above. 

In marking, the percentage system is used. The 
passing grade is 70. In addition to quantity credits, 
which are given on completion of a course with a mini- 
mum of 70, quality points are granted according to the 
quality of work done. A grade of 75 to 84 gives the 
student one quality credit for each quantity credit; a 
grade of 85 to 94, two quality credits for each quantity 
credit, and a grade of 95 to 100, three quality credits for 
each quantity credit. Quality credits are computed from 
the student's grade for the year. Information concerning 
grades is published at regular intervals at the office of 
the Dean of the College but not by professors. 

The Faculty reserves the right to refuse a degree to 
any student who fails to attend courses of lectures or 



72 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



other exercises which are or may be prescribed prior to 
graduation, even though no scholastic credit is given for 
such courses or exercises. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM OF COURSES FOR THE A. B. 
WITH A MAJOR IN EDUCATION 

FRESHMAN 



First Semester- 
English 3 hours 

Latin 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Introduc'n to History 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Latin 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Introduc'n to History 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



16 

First Semester — 

English 3 

Latin 3 

Modern Language 3 

Natural Science 

(Biology 

recommended) 4 

Introd'n to Philosophy 1 
Introd'n to Education 2 
Public Speaking 1 



16 
SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester — 

hours English 3 hours 

hours Latin 3 hours 

hours Modern Language 3 hours 

Natural Science 
(Biology 

hours recommended) 4 hours 

hour Introd'n to Philosophy 2 hours 

hours The Americal School 

hour System 2 hours 



17 



17 



JUNIOR 

First Semester — Second Semester — 

General Psychology .. 4 hours Educat'n'l Psychology 3 hours 

Social Science: Social Science: 

Sociology or Sociology or 

Economics 3 hours Economics 3 hours 

Principles of Secon- Principles of High 

dary Education 2 hours School Teaching ... . 3 hours 

Extra-curricular Approved Electives .... 7 hours 

Activities 3 hours — 

Tests and Measures.... 2 hours 16 

Approved Elective 2 hours 



16 



CATALOGUE 73 



SENIOR 

First Semester — Second Semester — 

General Psychology .. 2 hours Philosophy 4 hours 

Philosophy 4 hours Materials and Methods 

Materials and Methods of High School 

of High School Teaching 3 hours 

Teaching 2 hours Observation and Prac- 

Observation and Prac- tice Teaching l%hrs. 

tice Teaching l^hrs. Approved Electives .... 7 hours 

Approved Electives .... 7 hours — 



16% 



16% 



N. B. For a Secondary Class B Certificate to teach in Alabama, 
the State Department of Education requires 

A major of 24 semester hours in education; 

A major of 24 semester hours in an approved subject; and 

A minor of 18 semester hours in another approved subject. 

A. B. WITH A MAJOR IN EDUCATION 



To satisfy the scholastic requirements for the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts with a major in Education, each candidate must pass 
128 semester hours of work. The following courses are prescribed 
for candidates for this degree: 

Cultural: Semester Hours 

English 12 

Latin 12 

Modern Foreign Language 12 

Mathematics 6 

Introduction to History 6 

Sociology or Economics 6 

Natural Science ; 8 

Philosophy (Including 6 in psychology) 18 

Professional: 

Introduction to Education 2 

The American School System 2 

Principles of Secondary Education 2 

Extra-curricular Activities 3 

Principles of High School Teaching 3 

Tests and Measures 2 

Educational Phychology 3 



74 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (minor field). ... 2 
Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (major field).... 3 

Observation and Practice Teaching 3 

Teaching Major and Minor: 

In addition to the above requirements, the candidate must have 
completed a major of 24 semester hours in one approved teaching 
field and a minor of 18 semester hours in another. For this degree, 
the major must be selected from group I below; the minor, from 
group I or group II. 
Group I: Group II: 

English Latin 

French Spanish 

History Biology 

Mathematics Physics 

Chemistry 

A composite major of 32 semester hours or minor of 24 semes- 
ter hours in cognate subjects may be selected with the written 
approval of the faculty adviser, provided a minimum of 16 semester 
hours in the case of the major, or of 12 in that of the minor be 
taken in one subject. Such a composite will be permitted in 

Natural Science (any combination of Physics, Chemistry and 
Biology fulfilling the above requirement) ; 

Foreign Language (Latin in combination with French or 
Spanish) ; 

Mathematics (in combination with Physics) ; 

Social Science (History in combination with Sociology). 

B. S. WITH A MAJOR IN EDUCATION 



To satisfy the scholastic requirements for the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science with a major in Education, each candidate must pass 
128 hours of work. The following courses are prescribed for can- 
didates for this degree: 

Cultural: Semester Hours 

English 12 

Modern Language 12 

Mathematics 6 

Introduction to History 6 

Sociology or Economics 6 

Natural Science 8 

Philosophy 18 



CATALOGUE 75 



Professional: Semester Hours 

The American School System ..... 2 

Principles of Secondary Education 2 

Extra-curricular Activities 3 

Principles of High School Teaching 3 

Tests and Measures 2 

Educational Psychology 3 

Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (minor field).... 2 

Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (major field). ... 3 

Observation and Practice Teaching > 3 

Teaching Major and Minor: 

In addition to the above requirements, the candidate must 
have completed a major of 24 semester hours in one approved teach- 
ing field and a minor of 18 semester hours in another. The cultural 
courses mentioned above may be counted towards the completion of 
this major and minor. For this degree, the major must be selected 
from group I below, the minor, from group II. 

Group I: Group II: 

English Spanish 

French Biology 

History Physics 

Mathematics Commerce 
Chemistry 

A composite major of 32 semester hours or minor of 24 in 
cognate subjects may be selected with the written approval of the 
faculty adviser, provided a minimum of 16 semester hours in the 
case of the major, or of 12 in the case of the minor be taken in one 
subject. Such a composite will be permitted in 

Natural Science (any combination of Physics, Chemistry, and 
Biology fulfilling the above requirement) ; 

Mathematics (in combination with Physics) ; 

Social Science (History in combination with Sociology). 



76 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM OF COURSES FOR THE B. 
WITH A MAJOR IN EDUCATION. 

FRESHMAN 



s. 



First Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Modern language 3 hours 

Natural Science 

(Biology 

recommended) 4 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

[ntroduction to 

History 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Modern Language .... 3 hours 
Natural Science 

(Biology 

recommended) 4 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Introduction to 

History 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



17 
SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester — 

hours English 3 hours 

hours Modern Language .... 3 hours 

Mathematics (5) or 
hours Natural Science .... 4 hours 

hours History 3 hours 

Introduction to 

hour Philosophy 2 hours 

The American School 

hours System 2 hours 

hour — 

17 



17 

First Semester — 

English 3 

Modern Language .... 3 
Mathematics (5) or 

Natural Science .... 4 

History 3 

Introduction to 

Philosophy 1 

Introduction to 

Education 2 

Public Speaking 1 

17 

JUNIOR 

First Semester — Second Semester- 
General Psychology .. 4 hours Educational 
Social Science Psychology 

Sociology or Social Science 

Economics 3 hours Sociology or 

Principles of secondary Economics 

Education 2 hours Principles of High 

Extra-Curricular School Teaching 

Activities 3 hours Approved Electivo.s 

Tests and 

Measures 2 hours 

Approved Elective .... 2 hours 



3 hours 



3 hours 



.. 3 

.. 7 

16 



hours 
hours 



16 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 77 



SENIOR 

First Semester — Second Semester — 

General Philosophy 4 hours 

Psychology 2 hours Materials and methods 

Philosophy 4 hours of High School 

Materials and methods Teaching 3 hours 

of High School Observation and 

Teaching 2 hours Practice Teaching .. 1 V2 hrs. 

Observation and Approved Electives .. 7 hours 

Practice Teaching .. T% hrs. — 

Approved Electives .. 7 hours 15 Y 2 

I6Y2 

N. B. For a Secondary Class B Certificate to teach in Ala- 
bama, the State Department of Education requires: 
A major of 24 semester hours in education, 
A major of 24 semester hours in an approved subject and, 
A minor of 18 semester hours in another approved subject. 

B. S. WITH A MAJOR IN COMMERCIAL EDUCATION. 



To satisfy the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science with a major in Commercial Education, each candidate must 
pass 128 hours of work. The following courses are prescribed for 
candidates for this degree: 

Cultural: Semester Hours. 

English 12 

Modern Foreign Language 12 

Mathematics 6 

Introduction to History 6 

Sociology or Economics 6 

Natural Science 8 

Philosophy (including 6 in Psychology) 18 

Professional: Semester Hours. 

Introduction to Education 2 

The American School System 2 

Principles of Secondary Education 2 

Extra-curricular Activities 3 

Principles of High School Teaching 3 

Tests and Measures 2 

Educational Psychology 3 



78 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (minor field) .. 2 
Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (major field).... 3 
Observation and Practice Teaching 3 

Teaching Major and Minor: 

In addition to the above requirements, the candidate must have 
completed a major of 24 semester hours in one approved field and 
a minor of 18 semester hours in another. Cultural courses men- 
tioned above, if in the chosen teaching fields, may be counted to- 
wards the completion of the teaching major and minor. For this 
degree, the major must be Commerce. The minor must be selected 
from the following group: 



English 




Mathematics 


French 




Biology 


Spanish 




Chemistry 


History 


Economics 


Physics 



A composite minor of 24 semester hours in cognate subjects 
may be selected with the written approval of the faculty adviser, 
provided a minimum of 12 semester hours be taken in one subject. 
Such a composite will be permitted in: 

Natural science (any combination of physics, chemistry and 
biology fulfilling the above requirement) ; 

Mathematics (in combination with physics) ; 

Social science (history in combination with sociology) ; 

Commerce and economics, (in any combination fulfilling the 
above requirement). 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM OF COURSES FOR THE B. S. 
WITH A MAJOR IN COMMERCIAL EDUCATION 



First Semester — 

English 3 

Modern Foreign 

Language 3 

Introduction to 

History 3 

Business 

Mathematics 3 

Accounting 

Principles 3 

Public Speaking 1 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester — 
hours English 3 hours 

Modern Foreign 
hours Language 3 hours 

Introduction to 
hours History 3 hours 

Business 
hours Mathematics 3 hours 

Accounting 

hours Principles 3 hours 

hour Public Speaking 1 hour 



16 



16 



CATALOGUE 



79 



SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester — 

hours English 3 hours 

Modern Foreign 

hours Language ... .. 3 hours 

Advanced 

hours Accounting 3 hours 

Natural Science 
(Biology 

hours recommended) 4 hours 

hour Introduction to 

Philosophy 2 hours 

hour The American School 

System 2 hours 

hours — 

17 



First Semester — 

English 3 

Modern Foreign 

Language 3 

Advanced 

Accounting 3 

Natural Science 

(Biology 

recommended) 4 

Public Speaking 1 

Introduction to 

Philosophy 1 

Introduction to 

Education 2 

17 

JUNIOR 

First Semester — Second Semester — 

General Psychology ... . 4 hours Educational 

Principles of Psychology 3 hours 

Economics 3 hours Principles of 

Corporation Finance .. 3 hours Economics 3 hours 

Principles of Second- Corporation Finance .. 3 hours 

ary Education 2 hours Principles of High 

Extra-curricular School Teaching .... 3 hours 

Activities 3 hours Approved Elective .... 3 hours 

Tests and — 

Measures 2 hours 15 



17 

First Semester — 
General Psychology .. 2 

Philosophy 4 

Business Law 3 

Statistics 3 

Materials and 

Methods of High 
School Teaching .... 2 
Observation and Prac- 
tice Teaching 1 



SENIOR 

Second Semester — 

hours Philosophy 4 hours 

hours Marketing 3 hours 

hours Business Law 3 hours 

hours Materials and 

Methods of High 
School Teaching .... 3 hours 
hours Observation and Prac- 
tice Teaching 1% hrs. 

% hrs. Approved Elective ~~ 2 hours 



15% 



16% 



80 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

N. B. For a Secondary Class B Certificate to teach in Alabama : 
the State Department of Education requires: 
A major of 24 semester hours in education, 
A major of 24 semester hours in an approved subject and 
A minor of 18 semester hours in another approved subject. 

SUGGESTED PROGRAM OF COURSES IN 
EDUCATION 

FIRST SEMESTER SOPHOMORE WINTER SESSION 

Education 297 Introduction to Education 2 hours a week 

SECOND SEMESTER SOPHOMORE SPRING SESSION 

Education 202 The American School System 2 hours a week 

THIRD SEMESTER JUNIOR WINTER SESSION 

Education 335 Principles of Secondary Education 2 hours a week 
Education 335X Extra-curricular activities 2 hours lecture and 

3 hours laboratory a week. 
Education 321 Tests and measures 2 hours a week 

FOURTH SEMESTER JUNIOR SPRING SESSION 

Education 336 Principles of High School Teaching 3 hours a wk. 
Education 308E Educational Psychology 3 hours a week 

FIFTH SEMESTER SENIOR WINTER SESSION 

Education 400M Materials and Methods of High School Teach- 

ing (Minor Field) 2 hours a week 
Education 435T Observation and Practice Teaching IY2 hours 

a week 
SIXTH SEMESTER SENIOR SPRING SESSION 

Education 400M Materials and Methods of High School Teaching 

(Major Field) 3 hours a week. 
Education 436T Observation and Practice Teaching 1% hours 

a week 

COURSES OF STUDY IN EDUCATION 

Education 297. Introduction to Education 

Two Semester Hours. 

Winter session, Monday and Wednesday at 1:00 p. m. Room 
107, Mobile Hall. Fr. De Potter. 

This is a survey course which is required of all student teach- 
ers during their first semester. Its purpose is to acquaint the stu- 
dents with the various special fields of the science of education. It 
begins with the historical development of education, and indicates 
the various philosophies of education as they are encountered. It 
studies the various national and state systems in our own and in 
foreign countries, with special emphasis on the great three-fold di- 



CATALOGUE 81 



vision in use in this country and comprising elementary, second- 
ary and higher education. It insists upon a knowledge of the learn- 
ing process as discovered in the study of general and educational 
psychology. Finally it considers the strategic position of education 
in the battle against the social evils of the present day. 

Education 202. The American School System. 

Two Semester Hours. 

Spring Session, Monday and Wednesday at 1:00 p. m. Room 
107, Mobile Hall. Fr. De Potter. 

This course begins with a study of the origin and development 
of the various school systems, denominational and public, in the 
United States, section by section. It then takes up the advance- 
ment made in elementary, secondary and higher education. The 
treatment of such topics as professional education, technical and 
agricultural education, the preparation of teachers, art and manual 
education, commercial education, educational extension, profession- 
al societies, regional and national educational associations is in- 
cluded in the course. 

Education 308E. Educational Psychology. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring Session, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday at 2:00 p. m. 
Room 106, Mobile Hall. Fr. Bassich. 

This course considers the nature, function and measurement of 
the original tendencies of the individual, and the modifications of 
them which the school endeavors to bring about. That this purpose 
may be better effected, the student is directed in the study of the 
laws of learning, the learning curve, the efficiency and permanence 
of learning, transfer of training, the result of exercise, the meas- 
urement of achievement, the use of tests, the new type examina- 
tions. 

Education 321. Tests and Measurements. 

Two Semester Hours. 

Winter Session, Tuesday and Friday at 2:00 p. m. Room 107 
Mobile Hall. Fr. Bassich. 

Course 321 first discusses the nature of tests and the help which 
they render in the solution of instructional and administrational 
problems in the secondary school. It discusses the new methods of 
objective measurement and some of the best known standardized 
tests of mental ability and of achievement in high school subjects. It 
then considers the uses to which test results may be put, and con- 
cludes with a discussion of norms and standards and of a few of 
the most commonly used statistical measures. 



82 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Education 335. Principles of Secondary Education. 

Two Semester Hours. 

Winter session, Monday and Thursday at 2:00 p. m. Room 107 
Mobile Hall. 

This course studies the individual at the stage of his secondary 
Education, his native and acquired tendencies to action, and deduces 
principles by which the teacher may be guided in his attempt to 
direct the interest and secure the attention of the pupil. Among 
the topics considered are: the aims in instruction, the class exercise; 
the essentials of good questioning, the modes of instruction; the 
importance of study; the prelection or assignment; the repetition or 
recitation; standards and measurements; the individual and social 
elements in secondary instruction. 

Education 336. Principles of High School Teaching . 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring session, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday at 2:00 p. m. 
Room 107 Mobile Hall. 

The purpose of this course is to give the student of education 
the proper concept of the present day high school. While course 
335 deals with the essentials of technique for the apprentice teacher, 
course 336 discusses some of the procedures which go to make up 
the professional skill of the master teacher. Among these are super- 
vision of pupil study, teaching how to study, the technique of visual 
instruction, socialized class procedure, project teaching and the ad- 
justment of instruction to the varying abilities of the pupil. 

Education 435-436T. Observation and Practice Teaching*. 

One and one-half or Two Semester Hours each Session. Sched- 
ule to be arranged by each student individually with the head of the 
department of education. 

In order to supplement its instruction in educational principles, 
aims, methods, curricula and procedure, and to cultivate professional 
skill in teaching, Spring Hill College has secured the cooperation of 
the Spring Hill High School. Through the courtesy of its adminis- 
trators and teachers, Spring Hill High School thus becomes the 
proving ground for the professional students of the department of 
education, who have free access to its classrooms for observation of 
the methods practiced therein and for supervised practice teach- 
ing. Cooperating with the State Department of Education, Spring 
Hill College requires that its candidates for degrees with a major in 
education present a minimum of 3 semester hours in observation 
and practice teaching with a minimum of 30 full periods of class 
teaching. 



CATALOGUE 83 



Education M. Materials and Methods of High School Teaching. 

Winter session, two semester hours; Spring session, three semes- 
ter hours. 

The object of this course is to give the student an intimate 
knowledge of the reason, aim and material of the chief subjects 
found in the high school curricula, and the recognized methods by 
which they are taught. The student should emerge from the course 
with a correct perspective of the subject studied and with such a 
comprehensive view of its proper distribution that he should be ca- 
pable of constructing in it a satisfactory curriculum. Students are 
advised to choose their major and minor teaching fields at the be- 
ginning of their sophomore year, and are required to do so before 
its close, and to notify the head of the department of education con- 
cerning their choice. 

Education 335X. Extra-curricular Activities. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Winter session, Tuesday and Thursday at 1:00 p. m. Labora- 
tory, Monday and Wednesday at 1:00 p. m, Room 107 Mobile Hall, 
Mr. Donahue. 

The purpose of this course is to instruct the students of edu- 
cation in the importance of student participation in school activities 
outside the classroom. Considerable time is devoted to the theory 
and practice of the teaching of athletic sports, football, baseball, 
basketball, track sports and boxing. The fundamental principles of 
various football systems, rules, training, special plays are among 
the topics dealt with. There is explicit insistence upon the transfer 
of training in punctuality, promptitude in the execution of plays 
and other desirable qualities from the field of play to the regular 
work of the school and of after life. Among other student activi- 
ties discussed, are the following: student council, class organization; 
club, the poetry club, the dramatic club, the literary society, the 
debating society; musical organizations — the choir, the glee club 
the band , the orchestra; the assembly; the commencement; the li- 
brary; the study hall; the athletic association; school publications — 
the annual, the school magazine; publicity and public relations. 

Education 460M. Materials and Methods of Teaching Com- 
mercial Subjects. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring session, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday at 1:00 p. m. 
Room 110 Mobile Hall. 

Education 462M. Materials and Methods of Teaching English. 

Three Semester Hours. 



84 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Spring session, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday at 1:00 p. m. 
Room 207 Mobile Hall. 

Education 466M. Materials and Methods of Teaching History. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring session, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday at 1:00 p. m. 
Room 210 Mobile Hall. 

Education 469BM. Materials and Methods of Teaching Biology 

Two Semester Hours. 

Winter session, Tuesday and Thursday at 1:00 p. m. Biology 
lecture room, Yenni Hall. 

Education 469PM. Materials and Methods of Teaching Physics. 

Two Semester Hours. 

Winter session, Tuesday and Friday at 1:00 p. m. Physics lec- 
ture room, Yenni Hall. 

Education 470CM. Materials and Methods of Teaching Chem- 
istry. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring session, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at 1:00 p. 
m. Chemistry lecture room, Yenni Hall. 

Education 472M. Materials and Methods of Teaching French. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring session, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday at 1:00 p. m. 
Room 110, Mobile Hall. 

Education 475M. Materials and Methods of Teaching Latin. 

Two Semester Hours. 

Winter session, Monday and Friday at 1:00 p. m. Room 106, 
Mobile Hall. 

Education 477M. Materials and Methods of Teaching Spanish. 

Two Semester Hours. 

Winter session, Wednesday and Friday at 9:00 a. m. Room 
106, Mobile Hall. 

Education 494M. Materials and Methods of Teaching Physi. 
cal Education. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Spring session, Tuesday, and Thursday at 1:00 p. m. Labora- 
tory, Monday and Wednesday at 1:00 p. m. 

(History 101A. Introduction to History. 

Three semester hours. 

Winter session, Monday at 1:00 p. m., Tuesday and Friday at 
9 a. m. 

The aim of this course is to orient the student so that he may 
view in its proper setting the status of the world today. That this 
may be done in a reasonable way, the contributory causes to the 



CATALOGUE 85 



present intellectual, moral and religious culture are traced from 
their probable origins. In the same way the progressive stages 
of the world's economic and political development as recorded in 
history are followed from the remote past to the present actual 
situation. 

History 102. Introduction to History. 
Three semester hours. 

Spring session, Monday at 1:00 p. m. and Tuesday and Friday 
at 9:00 a. m. 

This course is a continuation of course 1A. It reviews the 
revolution in industry brought on by the machine age, with the 
new view point of human values in the disregard of inherent rights. 
It points out the sociological and economic problems arising from 
the centralization of capital and mass production which followed 
in the wake of new discoveries in science and inventions in indus- 
trial machines. The new facilities in world communication and 
transportation are considered together with the complicated sys- 
tems of distribution and finance which they connote. The social 
conditions of the world and more especially of the United States 
are treated, and the various fields of study which specifically deal 
with the problems discussed in this course are pointed out to the 
student. 

General Psychology 307P. 
Four semester hours. 

Winter session, Monday, Tuesday and Thursday at 3:00 p. m., 
Wednesday at 2:00 p. m. 

This course deals with the laws by which human reason must 
be governed in order to act conformably to its nature, and so to 
form correct and true judgments. It considers separately two dis- 
tinct sets of laws: one that our thought may be correct and con- 
sistent or conformed to the necessary laws of thinking; the other 
that our thought may be true or conformed to the objective reality 
of things. 

General Psychology 407. Philosophy 8. 
Two semester hours. 

Winter session, Monday and Thursday at 11:00 a. m. 
Psychology 407 studies that principle in man by which he lives, 
feels, thinks and wills. It takes account, however, only of those 
vital acts which are characteristic of man and distinguish him from 
all other living things in the visible world. The student is first 
furnished with the data which his own consciousness and that of 
other men supply as to the characters of the vital acts of thought 
and violation. From these acts he is directed to reason back to the 
nature of the principle from which they proceed, its relation to the 



86 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



body, its origin. From what it does, he gathers what it must be. 
Thus he gets a natural knowledge of the essence, origin and destiny 
of the soul scientifically, by both induction and deduction. 

PROGRAM OF COURSES IN EDUCATION 



Mon. 



Tues. 



Wed. 



Thurs. 



Fri. 



1st 2nd 1st 2nd 1st 2nd 1st 2nd 1st 2nd 

Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. 
Education Education Education Education Education 



1933-1934 
A. M. 9:00 



177M 



P. M. 1:00 297 202 475M 460M 297 202 

466M 466M 

470M 470M 470M 

335X 494M 335X 494M 335X 494M 335X 494M 



477M 



460M 475M 460M 
466M 



2:00 335 



1934-1935 
P. M. 1:00 



2:00 



836 



336 



335 



336 



308E 308E 308E 

297 202 462M 297 202 462M 462M 

469BM 468M 469BM 468M 468M 

469PM 472M 472M 469PM 472M 

335X 494M 335X 494M 335X 494M 335X 494M 494M 



321 



321 



KEY 



Education 202 
Education 297 
Education 308E 
Education 321 
Education 335 
Education 335X 
Education 336 
Education 436T 
Education 460M 

Education 462M 



The American School System. 
Introduction to Education. 
Educational Psychology. 
Tests and Measures. 
Principles of Secondary Education. 
Extra-curricular activities. 
Principles of High School Teaching. 
Observation and Practice Teaching. 
Materials and Methods of Teaching Commer- 
cial Subjects. 
Materials and Methods of Teaching English. 



CATALOGUE 



87 



Education 


466M 


Education 


468M 


Education 


469BM 


Education 


469PM 


Education 


470CM 


Education 


472M 


Education 


475M 


Education 


477M 


Education 


494M 



Materials and Methods of Teaching History. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Mathe- 
matics. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Biology. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Physics. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Chemistry. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching French. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Latin. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Spanish. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Physical 
Education. 

SUBJECTS IN COURSE 
DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

BIOLOGY: 

101-2 General biology. 

201 Comparative anatomy of the vertebrates. 
302 Vertebrate embryology. 

202 Microscopic technique. 
301 Bacteriology. 

401 Histology. 

402 Introduction to general physiology. 
404 General physiology. 

The Mendel club. 
Introduction to research. 
104 Genetics. 

CHEMISTRY: 

101 General inorganic chemistry. 

102 Elementary qualitative analysis. 

201 Qualitative analysis. 

202 Quantitive analysis. 
203-4 Organic chemistry. 

301 Physical chemistry. 

302 Materials of engineering products. 
305-6 Physiological chemistry. 



Commerce 101 
Commerce 102E 
Commerce 111 -112 
Commerce 201E-202E 
Commerce 211 -212 
Commerce 221 -222 
Commerce 301E-302E 



COMMERCE: 
Economic geography. 
Economic history of the United States. 
Accounting principles. 
Principles of economics. 
Advanced accounting. 
Business law. 
Corporation finance. 



88 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Commerce 311 Accounting systems. 

Commerce 312 Auditing and C- P. A. problems. 

Commerce 321 Public finance. 

Commerce 322 Banking. 

Commerce 331E Transportation principles. 

Commerce 332E Foreign trade. 

Commerce 401E Elements of statistics. 

Commerce 402 Business administration. 

Commerce 411 Cost accounting. 

Commerce 412 Income tax procedure. 

Commerce 421 Advertising and salesmanship. 

Commerce 422E Principles of marketing. 

Commerce 431 Insurance. 

Commerce 432E Public utilities. 

Commerce 441 Real estate. 

Commerce 442 Investments. 

DRAWING; 
101-2 Mechanical drawing. 
106- 

201 Descriptive geometry. 
205 Topographical drawing. 

202 Machine drawing. 
103-4 Anatomical drawing. 
204 Architectural drawing. 
301 Architectural design. 

EDUCATION: 

The American School System. 

Introduction to Education. 

Educational Psychology. 

Tests and Measures. 

Principles of Secondary Education. 

Extra-curricular Activities. 

Principles of High School Teaching. 

Observation and Practice Teaching. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Commer- 
cial Subjects. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching English. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching History. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Mathe- 
matics. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Biology. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Physics. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Chemistry. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching French. 



Education 202 
Education 297 
Education 308E 
Education 321 
Education 335 
Education 335X 
Education 336 
Education 436T 
Education 460M 

Education 462M 
Education 466M 
Education 468M 

Education 469BM 
Education 469PM 
Education 475M 
Education 472M 



CATALOGUE 89 



Eduction 475M Materials and Methods of Teaching Latin. 
Education 477M Materials and Methods of Teaching Spanish. 
Education 494M Materials and Methods of Teaching Physical 
Education. 

ENGLISH: 
1 Rhetoric and composition. 

101 Advanced rhetoric. 

102 Poetry. 

201 Oratory. 

202 The Drama. 

301 The English novel. 

302 Shakespeare. 

303 Aesthetics and literary criticism. 

304 The essay. 
401-2 Journalism. 

305-6 English and American literature. 

EVIDENCES OF RELIGION: 

101 Christian revelation; the Church. 

102 The Church; God and salvation. 

201 Creation and redemption. 

202 Grace and the sacraments. 

301 The sacraments; morality and virtue; escatology. 

302 Divine worship; Christian perfection. 

401 Sacred scripture. 

402 Scripture reading; ecclesiastical history. 

FRENCH: 
101-2 Elementary French. 
201-2 Intermediate French. 

301 Modern French prose. 

302 French poetry of the nineteenth century. 
402 The French drama. 

GERMAN: 
101-2 Elementary German. 
201-2 Intermediate German. 
301 German prose writers. 

401-2 The German epic. 



GREEK: 

1 For beginners. 

2 Xenophon. 



90 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

101-2 Homer. 

201 Demosthenes. 

202 Demosthenes; Aeschylus. 

301 Plato. 

302 Herodotus, Thucydides. 

401 Sophocles. 

402 Aristophanes. 

HISTORY: 

History 101 A Introduction to history. 
History 102A Introduction to history. 

101 Early medieval history. 

102 The middle ages. 

201 Renaissance and revolution. 

202 Europe since 1814. 

301 American history since the reconstruction period. 

LATIN: 

1-2 Elementary grammar. 

3 Cicero. 

4 Virgil. 

101-2 Virgil, Horace Cicero. 

201-2 Horace, Cicero. 

301 Horace, Virgil, Juvenal. 

302 Cicero, Quintilian. 

401 Plautus, Terrence. 

402 Pliny, Seneca. 

403 Ecclesiastical Latin. 

MATHEMATICS: 

1 Advanced algebra. 

2 Geometry. 

101 College algebra. 

102 Plane trigonometry. 

103 Spherical trigonometry. 

104 Surveying. 

201 Plane analytic geometry. 

202 Solid analytic geometry. 
204 Differential calculus. 

301 Integral calculus. 

302 Differential equations. 

303 Theory of definite integral. 



CATALOGUE 91 



PHILOSOPHY: 

201 Introduction to logic. 

202 Introduction to epistomology. 
301-A Logic. 

301-B Criteriology or applied logic. 

302-A General metaphysics or ontology. 

302-B Cosmology. 

402 Special metaphysics. 
401 Psychology. 

403 General ethics. 

404 Special ethics. 

303 History of ancient and medieval philosophy. 

304 History of modern philosophy. 

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION: 
101-2 Comparative religion. 
201-2 Biblical criticism. 
301-2 Aanalysis of faith. 
401-2 Morality. 

PHYSICS: 

201-2 General physics. 

301-2 Advanced physics. 

303-4 Electricity and magnetism; radio activity; the electron 
theory. 

305-6 Experimental physics. 

403 Electric oscillations and electromagnetic waves; radio com- 
munication. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 
POLITICAL SCIENCE: 

101-2 American government. 

201-2 Party politics. 

301-2 American government and party politics. 

401-2 Constitutional law. 

403 Comparative government. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING: 

101 Principles of vocal expression. 

102 Gesture and technique of action. 

201 Argumentation and debating. 

202 The occasional public address. 

SOCIOLOGY: 
301 Social history. 

401-2 General sociology. 



92 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

302 Social ethics. 
403-4 Organized charity. 

SPANISH: 

101-2 Elementary Spanish. 

201-2 Intermediate Spanish. 

301-2 Advanced Spanish. 

103-4 Commercial Spanish. 

303 Classical prose. 

304 Classical poetry. 

401 Modern prose. 

402 Modern poetry. 

403. Spanish drama and oratory. 

OBSERVATION AND PRACTICE TEACHING 



1. Every student who is preparing to teach is advised to select 
at the beginning of his Sophomore year the two high school sub- 
jects that he wishes to teach. The one which he prefers will be 
known as his major teaching field; the other, as his minor teach- 
ing field. He will be required to make his selection before the end 
of his Sophomore year, and to notify the head of the department of 
education concerning his choice. 

2. Every student will earn a minimum of twenty-four semes- 
ter hours in his major field, and a minimum of eighteen semester 
hours in his minor field. 

3. The student must take a course of three semester hours in 
the materials and methods of teaching his major subject, and of two 
semester hours in the materials and methods of teaching his minor 
subject. 

4. He will arrange with the head of the department of educa- 
tion to take observation and practice teaching in the high school in 
a class of either his major or his minor subject to the extent of three 
semester hours or more, according to the requirements of the school 
system in which he plans to teach. After having made the arrange- 
ment with the departmental head, the student will report to the 
principal of the high school and then to the teacher to whose class 
he has been assigned for observation and practice teaching. 

5. The student will inform himself as to the number of se- 
mester hours of observation and practice teaching required in the 
State or the school system in which he is to teach. If four semester 
hours are demanded, the student will be required to be present in 
the high school class for a full period on each of two successive days. 
The first day, he will observe; the second, he will himself conduct 



CATALOGUE 93 



the class during the entire period. If he will be required to have 
only three semester hours in observation and practice teaching, he 
will observe during one-half of the period the first day, being pres- 
ent for the prelection or assignment for the following day. The sec- 
ond day, he must conduct the class during the entire period. This 
routine will be followed week after week for two semesters, the 
student teacher reporting the same days every week. A minimum 
of thirty full periods of supervised teaching will be required for 
credit. 

6. The student teacher is to pay strict attention to the super- 
vising teacher the first day, especially while the latter is giving the 
prelection or assignment. At the end of the period, he will inquire 
what the supervising teacher wishes him assign in the following per- 
iod. During the time of study, the student teacher will prepare 
carefully both the matter of the recitation (or repetition) which he 
is to conduct and that of the assignment (or prelection) which he is 
to give the following day. 

7. At the end of a period of practice teaching, or, preferably, 
at some other time in the course of the day, the student teacher 
will of his own accord go to the supervising teacher and ask for a 
criticism of his practice teaching. 

8. Once the student teacher has been assigned to a class for 
observation and practice teaching, the high school principal is re- 
quested to place his name on the class roll, and the supervising tea- 
cher, to check his presence or absence on the days on which he is 
expected to report, in the same way in which this is done for pupils. 

9. The supervising teacher is requested to point out the de- 
fects of the student teacher so that the latter may become aware of 
them and endeavor to remove or at least diminish them, and his good 
qualities so that he recognize them, evaluate them correctly and de- 
velop them. 

10. The supervising teacher is requested to rate the student 
teacher and to give the grade of the latter to the principal at the 
end of each month. In giving this grade, the supervising teacher is 
asked to base his judgment upon the following qualities as mani- 
fested by the student teacher: 

(a) Personality (giving evidence of authority, tact, sym- 
pathy and other desirable qualities. ) 

(b) Control of subject matter. 

(c) Control of method. 



94 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Student Organizations 

As college education is accomplished not only dur- 
ing the hours of class, but also in no small degree during 
the students' intercourse with each other at other periods, 
the College heartily encourages all student organizations 
which help to develop in the student initiative, self- 
reliance and leadership in organized religious and social 
movements, qualities which are expected of college men 
generally. 

The policy of the faculty with regard to all kinds 
of college activities is that a student's first duty in col- 
lege is attention to study, and that no other student activ- 
ity should be allowed to interfere with this main purpose 
of college life. 

ELIGIBILITY RULES 

Students taking part in dramatic performances, pub- 
lic debates, oratorical or elocution contests, intercollegi- 
ate athletics and fraternities are subject to the following 
eligibility rules : (1) Actual class attendance and applica- 
tion must be satisfactory; (2) Students must have no con- 
ditions and no failures. 

SPRING HILL STUDENT COUNCIL 

The Spring Hill Student Council is elected by the 
Student Body to safeguard the honor and traditions of 
the College and to promote and direct its activities, with 
the approval of the faculty. 

MEMBERS 

Wilton J. Smith Senior 

Peter Skeffington Senior 

Carl Shirk Junior 

William P. Hardie Junior 

Eugene LeCompte - Sophomore 

Robert Kearns Sophomore 

Roger Ching Freshman 

OFFICERS 

Wilton J. Smith President 

Peter Skeffington Vice-President 

William P. Hardie. Secretary-Treasurer 



CATALOGUE 95 



SODALITY OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION. 

The purpose of this Sodality is to develop Christian 
character under the protection of the Mother of Christ 
and to cultivate the lay apostolate. The Sodality en- 
deavors to attain this end by conducting weekly meetings 
at which the office of the Blessed Virgin is recited and 
instructions are given by the Director and by organizing 
sections for the promotion of special activities. Meetings 
are 'held Wednesday night at 8:30. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Edward T. Cassidy, S. J , Moderator 

William P. Hardie Prefect 

William C. McDonough ■ Sub-Prefect 

Paul Kurzweg Secretary-Treasurer 

Huyet W. Fitzsimmons First Consultor 

James Hynes Second Consultor 

APOSTLESHIP OF PRAYER— LEAGUE OF THE SACRED 

HEART. 

This Association aims at training its members in the 
practice of prayer and other good works by seeking in 
them the interests of the Sacred Heart of Jesus : "The 
glory of God and the good of souls." Meetings are held 
once a month. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Edgar J. Bernard, S. J Moderator 

John S. Daniel Prefect 

SAINT JOHN BERCHMAN'S SANCTUARY SOCIETY 

The object of this Society is to contribute to the 
beauty and solemnity of Divine Worship by the accurate 
performance of liturgical ceremonies. The members are 
accorded the privilege of serving the priests at the altar. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Edward T. Cassidy, S. J Moderator 

John S. Daniel Prefect 

THE MENDEL CLUB. 

The object of this club is to foster interest in biologi- 
cal research work. Meetings are held once a week, at 
which papers are read by individual members, dealing 
with the results of private work. Twice a month, some 
eminent biologist or physician is invited to address the 
club. The club publishes a monthly paper, "The Men- 
delian", devoted to biological subjects. 



96 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

OFFICERS. 

Rev. Patrick H. Yancey, S. J Moderator 

John L. Boland President 

John Dyer Vice-President 

Thomas Gaughan Secretary 

Robert J. Lawler Treasurer 

THE SPRINGHILLIAN. 

The Springhillian, formerly a quarterly publication, 
is now published monthly. It is edited by the students 
under the direction of a member of the faculty to encour- 
age self-expression and literary ambition among the stu- 
dents, and to record current events of the College. 

STAFF 

Rev. Chas. J. Quirk, S. J Moderator 

Woodrow W. Brunson Editor-in-Chief 

Brett R. Patton and Wilfred M. Leatherwood Associates 

William P. Hardie Literary 

Frank J. Skeffington Contributing 

John S. Daniel Business, Advertising, Circulation, etc. 

Walter E. Roney Assistant 

John W. Kopecky Assistant 

Michael F. O'Rourke Assistant 

Edmund R. Vogelgesang and John G. Boehm Exchanges 

Lawrence P. Artman and J. Robinson Henry Sports 

THE CORSAIR 

The purpose of the Corsair is to record, through pic- 
tures and accounts, the events of the year and in this way 
to catch for future years the spirit of Spring Hill. 

STAFF 

Rev. Chas. J. Quirk, S. J Moderator 

M. Carter McFarland Editor-in-Chief 

Robert J. Lawler Associate Editor 

Frank Skeffington Business Manager 

John L. Boland Sports Editor 

John Dyer Art Editor 

John M. Callahan Assistant Business Manager 

Emmett Goodman Assistant Business Manager 

Brett R. Patton Circulation Manager 

THE PHYSICS CLUB 

The purpose of this club is to promote a greater 
interest in physics. It is essentially a study club. At its 



CATALOGUE 97 



meetings which are held bi-monthly on Wednesday nights 
at seven o'clock, demonstrations present the matter dis- 
cussed in class, and verify the importance of physics. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Anthony J. Westland, S. J Director 

Chas. Houssiere, Jr. President 

Eugene LeCompte Vice-President 

Charles Duffy Secretary 

Theodore Polito Librarian 

THE PORTIER LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETY. 

This Society is named in memory of the learned and 
saintly prelate, the Rt. Rev. Michael Portier, D.D., first 
Bishop of Mobile, who founded the College in 1830. 

Membership is open to all students and is attained 
by those who demonstrate their literary ability to the 
satisfaction of the Society. 

The members hold weekly meetings on Sunday at 
8:30 P. M. at which they engage in literary and forensic 
exercises. They also stage entertainments for the student 
body at intervals during the year and a public dramatic 
production once a year. The College Debating Team is 
chosen from this Society. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Francis Janssen, S. J. Moderator 

Thomas Gaughan President 

M. Carter McFarland Vice-President 

Paul Kurzweg Secretary 

Charles R. Houssiere, Jr Treasurer 

THE SPRING HILL CLEE CLUB 

This organization has for its aim the desire to excel 
in vocal music. Its membership is open to all students 
who are interested in vocal expression. It has one essen- 
tial requirement, however, and this is attendance at the 
practices, which are held twice a week, Monday and 
Thursday at 4:00 P. M. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Thomas J. Shields, S. J Moderator 

Mr. Peter Colvin Director 

Peter Skeffington President 

Roger Ching Librarian 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



SPANISH CLUB 

This organization, slightly over a year old, was 
formed primarily to sponsor an interest in the study of the 
Spanish language and countries which have this language 
for their natural tongue. 

OFFICERS 

Brett R. Patton President 

Chas. Houssiere Vice-President 

Jack Potts Secretary 

George Corrigan Treasurer 

Carlos Chico 
Louis Rojas 
Wilfred Leatherwood 

Counsellors 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Spring Hill endeavors to keep in touch with its former 
students, and takes pride in their achievements. The Col- 
lege has been greatly helped by certain organizations 
formed by the Alumni in different cities for the purpose 
of fostering the recollections of their college days, and 
working for the interest of their Alma Mater. These are : 

Augusta Spring Hill College Club 
Georgia Club of Spring Hill College 
New Orleans Spring Hill College Club 
Thibodaux Spring Hill College Club 
Montgomery Spring Hill College Club 
Washington Spring Hill College Club 
Chicago Spring Hill College Club 
New York Alumni of Spring Hill College, Inc. 
The St. Louis Chapter of the Alumni Association of Spring 
Hill College 



CATALOGUE 99 



One Hundredth and Second 
Annual Commencement 

OF 

Spring Hill College 

FRIDAY, MAY 20, 1932 

COLLEGE CAMPUS 
Spring Hill College 

PROGRAM 

Grand March — "War March" (from Athalia) 

F. Mendelssohn 

The Spring Hill Orchestra 

* * * 

President's Address Rev. Joseph M. Walsh, S. J. 

* * * 

ADDRESS TO THE GRADUATES 
Mr. W. C. Griggs, 

Sup't of Education, Mobile Co. and City 

* * * 

Waltz — "Song of Love" (from Blossom Time) F. Schubert 
The Spring Hill Orchestra 

* * * 

AWARD OF MEDALS 

* * * 

"Alma Mater" Prof. A .J. Suffich, Mus. B. 

* * * 

VALEDICTORY 

Charles Vincent Shannon 

* * * 

DEGREES CONFERRED 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Henry Clifford Alexander George Gordon McHardy 

Allan Roff Cameron, Jr. James Edwin Stuardi 

Frank Theophile Gouax, Jr. Dennis Tilford Sullivan 

Thomas Bain Henderson John Patrick Sweeney, III 

Thomas Edward Hicks Richard Gibbons Touart 

Oliver Francis Kuppersmith Bernard Joseph J. Washichek 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 
Frank Joseph Lott Afred John Owings, Jr. 

George Chambers Low Charles Vincent Shannon 



100 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE 
Warren Robert Aitkens James Thomas Lynch 

*Marcel Raymond Bellande Burnett Francis Mabry 

Joseph Edward Bilgere David Earl Mattina 

Gerald Maurice Boylan James Hart McCown 

Granville W. Foster Peyton Norville, Jr. 

Walter Thomas Gibbons Buvens Louis Prevost 

Harry Leftwich Hargrove, Jr. Joseph Francis Quinn 

Louis Kurhan Joseph Michael Walsh 

Sidney William Zukerman 
*Degree conferred February 7, 1933. 

BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY 
Harry Boland Van Nice 

"Live On! Washington" Rev. C. C. Chapman, S. J. 

The Spring Hill Orchestra 

Prizes 

THE JOSEPH BLOCK MEMORIAL MEDAL, for proficiency in 
Music, was founded by his children: Edward Block, of New 
York, Alexander Block, Mrs. Bettie Haas, Mrs. Emma Eichold, 
Mrs. Fannie B. Simon of Mobile. 

This medal was won in 1932 by Joseph M. Walsh. 
THE BISHOP O'SULLIVAN MEMORIAL MEDAL, founded in honor 
of the Most Rev. Jeremiah O'Sullivan, D. D., Bishop of Mobile, 
for excellence in Christian Doctrine and Ecclesiastical History. 
This medal was won in 1932 by James H. McCown. 
Next in merit, Brett R. Patton, Charles V. Shannon. 
THE HUTCHISON MEDAL, founded by Miller Reese Hutchison, 
E. E., Ph. D., for the best thesis in Philosophy. 

This medal was won in 1932 by James H. McCown. 
Next in merit, Charles V. Shannon. 
THE MERILH MEDAL, founded by Edmund H. Merilh, B. S, '17, of 
New Orleans, La., for the best English assay. 
Not awarded. 
THE WALSH MEMORIAL MEDAL, founded in memory of William 
A. Walsh, A. B. '08, for excellence in Oratory. 

This medal was won in 1932 by William P. Hardie. 
Next in merit, Dennis T. Sullivan. 
THE O'CALLAGHAN MEDAL, donated by Rev. J. McDermot, in 
memory of Rev. C. T. O'Callaghan, D. D., for the best paper in 
Latin. 

Not awarded. 



CATALOGUE 101 



THE MASTIN MEDAL, founded by William M. Mastin, M. D., 
LL. D., for the best paper in General and Organic Chemistry. 
Not awarded. 

THE STEWART MEDAL, donated by D. D. Stewart, M. D., for the 
best paper in Biology. 
Not awarded. 

THE DEPORTMENT MEDAL, founded by the Most Reverend 
Edward P. Allen, D. D., for Excellent Deportment, to be awarded 
by the votes of the students, with the approbation of the faculty. 

This medal was won in 1932 by Huyet W. Fitzsimmons. 

Next in merit, William P. Hardie, Charles V. Shannon, George 

McHardy, and Allan R. Cameron, Jr. 

THE MATT RICE SERVICE CUP, founded by the Omicron Sigma 
Fraternity in memory of Matthew P. Rice, A. B., '19, a founder 
of the Fraternity and a loyal Springhillian, to be awarded to 
the student, who, during the year, has rendered the greatest 
service to the College. 

This cup was awarded in 1932 to William P. Hardie. 



102 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



CLASS ROLL 



FRESHMEN 



Agee, Clinton, B. 
Beall, Philip 
Bedford, Stephen K. 
Bixler, Emanuel H., Jr. 
Bordelon, Joseph Y. 
Bordelon, Warren 
Boyd, A. Harry- 
Brock, Lewis 
Brunson, Paul 
Chico, Carlos 
Ching, Roger B. 
Ching, William 
Combel, Theodore 
Connors, Frank 
Cook, James W. 
Crittenden, James R. 
Douville, Walter 
Ely, Richard 
Erichsen, Julius 
Evans, Alan 
Farrell, Emmett, 
Franklin, Edward 
Fulford, Briesten 
Fullton, James 
Gares, Everett I. 
Gonzales, Alphonse 
Gordon, Frank 
Haas, Frank E. 
Hampshire, Leonidas 
Hargrove, Jack 
Hart, Edward 
Hatcher, Reginald W. 
Henderson, Kenneth 
Henry, John R. 
Hester, Willard B. 
Houssiere, Jules A. 
Jarvis, Andrew 
Jordan, Joseph 
Karl, Erhard C. 
Kearns, Numa F. 
Kelly, Donald 



Kimble, Raymond 
Lawler, Edward 
LiRocchi, Theodore 
Lovelace, Edward L. 
Martin, William J. 
Mayton, Wallace 
McCown, Lawrence 
McDonald, John L. 
McDonnell, William P. 
McKenzie, Fraser B. 
Miller, Bertrand A. 
Miller, Cecil Woodville 
Mims, John 
Moore, P. Blake 
Morgan, John Dayton 
Nicks, James F. 
O'Rourke, Michael F. 
Pearce, Lee 
Pearce, Reginald D. 
Pennington, Julius 
Quina, William R. 
Repoll, John 
Rojas, Luis 
Roney, Herbert J. 
Seifert, Marshall E. 
Shannon, Thos. B. 
Schroeter, Herbert 
Simpson, Francis H. 
Skeffington, James 
Slavin, Nathan 
Smith, Otis F. 
Smith, Ritterhouse 
Spafford, Edward 
Starke, John H. 
Stein, Louis James 
Stoma, Pete 
Suffich, William 
Taube, William 
Thornton, William 
Traynor, Charles E. 
Waller, Charles L. 



CATALOGUE 



103 



Walsh, Daniel J. 
Webb, Buckner G. 
Wettermark, Alfred 



Wheeler, Charles 
Wulff, Donald E. 
Zieman, John A. 



SOPHOMORES 



Alves, Walter J. 
Angle, Lanier Perry 
Artman, Lawrence P. 
Aycock, Clarence C. 
Blake, William A. 
Boland, John L. 
Braswell, Jefferson B. 
Callahan, John M. 
Crane, Joseph A. 
Dowds, James J. 
Duffy, Charles W. 
Duffy, Daniel J. 
Dyas, Edmund C. 
Dyer, John Lewis 
Elsevier, William 
Ernst, Roy 
Fort, Marshall 
Helmsing, Joseph 
Hope, John Crawford 
Irby, Walter Harold 
Kearns, Robert J. 
Kerrigan, Thomas Edward 



Lamb, Nicholas 
Lawler, Robert J. 
LeCompte, Eugene J. 
O'Donnell, James P. 
O'Neal, Edward H. 
O'Shea, Francis Matthew 
O'Shea, Peter Starks 
Palmes, Jack E. 
Patton, Brett Royston 
Powell, Marion 
Power, Daniel 
Richerson, La Velle 
Schenk, Joseph Adrian 
Sitterle, Julius 
Skeffington, Francis J. 
Sweeney, Martin Odell 
Switzer, John E. 
Thompson, LeRoy 
Van Antwerp, Garet 
Weinacker, Hobert 
White, William Pope 
Wogan, Philip 



JUNIORS 



Abell, Edward C. 
Bailey, Joseph A. 
Blount, Willard H. 
Boehm, John George 
Daniel, John S. 
Davis, Fletcher E. 
DeMouy, Louis F. 
Dischler, Nicholas 
Donahue, John Donald 
Driscoll, Raymond 
Duggar, Lloyd 
Feore, James J. 
Goodman, Emmett 
Hardie, William P. 
Houssiere, Charles 



Houssiere, Ernest A. 
Ropecky, John W. 
Leatherwood, Wilfred 
Maisel, Irving 
Mason, John Holder 
North, William 
Petro, Daniel 
Potts, John Patrick 
Putnam, Richard J. 
Roney, Walter 
Schwing, Jules 
Shirk, Carl R. 
Sneer inger, Leo Frank 
Spafford, James R. 
Stein, Herbert M. 



104 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Stein, Thomas F. 
Travis, John J. 



Vardaman, Douglas 
Vignes, Sparks 



Vogelgesang, Edmund. 



SENIORS 



Bellande, Marcel R. 
Beyt, John Lamar 
Breen, James P. 
Brousse, Valsin L. 
Brunson, Woodrow W. 
Carlen, Ernest J. 
Caviezel, Joseph 
Copelancl, Charles 
Corrigan, George 
Fitzsimmons, Huyet W. 
Gaughan, Thomas J. 
Hynes, James Horace 
Kaufman, Guy C. 
Kurzweg, Paul H. 



Mattei, Harry 
McDonough, William C. 
McFarland, M. Carter 
Newburn, George W. 
Ory, Oscar Richard 
Polito, Theodore James 
Richard, Charles W. 
Riley, Elmo 

Skeffington, William P. 
Smith, Wilton J. 
Tonsmeire, James M. 
Toulmin, Ashby H. 
Tyrrell, Joseph G. 
Wilson, John E. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 
Eastman, Harvey James Taylor, Charles Bancroft 



SATURDAY CLASSES— 1932- , 33 



Mrs. Emily R. Acree 

Miss Gladys Alanzo 

Mr. Edgar Barre 

Miss Mary Margaret Barter 

Miss Kathryn Barbour 

Miss Doris Bender 

Mr. Frank Bogue 

Miss Loretta Bogue 

Mr. Louis Boudousquie 

Miss Audrey Burns 

Mrs. Pat. Byrne 

Miss Harriet Casper 

Miss Jane Casper 

Mrs. Eva Lee Caviezel 

Miss Elsie Mae Collins 

Miss Annie Mary Clolinger 

Mr. Peter J. Colvin 

Mr. John Daniel 

Mrs. Ruth Douglas 

Miss Mary Sands Dreisbach 

Miss Mary M. Flock 



Miss Alice Anne Fowler 
Miss Mary F. Goodman 
Miss Josephine E. Hargrove 
Miss Ordolia Hargrove 
Miss Helen Catherine Head 
Miss Dacey Holcombe 
Miss Elizabeth Herndon 
Miss Helen Hunter 
Miss Laura Jackson 
Miss Genevieve Jarvis 
Miss Isabel Kehoe 
Miss Modesta L. Keoghan 
Miss Kathleen Laubenthal 
Mrs. Marion Larcade 
Mr. Norton LeGear, Jr. 
Miss Catherine Lining 
Miss Anna Mary McCreary 
Miss Eunice McCreary 
Miss Hermione McMahon 
Miss Katherine G. Mahoner 
Mr. Jos. Manifold 



CATALOGUE 105 


Miss Elizabeth Mayers 


Miss Marguerite Smith 


Mrs. Clara Mayhall 


Mr. John J. Sullivan 


Mrs. Claude Mullen 


Miss Eloise B. Taylor 


Miss Dorothy Murray 


Miss Lois E. Turner 


Miss Zillah Paterson 


Mrs. Charles B. Vaughan 


Mr. Charles Peavy 


Miss Genevieve Walsh 


Miss Elizabeth Penny 


Miss Marie Wilkins 


Miss Hazel Pflager 


Miss Mary Lelia Williams 


Miss Celestine Pratt 


Miss Genevieve Wilson 


Miss Mary App. Pritchard 


Miss Catherine Yeend 


Miss Dorothy Quina 


Miss Fidelis Yeend 


Miss Edith Reynalds 


Mrs. W. J. Young 



BROTHERS OF THE SACRED HEART 

Brother Albert Lents 
Brother Roger Zinkan 



Brother Maximim Alford 
Brother Aiden Cronin 



SISTERS OF CHARITY 
Sister Mary Ellen Sherlock 

SISTERS OF THE HOLY GHOST 
Sister Mary Paschal Hanley 
Sister Mary Matthew Macken 
Sister Mary Bernadine O'Loghlen 
Sister Mary Helena Percival 

SISTERS OF LORETTA 
Sister Mary Borromeo Hynes 
Sister Mary Clotaire Thro 

SISTERS OF MERCY 

Sister Mary Isadore Cahill 
Sister Mary Elizabeth Carr 
Sister Mary Dorothy Cummins 
Sister Mary Aiden Donaldson 
Sister Mary Benigna Hunt 
Sister Mary Celine Lennon 
Sister Mary Ann Patrice Rigney 



SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH 
Sister M. Costanza McDonnell 
Sister M. Dominica Rupp 
Sister M. Ernesta Scharfenberger 



106 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1932 33 

Abell, Edward C Kentucky 

Agee Clinton, B Alabama 

Alves, Walter J. Alabama 

Angle, Lanier P Alabama 

Artman, Lawrence P Florida 

Aycock, Clarence C Louisiana 

Bailey, Joseph A Pennsylvania 

Beall, Philip.. Florida 

Bedford, Stephen K , Missouri 

Bellande, Marcel R Mississippi 

Beyt, Lamar . Louisiana 

Bixler, Emanuel H., Jr Alabama 

Blake, William A Alabama 

Blount, Willard Alabama 

Bbehm, John G Missouri 

Boland, John L Missouri 

Bordelon, J. Y Louisiana 

Bordelon, Warren Louisiana 

Boyd, A. Harry Alabama 

Braswell, J. B Alabama 

Breen, James P Tennessee 

Brock, Lewis Alabama 

Brousse, Valsin Louisiana 

Brunson, Paul Alabama 

Brunson, Woodrow Alabama 

Callahan, John M Arkansas 

Carlen, Ernest Alabama 

Caviezel, Joseph Alabama 

Chico, Carlos San Salvador 

Ching, Roger .....Tennessee 

Ching, William Tennessee 

Combel, Theodore Alabama 

Connors, Frank Alabama 

Cook, James W. Alabama 

Copeland, Charles Arizona 

Corrigan, George F Florida 

Crane, Joseph A. Alabama 

Crittenden, James R Alabama 

Daniel, John S Louisiana 

Davis, Fletcher, E Alabama 



CATALOGUE 107 



DeMouy, Louis Alabama 

Dischler, Nicholas Louisiana 

Douville, Walter Alabama 

Donahue, J. Donald.... Alabama 

Dowds, James J - Arkansas 

Driscoll, Raymond Connecticut 

Duffy, Charles Illinois 

Duffy, Daniel J Illinois 

Duggar, Lloyd L Alabama 

Dyas, Edmund C Alabama 

Dyer, John L Louisiana 

Eastman, Harvey . Alabama 

Elsevier, William Alabama 

Ely, Richard Alabama 

Erichsen, Julius Alabama 

Ernst, Roy Illinois 

Evans, Alan Alabama 

Farrell, Emmett Alabama 

Feore, James J Alabama 

Fitzsimmons, Huyet Louisiana 

Fort, Marshall Alabama 

Franklin, Edward , Alabama 

Fulford, Briesten Alabama 

Fullton, James Alabama 

Gares, Everett I Louisiana 

Gaughan, Thomas .....Arkansas 

Gonzales, Alphonse Alabama 

Goodman, Emmett Alabama 

Gordon, Frank M Alabama 

Haas, Frank E Alabama 

Hampshire, Leonidas Alabama 

Hardie, William P Florida 

Hargrove, Jack - Alabama 

Hart, Edward Alabama 

Hatcher, Reginald Georgia 

Helmsing, Joseph Alabama 

Henderson, Kenneth Alabama 

Henry, John R Mississippi 

Hester, Willard B ... . Alabama 

Hope, John C Alabama 



108 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Houssiere, Charles Louisiana 

Houssiere, Ernest Louisiana 

Houssiere, Jules A Louisiana 

Hynes, James Horace Illinois 

Irby, Walter Harold Alabama 

Jarvis, Andrew Alabama 

Jordan, Joseph Alabama 

Karl, Erhard C Alabama 

Kaufman, Guy C Louisiana 

Kearns, Numa F Alabama 

Kearns, Robert J Alabama 

Kelly, Donald ..Alabama 

Kerrigan, Thomas Tennessee 

Kimble, Raymond V Arkansas 

Kopecky, John W Texas 

Kurzweg, Paul H Louisiana 

Lamb, Nicholas Missouri 

Lawler, Edward, A. .Alabama 

Lawler, Robert J Missouri 

Leatherwood, Wilfred Alabama 

LeCompte, Eugene J Louisiana 

LiRocchi, Theodore Louisiana 

Lovelace, Edward L Alabama 

Maisel, Irving Alabama 

Martin, William Alabama 

Mason, John Holder ....Florida 

Mattei, Harry Alabama 

Mayton, Wallace, Alabama 

McCown, Lawrence Alabama 

McDonald, John L Alabama 

McDonnell, William P Alabama 

McDonough, William C Georgia 

McFarland, M. Carter Florida 

McKenzie, Fraser B Alabama 

Miller, Bertrand A Alabama 

Miller, Cecil W Alabama 

Mims, John Alabama 

Moore, P. Blake Alabama 

Morgan, John Dayton Alabama 



CATALOGUE 109 



Newburn, George Alabama 

Nicks, James Alabama 

North, William E Alabama 

O'Donnell, James P Mississippi 

O'Neal, Edward H Alabama 

O'Rourke, Michael Alabama 

Ory, Oscar Richard Louisiana 

O'Shea, Francis Matthew Mississippi 

O'Shea, Peter Starks Mississippi 

Palmes, Jack Alabama 

Patton, Brett R Texas 

Pearce, Lee Tennessee 

Pearce, Reginald Alabama 

Pennington, Julius Alabama 

Pero, Daniel Alabama 

Polito, Theodore ..-.„ Missouri 

Potts, John Patrick Kansas 

Powell, Marion .Alabama 

Power, Daniel E Tennessee 

Putnam, Richard Johnson Louisiana 

Quina, William Alabama 

Richard, Charles Alabama 

Richerson, LaVelle Alabama 

Repoll, John Alabama 

Riley, Elmo Alabama 

Rojas, Luis Guatemala 

Roney, Herbert Illinois 

Roney, Walter Illinois 

Schenk, Joseph A Missouri 

Schroeter, Herbert Alabama 

Schwing, Jules B Louisiana 

Seifert, Marshall Alabama 

Shannon, Thomas Louisiana 

Shirk, Carl ...Louisiana 

Simpson, Francis ..Mississippi 

Sitterle, Julius Alabama 

Skeffington, Francis J Georgia 

Sheffington, James Georgia 

Skeffington, W. Peter Georgia 

Slavin, Nathan New York 



110 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Smith, Otis Alabama 

Smith, Ritterhouse ... Alabama 

Smith, Wilton J Louisiana 

Sneeringer, Leo F Alabama 

Spafford, Edward Alabama 

Spafford, James Alabama 

Starke, John H Alabama 

Stein, Herbert M Alabama 

Stein, Louis J * Alabama 

Stein, Thomas F Alabama 

Stoma, Pete Louisiana 

Suffich, William Alabama 

Sweeney, Martin Alabama 

Switzer, John Louisiana 

Taube, William Alabama 

Taylor, Charles B...__ Alabama 

Thompson, Leroy Alabama 

Thornton, William Alabama 

Tonsmeire, James New York 

Toulmin, Ashby H Alabama 

Traynor, Charles Georgia 

Travis, John J Missouri 

Tyrrell, Joseph G Alabama 

Van Antwerp, Garet Alabama 

Vardaman, Douglas Mississippi 

Vignes, Sparks Mississippi 

Vogelgesang, Edmund Alabama 

Waller, Charles Alabama 

Walsh, Daniel Louisiana 

Webb, Buckner G Alabama 

Weinacker, Robert ..Alabama 

Wettermark, Alfred Louisiana 

Wheeler, Charles ..Florida 

White, William P Alabama 

Wilson, John E Alabama 

Wogan, Phillip Louisiana 

Wulff, Donald.... Alabama 

Zieman, John A Alabama 



INDEX 

GENERAL CATALOGUE 

Page 

Administration 15 

Admission * 21 

Alumni Associations 98 

Attendance 15 

Calendar .... 3 

Certificates In Education 67, 68 and 69 

Class Roll 102 

Credentials 21 

Curriculum 9 

Degrees 25 and 60 

Degrees With a Major In Education 70, 72, 74, and 77 

Discipline 16 

Examinations , 16 

Expenses 18 

General Information 6 

Grounds, and Buildings 7, 8 and 60 

Historical Statement 6 and 66 

Location 6 

Objectives 59 

Officers of Instruction and Administration 4 and 5 

Prizes 100 

Register of Students... 106 

Remarks on Regular Courses 33 

Requirements for Graduation 25 

Schedule for Regular Courses 28, 29 and 61 

Student Organizations 94 

Special Students 23 

Subject in Courses 36, 61 and 80 

Systems of Education 10 

Testimonials 21 

Transcript of Record.... 17 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Catalogue 1934-1935 




A College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, founded in 1830. 
Chartered as a college by the Legislature of Alabama in 
1836; empowered by Pope Gregory XVI to grant degrees 
in philosophy and theology in 1840 ; member of the South- 
ern Association of Colleges, the Association of American 
Colleges, and of the Association of Alabama Colleges. 

Corporate title: "The President and Trustees of the 
Spring Hill College, in the County of Mobile, Alabama." 



Spring Hill, Mobile County, Alabama 
March, 1934 



TRUSTEES OF SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



VERY REV. JOHN J. DRUHAN, S. J., Chairman 

REV. EDGAR J. BERNARD, S. J., Secretary 

REV. GEORGE G. McHARDY, S. J., Treasurer 

REV. ANDREW C. SMITH, S. J. 

REV. JAMES F. WHELAN, S. J. 



THE SPRING HILL COLLEGE FOUNDATION 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



VERY REV. JOHN J. DRUHAN, S. J., Chairman 

REV. GEORGE G. McHARDY, S. J. 

THOMAS M. STEVENS, LL. D. 

J. M. WALSH 

MATTHIAS M. MAHORNER, A. M., LL. B., LL. D. 

DAVID R. DUNLAP 

VERY REV. JOSEPH M. WALSH, S. J. 



College Calendar 



Sept. 


lO- 


Sept. 


ll- 


Nov. 


1- 


Nov. 


29- 


Dec. 


8- 


Dec. 


22 


1935 


Jan. 


7- 


Feb. 


1 


Feb. 


19- 


Mar. 


4-5- 


Mar 


19- 


Apr. 


17- 


Apr. 


23- 


May 


26- 


May 


28- 


May 


31- 



Registration 

All classes meet 

Feast of All Saints 

Thanksgiving Day 

Feast of the Immaculate Conception 

Christmas recess begins 

All classes resume 

Second Semester begins 

Annual retreat begins 

Shrovetide holidays 

Feast of St. Joseph, Patron of the College 

Easter recess begins 

All classes resume 

Convocation Sunday: Baccalaureate sermon 

Commencement Exercises 

Second Semester ends. 



Officers of Administration 



REV. JOHN J. DRUHAN, S. J., President 

REV. ANDREW C. SMITH, S. J., Dean 

REV. THOMAS J. SHIELDS, S. J., Prefect of Discipline 

REV. EDGAR J. BERNARD, S. J., Secretary 

REV. GEORGE G. McHARDY, S. J., Treasurer 

REV. EDWARD T. CASSIDY, S. J., Dean of Men 

LOUIS J. BOUDUOUSQUIE, B. S., Registrar 



Officers of Instruction 



REV. JOSEPH B. BASSICH, S. J., Professor of Education and Head 
of the Department. 

LOUIS J. BOUDOUSQUIE, B. S., Professor of Drawing and Mathe- 
matics. 

HARRY L. CRANE, S. J., Professor of History and Director of the 
Publicity Department. 

REV. DANIEL M. CRONIN S. J., Professor of Mathematics. 

REV. EDWARD CUMMINGS, S. J., Professor of Classics; Library 

Counsellor. 

REV. JOHN DEIGNAN, S. J., Professor of Chemistry and Head of 

the Department. 

MICHAEL J. DONAHUE, A. B., Professor of Economics and Educa- 
tion, Director of Athletics. 

RICHARD J. DUCOTE, A. B., B. S., Professor of Economics and 
Finance. Assistant Director of Athletics. 

KERMIT T. HART, B. S. B. A., Head of the Department of Com- 
merce. Professor of Accounting and Finance. 



Officers of Instruction 



REV. GEORGE ALVIN HAYES, S. J., Professor of Chemistry. 

REV. JOHN HUTCHINS, S. J., Professor of French. 

REV. FRANCIS JANS SEN, S. J., Professor of German, Latin, and 

Greek. 

MARIE YVONNE JAUBERT, A. B., M. A., B. L. S., Librarian. 

REV. MICHAEL KENNY, S. J., Professor of Philosophy. 

E. CECIL LANG, S. J., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

REV. WILLIAM A. MULHERIN, S. J., Professor of Philosophy, and 
Philosophy of Religion. 

REV. WILLIAM OBERING, S. J., Professor of Ethics and Sociology, 
and Head of the Department. 

REV. CHARLES J. QUIRK, S. J., Professor of English, and Head 
of the Department. 

MURPHY W. ROSS, S. J., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

REV. THOMAS J. SHIELDS, S. J., Professor of English, Special 
Metaphysics; Faculty Director of Athletics. 

LOUIS P. TWOMEY, S. J., Assistant Professor of English, Public 
Speaking and Mathematics. 

REV. ANTHONY J. WESTLAND, S. J., Professor of Physics, and 
Head of the Department. Professor of Spanish. 

REV. PATRICK H. YANCEY, S. J., Professor of Biology, and Head of 
the Department. Professor of Spanish. 

NORBORNE R. CLARK, JR., A.B., A.M., M.D., Attending Physician. 
WILFRED LEATHERWOOD, Student Assistant in Spanish. 
PATRICK J. POTTS, Student Assistant in Shorthand. 
E. LEROY THOMPSON, Student Assistant in Accounting. 



General Statement 



Spring Hill College enjoys the distinction of being 
one of the first institutions of higher learning established 
in the South. It was founded in the year 1830 by the 
Rt. Rev. Michael Portier, D. D., the first Bishop of Mobile. 
In 1836, the Legislature of the State of Alabama incorpo- 
rated it, giving it all the rights and privileges of a 
university, and in the year 1840, the Sovereign Pontiff, 
Gregory XVI, empowered it to grant canonical degrees 
in philosophy and theology. In 1847 the management of 
the College was entrusted to the Society of Jesus, whose 
members have since endeavored to make it a center of 
liberal culture. Spring Hill College was admitted to 
membership in the Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools of the Southern States in 1922. Without inter- 
ruption, the work of the College has continued for more 
than a century. The year 1930 witnessed the celebration 
of its one hundredth anniversary. 

Spring Hill College is picturesquely situated on an 
elevation two hundred feet above the sea level in Mobile's 
most beautiful residential district. The natural beauty of 
its site adorned with an almost endless variety of trees 
and shrubs and flowers, its artificial lake, its shaded ave- 
nues and the striking setting of its athletic fields and of 
its buildings, make the Spring Hill campus one of the 
most attractive college sites in the United States. 

Owing to its altitude and to the invigorating influ- 
ence of its resinous pines upon the surrounding atmos- 
phere, Spring Hill holds one of the best records for health 
in the country. In fact, very eminent physicians, well 
acquainted with our American colleges, have declared it 
pre-eminently desirable for students on account of its 
climatic advantages and perfect hygienic arrangements. 
The records of the United States Weather Bureau of 
Mobile show that for a period of fifty years there is an 
average of only ninety-five cloudy days a year; and most 



CATALOGUE 



of these were only partly cloudy. Besides, the temper- 
ature is most equable ; figures for the school year during 
the last ten years showing that the City of Mobile enjoys 
an average of 62.7 degrees. Outdoor exercise continues 
uninterruptedly from the beginning of the school year to 
the end. 

Spring Hill College at present offers four years of 
undergraduate study, leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Com- 
merce and four year courses in Education leading to 
teacher's certificates. Two-year courses are given in 
Engineering, Pre-Dental, Pre-Legal, and Pre-Medical 
work. In the light of the findings of the Association of 
the American Medical Colleges, the faculty advise stu- 
dents preparing for the study of medicine to take a Pre- 
Medical course of three years. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

Spring Hill College has extensive acreage, which af- 
fords ample room for buildings and athletic fields. The 
group of buildings consists of the Main Building, Mobile 
Hall, Yenni Hall, the Infirmary, the Chapel, the Thomas 
Byrne Memorial Library, and the Recreation Hall. 

THE MAIN BUILDING was erected in 1869, and is 
a substantial brick structure, several hundred feet in 
length and three stories high. The central part is occu- 
pied by the Faculty and the Administrative offices. From 
the third gallery of this building one may get a most 
beautiful view of the surrounding country, with its pine- 
clad hills, and the Bay of Mobile in the distance. 

MOBILE HALL, which was dedicated November 6. 
1927, is a splendid dormitory building, with rooms that 
leave nothing to be desired in the way of utility and com- 
fort. Each one is large and airy, and provided with its 
own clothes press, toilet and hot and cold shower. There 
is also a beautiful lounging room. 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



YENNI HALL, erected and named in memory of 
Rev. Dominic Yenni, S.J., Professor of Latin and Greek 
at Spring Hill for over fifty years, and author of Yenni's 
Latin and Greek Grammar, is entirely devoted to Science. 
Here are installed the Physics, Chemistry and Biology 
lecture rooms and laboratories, and the Seismographic 
Station, which is one of the few in the entire South. 

THE INFIRMARY BUILDING is separated from the 
other buildings, and is equipped to take care of all ordi- 
nary cases of illness. It is supplied with a complete phar- 
macy, and is under the direction of a physician of Mobile, 
who visits the College regularly. 

THE CHAPEL occupies the center of the architec- 
tural group, and is connected with the main building by 
concrete galleries. It is a stately Gothic structure and 
is generally considered the most perfect building of its 
kind in the South. 

THE THOMAS BYRNE MEMORIAL LIBRARY, a 
gift of Mrs. Thomas Byrne in memory of her husband and 
son, was completed in 1930. It has room for 150,000 
volumes. It contains a general reading room large enough 
to accommodate 200 students. There are moreover spe- 
cial rooms for research work and a large lecture room. A 
special section of the building contains the Lavretta 
library, donated by Mr. L. C. Lavretta, a Mobile Alumnus. 

THE RECREATION HALL is used as a recreation 
center. 

Spring Hill has several athletic fields, and ample 
space for more. One, in particular, is exceptionally fine. 
It is called Maxon Field, after a former coach of the 
College — a stretch divided in half by a beautiful avenue 
of aged Oaks, and surrounded by stately pines. A nine- 
hole golf course is maintained, affording an opportunity 
for those, who may be inclined to engage in this fascinat- 
ing sport. 



CATALOGUE 



CURRICULUM 

The purpose of Spring Hill College is to educate in 
the fullest sense, that is, to develop thoroughly and har- 
moniously the faculties of the whole man — intellectual, 
moral and physical. It assumes that on this harmonious 
development will depend the character of the students 
and the measure of their future utility to themselves and 
to the community ; and it aims to give that solid training 
of both mind and heart, which will make for this develop- 
ment and will fit the student for the just interpretation 
and use of life. 

In the intellectual training of its students, the insti- 
tution aims at laying a solid foundation in the elements 
of knowledge and at opening the mind to a generous 
share in the culture of life. For this reason the studies 
are chosen each for its distinct educational value and as 
a part in a complete and nicely adjusted system. The 
studies are so graded and classified as to be adapted to 
the mental growth of the student and to his orderly ac- 
quisition of knowledge. 

The courses leading to degrees embrace instruction 
in the departments of philosophy, sociology, language, 
literature, history, science and mathematics. The aim 
of these courses is to give the student a complete liberal 
education, which will train and develop all the powers of 
the mind, and will cultivate no one faculty to an exag- 
gerated degree at the expense of the others. The college 
ideal is not to foster specialization, but to cultivate the 
mind, to build thought and reasoning and that breadth of 
view which must ever be the foundation as well of more 
advanced scholarship, as of eminence in the professions 
or other stations of life. 

The two-year courses are designed for those students, 
who are unable to spend four years in a regular Arts or 
Science course. 



10 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

SYSTEM OF EDUCATION 

The officers and teachers in the College are for the 
most part members of the Jesuit order, an organization, 
which from its origin, has devoted itself to the education 
of youth. It conducts high schools, colleges and univer- 
sities throughout the United States, and has more than 
twenty-five thousand students in its various institutions. 

The principles of education, which have made the 
Jesuits successful in educational work throughout the 
world, and which are followed at Spring Hill, as in every 
Jesuit institution, are set forth in the Ratio Studiorum, a 
body of rules and suggestions outlined by the most prom- 
inent Jesuit educators in 1599, revised in 1832, and at- 
tended up to the present day with unfailing results. 

Truly psychological in its methods, and based upon 
the very nature of man's mental process, it secures on the 
one hand that stability so essential to educational thor- 
oughness, while on the other, it is elastic, and makes lib- 
eral allowances for the widely varying circumstances of 
time and place. While retaining, as far as possible, all 
that is unquestionably valuable in the older learning, it 
adopts and incorporates the best results of modern pro- 
gress. It is a noteworthy fact, however, that many of the 
recently devised methods of teaching, such as the Natu- 
ral, and Inductive and similar methods, are admittedly 
in reality mere revivals of devices recommended long 
ago in the Ratio Studiorunu* 

As understood by the Jesuits, education in its com- 
plete sense, is the full and harmonious development of 
all those faculties that are distinctive of man. It is more 
than mere instruction or the communication of knowl- 
edge. The acquirement of knowledge, though it neces- 
sarily pertains to any recognized system of education, is 



♦Those who are desirous of further information on the subject are referred 
to "Jesuit Education," by Robert Swickerath, S.J. (Herder, St. Louis, 1903), and 
to the numerous documents therein cited. 



CATALOGUE 11 



only a secondary result of Education itself. Learning is 
an instrument of education, which has for its end culture 
and mental and moral development. 

Consonant with this view of the purpose of educa- 
tion, it is clear that only such means should be chosen both 
in kind and amount, as will effectively further the purpose 
of education itself. A student cannot be forced, within 
the short period of his school course and with his imma- 
ture faculties, to study a multiplicity of the languages 
and sciences into which the vast world of knowledge has 
been scientifically divided. It is evident, therefore, that 
the purpose of the mental training given is not proximate- 
ly to fit the student for some special employment or 
profession, but to give him such a general, vigorous and 
rounded development, as well enable him to cope success- 
fully even with the unforeseen emergencies of life. While 
affording mental stability, it tends to remove the insular- 
ity of thought and want of mental elasticity, which is 
one of the most hopeless and disheartening results of 
specialization on the part of students, who have not 
brought to their studies the uniform mental training 
given by a systematic college course. These studies, there- 
fore, are so graded and classified as to be adapted to the 
mental growth of the student and to the scientific unfold- 
ing of knowledge. They are so chosen and communicated, 
that the student will gradually and harmoniously reach, 
as nearly as may be, that measure of culture of which he 
is capable. 

It is fundamental in the Jesuit system, that different 
studies have distinct educational values. Mathematics, 
the Natural Sciences, Language and History are comple- 
mentary instruments of education to which the doctrine 
of equivalents cannot be applied. The specific training 
given by one cannot be applied to another. The best 
educators of the present day are beginning to realize 
more fully than ever before, that prescribed curricula, 



12 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

embracing well chosen and co-ordinate studies, afford 
the student the most efficient means of mental cultiva- 
tion and development. This, however, does not prohibit 
the offering of more than one of such systematic courses, 
as for instance, the Classical and the Scientific, in view 
of the future career of the individual. While recogniz- 
ing the importance of Mathematics and the Natural 
Sciences, which unfold the interdependence and laws of 
the world of time and space, the Jesuit System of edu- 
cation has unwaveringly kept Language in a position of 
honor, as an instrument of culture. Mathematics and 
the Natural Sciences bring the student into contact with 
the material aspects of nature, and exercise the deductive 
and inductive powers of reason. Language and History 
effect a higher union. They are manifestations of spirit 
to spirit, and by their study and their acquirement, the 
whole mind of man is brought into widest and subtlest 
play. The acquisition of Languages especially calls for 
delicacy of judgment and fineness of perception, and for 
a constant, keen and quick use of the reasoning powers. 

Much stress is also laid on Mental and Moral philos- 
ophy, as well for the influence such study has in men- 
tal development, as for its power in steadying the judg- 
ment of the student in his outlook on the world and on 
life. Rational Philosophy, as a means of developing 
young manhood, is an instrument of strength and effec- 
tiveness. 

But to obtain these results, Philosophy must be such 
in reality, as well as in name. It must not content itself 
with vague groping after light, with teaching merely the 
history of Philosophy; detailing the vagaries of the 
human mind without venturing to condemn them; re- 
viewing the contradictory systems, which have held sway 
for a time, without any expression of opinion as to the 
fatal defects which caused them to be discarded. It must 
do more than this. It must present a logical, unified, com* 



CATALOGUE 13 



plete system of mind-culture in accord with the estab- 
lished laws of human thought; it must take its stand on 
some definite propositions expressive of truth; it must 
rise to the dignity of a science. With such a definite 
system to defend against attack, the mind becomes more 
acute and plastic, the logical powers are strengthened, 
the value of a proof is properly estimated, the vulner- 
able points of error are readily detected, and truth comes 
forth triumphant from every conflict of mind with mind. 

Finally, the Jesuit System does not share the delu- 
sion of those who seem to imagine that education under- 
stood, as an enriching and stimulating of the intellectual 
faculties, has of itself a morally elevating influence in 
human life. While conceding the effects of education in 
energizing and refining the student's imagination, taste, 
understanding and powers of observation, it has always 
held that knowledge and intellectual development of 
themselves have no moral efficacy. Religion alone can 
purify the heart and guide and strengthen the will. This 
being the case, the Jesuit System aims at developing side 
by side the moral and intellectual faculties of the stu- 
dent, and sending forth into the world men of sound 
judgment, of acute and rounded intellect, of upright and 
manly conscience. It maintains that, to be effective, 
morality is to be taught continuously ; it must be the un- 
derlying base, the vital force, supporting and animating 
the whole organic structure of education. It must suffuse 
with its light all that is read, illuminating what is noble 
and exposing what is base, giving to the true and false 
their relative light and shade. In a word, the purpose 
of Jesuit teaching is to lay a solid substructure in the 
whole mind and character for any superstructure of 
science, professional and special, as well as for the up- 
building of moral life, civil and religious. 



14 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

MORAL AND RELIGIOUS TRAINING 

In its moral and religious training, the college aims 
at building the conscience of its students for the right ful- 
filment of their civil, social and religious duties. There is 
insistence on the cultivation of the Christian virtues which 
operate for this fulfilment; and, as the only solid basis 
of virtue and morality, thorough instruction in the prin- 
ciples of religion forms an essential part of the system. 
Students of any denomination are admitted to the courses, 
and all are required to show a respectful demeanor dur- 
ing the ordinary exercises of public prayer. The Catholic 
students are required to attend the classes in Evidence of 
Religion, to be present at the chapel exercises, to make 
an annual retreat, and to approach the Sacraments at 
least once a month. 



CATALOGUE 15 



Administration 



SESSIONS 



The school year begins about the middle of Septem- 
ber and ends in the beginning of June. The year is di- 
vided into two semesters or sessions of eighteen weeks 
each. The first semester ends during the last week of 
January. The second begins immediately thereafter, 
without mid-year holidays. 

ATTENDANCE 

Every student is obliged to attend every lecture 
scheduled for his class, and all study periods, and unau- 
thorized absences, even from one class exercise, will de- 
prive him of the privileges of those who are in good 
standing, and lower his monthly mark in the subject 
treated during his absence. Credit for a course will be 
lost if the record for attendance is less than 85 per cent. 
In case of prolonged absence, due to illness or the like, 
this rule may be modified, but in any case all class work 
must be satisfactorily made up. 

Attendance is counted from the day of registration, 
and continues until the last exercise of each semester. 
Hence it is important that parents see that their boys 
report at school on the appointed day and remain until 
school closes at the end of each semester. Leave of ab- 
sence during the term, and permission to leave in advance 
of the appointed day for the Christmas holidays or for 
the summer vacation, should not be asked by parents, 
and will not be granted except for very serious reasons. 

Tardiness in class attendance is regarded as a par- 
tial absence, and three tardy marks will be recorded as 
one absence. 



16 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

DISCIPLINE 

THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM employed by the 
College includes, as one of its most important features, 
the formation of character. For this reason, the disci- 
pline, while considerate, is unflinchingly firm, especially 
when the good of the student body and the reputation of 
the institution are concerned. 

While it is the policy of the faculty to trust as much 
as possible to the honor of the students themselves, in 
carrying on the government of the college, nevertheless, 
for the maintaining of order and discipline, without} 
which the desired results are not attainable, regular and 
punctual attendance, obedience to college regulations, 
serious application to study and blameless conduct will 
be insisted upon; and honor, fair-dealing, self-restraint 
and fortitude will be demanded as the natural and nec- 
essary virtues of genuine character. Any serious breach 
of college discipline, repeated violation of regulations, 
neglect of studies, the possession or use of intoxicating 
liquors, and other offenses against morals or discipline 
which, in the judgment of the faculty, reflect on the good 
name of the college, render the offender liable to dis- 
missal. 

The college reserves the right to dismiss at any time 
a student who fails to give satisfactory evidence of ear- 
nestness of purpose and of interest in the serious work of 
college life. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Examinations in all subjects are held at the end of 
each semester. Besides, there are written monthly tests. 
The semester examination, together with the average of 
the months preceding, determine the standing of a pupil 
for the semester. The results of all examinations 
and tests are mailed to parents and guardians. If a pupil, 
on account of sickness or any other cause, misses a month- 



CATALOGUE 17 



ly test or an examination in any subject, he will be re- 
quired to make it up. In such cases, however, the re- 
sponsibility rests with the student, and his record will 
show zero until such test or examination is taken. 

Seventy percent is required for passing in each sub- 
ject. Conditions may be incurred by failure to satisfy the 
requirements of any course, which requirements include 
the recitations, tests, and other assigned work, as well 
as the examinations. A condition due, either to failure in 
a monthly test or in a semester examination, may be re- 
moved by a supplementary test or examination. The 
supplementary tests may be taken at the convenience of 
the professor. The supplementary examinations are 
held, upon recommendation of the department concerned 
and with the approval of the dean of the college, during 
the first month of the succeeding semester. They may 
be taken only on the days specified, and may not be de- 
ferred, except with the express consent of the dean. For 
each subject a fee is charged, payable in advance to the 
treasurer of the college. Removal of conditions by ex- 
aminations shall not entitle the student to a grade higher 
than seventy per cent. 

A student may take only one examination to remove 
a condition. If he fails to pass the subject, in both the 
regular and supplementary examination, he must repeat 
the entire subject in class. 

A condition due to failure to complete assigned work 
may be removed by making up the required work. 

TRANSCRIPT OF RECORD 

Students wishing transcript of records in order to 
transfer from this College to another, or for any other 
purpose, should make early and seasonable application 
for the same. No such statements will be made out dur- 



18 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



ing the busy periods of examination and registration, 
September 10 to 25, January 25 to February 5, and June 
1 to 15. One transcript of record is furnished free. One 
dollar is charged for additional copies. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

THE SCHOLASTIC YEAR is divided into two semes- 
ters. The first semester begins about the second week of 
September; the second, in the last week of January. 

EXPENSES 
General 

The general expenses of the student are grouped 
under the BASIC FEE. The basic fee varies with room 
and building accommodations selected by the student or 
his parents. It includes the cost of tuition, board, lodging 
and laundry, as well as the medical, athletic, and library 
fees. 

These expenses are payable in advance in semi-an- 
nual installment as follows : one-half the elected basic fee 
on the opening of school in September, and one-half on 
February 1st. All special fees (see below) are likewise 
payable in advance in semi-annual installments. 

A. For Resident Students (per semester) . 

Quinlan Hall (basic fee) $225.00 and $250.00 

Mobile Hall (basic fee) $275.00, $300.00, and $325.00 

A matriculation fee of $10.00 and a deposit of $10.00 
for room and reservation must accompany each applica- 
tion for entrance. 

A deposit of $50.00 (per semester) is required for 
resident students to cover the cost of books and incidentals 
and to provide for spending money. 

B. For Day Students (per semester). 

Tuition $62.50 

Athletic and Library Fees 15.00 

The above are fixed charges for every student. 



CATALOGUE 19 



Special Fees (per year). 

Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Laboratory, each $15.00 

Breakage (in Chemistry Courses only) 5.00 

Accounting Laboratory 10.00 

Special Courses in Accountancy - 2.00 

Stenography and Typewriting, each 20.00 

Surveying 5.00 

Drawing, if not in course 25.00 

Conditional Examination, on days assigned 1.00 

Conditional Examination, on other than assigned 

days 2.00 

Special Examination 5.00 

Graduation, final year only 15.00 

Duplicate Transcript of Record 1.00 

Medical Fee for Day Students 10.00 

Golf Fee 10.00 

Single Room 50.00 

ROOM RESERVATION 

The deposit of $10.00 for reservation of room is not 
returned in case of failure to occupy the room. 

This deposit is not applied to room rent but is kept 
to cover any damage beyond reasonable wear which may 
be done to the room or its furnishings while occupied by 
the students. The balance is returned to the parents at 
the end of the year. 

Rooms are equipped with shower bath and toilet, and 
are supplied with hot and cold water and all necessary 
heavy furnishings. Students supply their own toilet linen, 
rugs and whatever decorations are appropriate. 

TREASURER'S REGULATIONS 

All bills are payable in advance at the beginning of 
each semester, namely, in September and February. All 
checks should be made payable to Spring Hill College and 
addressed directly to the Treasurer. 



20 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

A refund will be allowed only in case of serious sick- 
ness, necessitating absence from the College for a period 
of a month and this only for board and lodging. As all 
contracts are made for semesters and not for shorter pe- 
riods, late attendance, dismissal and withdrawal are mat- 
ters of serious inconvenience to the college. 

No money will ever be advanced for any purpose 
whatever by the Treasurer unless a sufficient initial de- 
posit has been made with him by the parents of the stu- 
dent. When parents desire the college to pay for cloth- 
ing, traveling, dental care, etc., they should make arrange- 
ments in advance with the Treasurer. 

Day students who have not paid the Medical Fee of 
$10.00 are not entitled to the services of tKe staff physi- 
cian. The medical fee includes attention by the staff phy- 
sician and ordinary nursing for a limited period. Special 
operations and hospital services are not covered by this 
fee. 

Books and and stationery may be purchased at the 
college book store. 

The college will not be responsible for books, cloth- 
ing, jewelry or any other articles possessed by the students 
while in school or left by him at his departure. 

No student will be admitted to examinations or 
granted a degree until all indebtedness to the college is 
settled. 



CATALOGUE 21 



Admission 



PREPARATION 

Academic preparation, as secured by the completion 
of four years of a standard high school is essential to a 
student who wishes to enter college. Inquiry into the 
causes of failure in college classes makes it but too appar- 
ent that the chief of these causes is lack of preparation ; 
and many applicants, who have had good school oppor- 
tunities, are found to be particularly deficient in their 
knowledge of preparatory mathematics and in their abil- 
ity to use the English language. A thorough working 
knowledge, therefore, of the preparatory subjects is ab- 
solutely necessary in order to begin and carry on success- 
fully the prescribed work of the college, and it is mani- 
festly unfair to the applicant himself to admit him to 
college unless he has had sufficient preparation. The 
college classes begin where the preparatory work of the 
high school leaves off, and there is no opportunity after 
entering college to make up those deficiencies which a 
student may have incurred in his preparation. 

TESTIMONIALS 

All applicants for admission must present satisfac- 
tory testimonials of good moral character. 

CREDENTIALS 

The college requires for admission the satisfactory 
completion of a four-year course in a secondary school 
approved by a recognized accrediting agency or the 
equivalent of such a course. The major portion of the 
secondary school course, presented by a student for ad- 
mission, should be definitely correlated with the curricu- 
lum to which he seeks admission; in other words, all can- 
didates for admission to Freshman year must present 
fifteen units in acceptable subjects. A unit represents a 
year's study in any subject, constituting approximately 



22 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

a quarter of a full year's work. This definition of a unit 
takes the four-year high school as a basis and assumes 
that the length of the school year is from thirty-six to 
forty weeks, that a period is from forty-five to sixty min- 
utes in length, and that the study is pursued for four or 
five periods a week. 

No student will be admitted except on presentation 
of an official transcript of credits from the high school 
last attended. Credentials which are accepted for admis- 
sion become the property of the college. 

METHODS OF ADMISSION 

Candidates are admitted either on certificate or by 
examination. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

Admission by certificate is granted applicants from 
all schools on the approved list of the Commission on 
Accredited Schools of the Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools of the Southern States and of other 
recognized accrediting agencies outside the territory em- 
braced by the Southern Association. 

Blank forms of entrance certificates, which are to 
be used in every case, may be had on application to the 
Registrar. Certificates must be made out and signed by 
the Principal or other recognized officer of the school, 
and mailed by him directly to the Registrar. It is ex- 
pected that the Principal will not recommend all grad- 
uates, but only those whose ability, application and schol- 
arship are such that the school is willing to stand sponsor 
for their success in college. 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

Applicants who are not entitled to admission by cer- 
tificate must take examinations in the required entrance 
units. These examinations are held during the week pre- 
ceding the opening of classes. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students applying for admission from standard in- 
stitutions of collegiate rank will be given advanced stand- 
ing provided the credits of the institution are acceptable 



CATALOGUE 23 



and sufficient to be considered equivalent to the work 
done in the corresponding classes at Spring Hill. 

Such candidates should present in advance of regis- 
tration : 

1. A certificate of honorable dismissal from the 
school last attended. 

2. An official transcript of college credits, with 
specifications of courses, year when taken, hours and 
grades. 

3. An official certified statement of college en- 
trance credits, showing the length of each course in 
weeks the number of recitations and laboratory exercises 
each week, the length of recitation periods, and the 
mark earned. 

No student will be admitted to the college as a can- 
didate for a degree after the first semester of the Senior 
year. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Mature and earnest students, who either are lacking 
in the required units or wish to pursue particular studies 
without reference to graduation, may be admitted by the 
permission of the dean to such course of their own choice 
as they seem qualified to take. The work done by these 
students cannot be counted later on toward a degree at 
Spring Hill unless all entrance requirements have been 
satisfied. 

PRESCRIBED UNITS FOR REGULAR COURSES 

FOR THE A. B. COURSE 

English 3 units Greeks or Mod. Lang.... 2 units 

Mathematics* 3 units History 1 unit 

Latin 4 units Science 1 unit 

FOR THE B. S. COURSE 

English 3 units History 1 unit 

Mathematics 3 units Science 1 unit 

Foreign Language 2 units 

FOR THE B. S. IN COMMERCE COURSE 

English 3 units One foreign language.. 2 units 

Mathematics 2Y2 units Bookkeeping 1 unit 

History 1 unit 

1 Arithmetic not accepted. 

2 Provisions made for those who have not the prescribed units in Greek. 



24 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

The remaining units may be selected from subjects 
counted toward graduation in an accredited or recog- 
nized high school, with the following restrictions: 

1. No subject may be presented for less than a half 
unit of credit. 

2. Not more than one unit, counted towards grad- 
uation by an accredited high school, will be accepted in 
a vocational or commercial subject. 



CATALOGUE 25 



Degrees 



The College confers the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Science in Com- 
merce, following the satisfactory completion of the four- 
year courses enjoined by the Faculty on the candidates 
for these degrees. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

(a) AMOUNT OF WORK 

In order to receive a degree, a student is required to complete 
one hundred and twenty-eight semester hours of work and to main- 
tain a minimum grade of 70. 

The requirements for graduation include: 

1. A certain amount of prescribed work, especially during the 
Freshman and Sophomore years. 

2. A major and minor, to be taken chiefly during the Junior 
and Senior years. 

3. Approved electives, which afford opportunity for broader 
culture or for greater specialization, as the student may choose. 

4. At least the Senior year in residence at Spring Hill College. 

5. A written thesis approved by the dean of the college and 
presented on or before February 1 of the year in which the degree is 
expected to be conferred. 

6. All work in order to be accepted in fulfilment of any re- 
quirement for the degree must be completed with grade 70-80 or 
over. 

7. At the end of his four years, the student must pass a com- 
prehensive examination on the various courses offered as major and 
first minor. This requirement will be enforced for all students who 
registered in or after September, 1933. 

8. A fee of fifteen dollars, payable in advance. 

9. A settlement of all indebtedness to the College. 

All applicants for degrees should file their application and pre- 
sent all their credits on or before the first of April. 

The semester hour is the unit or standard for computing the 
amount of a student's work. A semester hour is defined as one lec- 
ture, recitation or class exercise, one hour in length per week, for 
one semester. Two hours of laboratory work are equivalent to one 
recitation hour. Two hours of preparation on the part of the stu- 
dent is required for each hour of lecture or recitation. 

The normal load is sixteen semester hours plus two in religion. 
Where specific combinations require it, work amounting to seventeen 



26 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

semester hours plus two in religion will be permitted. A load of eight- 
een semester hours plus two in religion is the maximum, and no 
student who has failed in any course at Spring Hill College will be 
allowed to carry the maximum load. Credit for the courses in "Relig- 
ion or Philosophy of Religion is obligatory and requisite for gradu- 
ation. 

(b) QUALITY OF WORK 

The average of the monthly written tests counts for one half 
of the semester grade and the semester examination the other half. 

Credits are not given for average grades, but only when every 
test and examination has 70 for a minimum. 

The percentage system is used in giving grades, 70 per cent 
being required for passing. In addition to Quantity credits, which 
are given upon completing the courses with a grade of 70 per cent 
or more, Quality points are allowed according to the quality of work 
done. A grade of 75 to 84 gives the student one Quality credit for 
each Quantity credit; a grade of 85 to 94 gives him two Quality 
credits for each Quantity credit; and a grade of 95 to 100 gives 
him three Quality credits for each Quantity credit. Quality credits 
are computed from the year-grade of the student. 

These grades are not given out to the students by the prof essors f 
but are regularly issued from the office of the dean of the college. 

Candidates for degrees must attend any course of lectures or 
any other exercises, that have been or may be equipped and required 
by the faculty, even though such courses receive no value in credits. 

MAJOR AND MINOR SEQUENCE 

There must be completed a Major Sequence of at least twenty- 
four hours in some subject (or at the discretion of the professor 
concerned and with the approval of the dean, in some closely related 
group of subjects) and a Minor Sequence of at least eighteen hours. 

A major may be changed only by the consent of the Dean and 
the heads of the departments concerned, and such change will be 
permitted only upon the distinct understanding that all the courses 
prescribed in the major finally chosen shall be completed befort 
graduation. 

ELECTIVES 

Courses (a) not taken as prescribed courses, and (b) not in- 
cluded in the student's major and minor may be chosen as approved 
electives to complete the 128 credits required for graduation. 



CATALOGUE 27 



In the choice of electives, each student must be guided by his 
prospective future work. He must ascertain, moreover, that such 
courses are open to his class; that he has fulfilled the prerequisites, 
and that there will be no conflict in the schedule of recitations or 
laboratory periods. 

Students, who offer French or Spanish as an entrance require- 
ment, will not receive credit toward graduation for French I or 
Spanish I, taken in college. 

Electives for the second term must be filed by members of 
the upper classes with the dean on or before January 5, and for the 
first term on or before May 15. 



REFERENCE STUDY AND RESEARCH 

1. Students taking courses in Philosophy shall prepare and 
submit each month a paper of 2,000 words dealing with the devel- 
opment of some specific topic of the subject-matter treated in class. 

2. Students taking courses in Education, History and Social 
Sciences will be required to hand in two papers each semester. 
These papers are to contain not less than 1,800 words, and are to be 
based on the student's outside reading. 



28 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Schedule of A. B. Course 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek or Mod. Lang... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek or Mod. Lang... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester* — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek or Mod. Lang... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Introd. to Phil 3 hours 



Second Semester — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek or Mod. Lang... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 



JUNIOR 



First Semester — 

History 3 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Approved Electives ..10 hours 



Second Semester — 

History 3 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Approved Electives ..10 hours 



First Semester — 
Philosophy 

Approved Electives ... 



SENIOR 

Second Semester — 

6 hours Philosophy 6 hours 

9 hours Approved Electives .... 8 hours 



CATALOGUE 



Schedule of B. S. Course 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester- 
English 8 houra 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Drawing 2 hours 



Second Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Drawing 2 hours 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester — 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Introd. to Phil 3 hours 



Second Semester — 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 4 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 



JUNIOR 



First Semester — 

History 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Approved Electives .... 6 hours 



Second Semester — 

History 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Approved Electives .... 6 hours 



SENIOR 



First Semester — 

Science 4 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Approved Electives .... 8 hours 



Second Semester — 

Science 4 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Approved Electives .... 7 hours 



so 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING COURSE 



First Semester — 

Mathematics 

Language 

Chemistry 

Drawing 

English 

Public Speaking 

First Semester — 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Descriptive Geometry 

English 

Language 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester — 

3 hours Mathematics 3 hours 

3 hours Language 3 hours 

4 hours Chemistry 4 hours 

4 hours Drawing 2 hours 

Descriptive Geometry.. 2 hours 

3 hours English 3 hours 

1 hour Public Speaking 1 hour 

SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester — 

4 hours Mathematics 4 hours 

4 hours Physics 4 hours 

4 hours Drawing 4 hours 

3 hours English 3 hours 

3 hours Language 3 hours 



SCHEDULE OF PRE-LEGAL COURSE 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester — 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Law Latin 3 hours 

Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

English „ 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Law Latin 3 hours 

Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



First Semester — 

History 3 hours 

Language 3 hours 

Introd. to Phil 3 hours 

Sociology 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester — 
History 3 hours 



Language 3 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Sociology 3 hours 

English 3 hours 



CATALOGUE 



81 



Schedule of Pre-Medical Courses 

Two- Year Pre-Medical Course 

FIRST YEAR 



First Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry .. 4 hours 

♦Modern Language .... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking; 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry .. 4 hours 

♦Modern Language .... 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



SECOND YEAR 



First Semester — 
Comparative Anatomy 4 hours 
Organic Chemistry .... 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Physics 4 hours 

♦Modern Language .... 3 hours 



Second Semester — 

Quantitative Chem. .. 4 hours 

Organic Chemistry .... 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Physics 4 hours 

♦Modern Language .... 3 hours 



Three- Year Pre-Medical Course 

FIRST and SECOND YEARS same as TWO-YEAR PRE-MEDICAL 

COURSE 



THIRD YEAR 



First Semester — 

Genetics 2 hours 

Physical Chemistry .... 4 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

History 3 hours 

Mathematics 4 hours 

Electives 2 hours 



Second Semester — 
Embryology 4 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

History 3 hours 

Mathematics 4 hours 

Electives 2 hours 



B. S. in Biology 

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology may be obtained 
by completing the requirements for a major in this subject and the 
additional hours to make up the necessary 128. The following 
courses will be offered for this purpose. 

♦Only French or German will be accepted for the B. S. in 
Biology. 



32 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



FOURTH YEAR 



First Semester — 

Histology 4 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Sociology 3 hours 

Electives 6 hours 



Second Semester — 
Introd. to General 

Physiology 4 nours 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Sociology 3 hours 

Electives 6 hours 



Schedule of 
Pre-Dental Course 



First Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry .. 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mod. Language 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry .. 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Mod. Language 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Dental Schools accept High School Physics for credit. In this 
case a modern language may usefully be substituted for it in college. 



CATALOGUE 33 



Remarks on Regular Courses 

The A.B. Course. 

This course is unexcelled as a preparation for a profession and 
for general culture. By a proper choice of electives, a student 
may include in his schedule Pre-Legal, Pre-Medical or Engineering 
studies, and thus be able to obtain his A. B. Degree with all the 
requirements for entrance into a professional school in four years. 

The B.S. Course. 

The object of this course is to prepare students for a career 
in some technical profession. Those who finish this course are 
entitled to advanced standing in the university courses, and thus 
they are enabled to obtain their B.S. Degree and make their pro- 
fessional studies in the least possible time. Students in this course 
may cover all the Pre-Medical or Pre-Legal requirements. In the 
B. S. course more time is devoted to Sciences, and Modern Lan- 
guages take the place of the Classics. 

The B. S. in Commerce Course. 

This course is designed to meet the demands of those who 
wish to combine a cultural education with the technical courses 
required for a business career. It embraces such subjects as Ac- 
counting, Commercial Law, Economics, Banking, Marketing, Pro- 
duction, Finance, English, Mathematics, and Modern Language, 
but also affords an opportunity for courses in History and Schol- 
astic Philosophy. 

A two-year course in business subjects will be arranged for 
those who do not wish to take the four-year course. 

The Engineering Course. 

This course is practically the same as the first two years of 
the B.S. course. It embraces the subjects that are generally 
required as the foundation of all technical engineering courses. 

The Pre-Legal Course. 

The best preparation for entering upon the study of law is 
a four-year course leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science. However, those wishing to take a two-year 
course, which will afterward be counted toward a degree, should 
communicate with the institution at which they intend to make 
their law studies to find out what it advises as a Pre-Legal course. 
In general, any two years of a standard course leading to degrees 
answer the purpose of a Pre-Legal course. 



34 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

The Pre-Medlical Course. 

Due to the large number of applicants for medical education in 
recent years and to the continual raising: of the standards by med- 
ical schools throughout the country, pre-medical students are strongly 
urged to take the full four years of college work in preparation for 
the study of medicine. With this in view a four-year course, leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Biology, has been worked 
out and is recommended for those who intend to study medicine. 
For those, who cannot spend this much time in undergraduate work, 
the first three years of the above course is admirably adapted to 
prepare them for a medical school. Finally, for those who are satis- 
fied to meet only the minimum requirements of some medical schools, 
the first two years of the same course is obligatory. 

With respect to this course the following excerpt from the 
annual report on "Medical Education in the United States" pre- 
pared by the Council on Medical Education and Hospitals (Jour. 
Amer. Med. Ass'n., Vol. 97 (9), p. 611, Aug. 29, 1931) will make 
plain what the minimum requirements for admission to the accept- 
able medical schools are: — 

"II. Pre-medical College Course. The minimum requirement 
for admission to acceptable medical schools, in addition to the high 
school work specified above ( a four-year course of at least fifteen 
units in a standard accredited high school or other institution of 
standard secondary school grade), will be sixty semester hours of 
collegiate work, exclusive of military and physical education, extend- 
ing through two years, of thirty-two weeks each, exclusive of holidays, 
in a college approved by the Council of Medical Education and Hos- 
pitals*. The subjects included in the two years of college work, 
should be in accordance with the following schedule. 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS OF THE TWO-YEAR PRE-MEDICAL 
COLLEGE COURSE 

Required Subjects: Semester Hours 

Chemistry (a) 12 

Physics (b) 8 

Biology (c) 8 

English Composition and Literature (d) 6 

Other Non-Science Subjects (e) 12 

Subjects Strongly Urged: 

A Modern Foreign Language (f) 6-12 

Advanced Botany or Advanced Zoology 3-6 

Psychology and Logic 3-6 

* Spring Hill College is so approved. Cf. J. A. M. A., 97, p. 612. 



CATALOGUE 35 



The usual introductory college course of six semester hours, 
or its equivalent, is required. 

Suggestions Regarding Individual Subjects: 

Advanced Mathematics, including Algebra and Trigonometry 3-6 

Additional Courses in Chemistry 3-6 

Other Suggested Electives: 
English| (additional), Economics, History, Sociology, Political 
Science, Mathematics, Latin, Greek, Drawing. 

(a) Chemistry. 

Twelve semester hours required, of which at least eight semes- 
ter hours must be in General Inorganic Chemistry, including four 
semester hours of laboratory work, and four semester hours in 
Organic Chemistry, including two semester hours of laboratory 
work. In the interpretation of this rule, work in qualitative analysis 
may be counted as General Inorganic Chemistry. 

(b) Physics. 

Eight semester hours required, of which at least two must be 
in laboratory work. It is urged that this course be preceded by a 
course in Trigonometry. 

(c) Biology. 

Eight semester hours required, of which four must consist of 
laboratory work. This requirement may be satisfied by a course of 
four semester hours each in Zoology and Botany, but not by Botany 
alone. 

(d) English Composition and Literature. 

(e) Non-Science Subjects. 

Of the sixty semester hours required as the measurement of 
two years of college work, at least eighteen, including the six semes- 
ter hours of English, should be in subjects other than the Physical, 
Chemical or Biological Sciences. 

(f) Foreign Language*. 

A reading knowledge of a modern foreign language is strongly 
urged. If the reading knowledge of this language is obtained on the 
basis of high school work, the student is urged to take another lan- 
guage in his college course. It is not considered advisable, however, 
to spend more than twelve of the required sixty semester hours on 
foreign languages. 

(g) In General. 

This Pre-Medical Course in both quantity and quality must be 
such as to make it acceptable as the equivalent of the first two 
years of the course in reputable, approved colleges of arts and 
science leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science." 

*Most medical schools specify French or German as the mod- 
ern foreign language required. 



36 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

SUBJECTS IN COURSE 

The Faculty reserves the right to refuse to offer a 
course listed below for which there is not a sufficient 
number of applicants. 

BIOLOGY 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. General Biology. 

An introductory course consisting of an outline of the physical 
structure and chemical composition of protoplasm and the cell, 
the morphology and physiology of plant and invertebrate animal 
types. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

Given every year. 

201. Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. 

A comparative study of type forms with special reference to 
Analogy and Homology. Prerequisite Biology 101-102. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
One semester. Four hours credit. 

Given in 1933-'34; to be given in 1934-'35. 

202. Genetics. 

A survey course of the facts and theories of heredity and vari- 
ation. Prerequisite Biology 101-102. 
Lectures two hours per week. 

One semester. Two hours credit. 

Given in 1933-'34; to be given in 1934- , 35. 

203. Vertebrate Embryology. 

A study of Gametogenesis, Fertilization, Cleavage, Gastrula- 
tion and Later Development of Typical Vertebrate Forms. 
Prerequisite Biology 101-102. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
One semester. Four hours credit. 

Given in 1932-'33; to be given in 1934. 

204. Microscopic Technique. 

A laboratory course in the Methods of Preparing Tissues for 



CATALOGUE 37 



Microscopical Study. Restricted to a few select students. Pre- 
requisite Biology 101-102, 202 or 203 and Chemistry 101-102. 

Four hours per week. Two hours credit. 

Given in 1932; to be given in 1934-'35. 

UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

These courses are intended primarily for students majoring in 
Biology and are open for credit ordinarily only to Juniors and 
Seniors. 

301. Histology. 

A study of cells and fundamental tissues. Prerequisites 
Biology 101-102, 202 or 203. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
One semester. Four hours credit. 

Given in 1933; to be given in 1935. 

302. Bacteriology. 

A course dealing with the morphology,, classification, physi- 
ology and cultivation of bacteria; the relation of bacteria to the 
health of man and animals; and the principles of immunity. Pre- 
requisites Biology 101-102 and Chemistry 101-102. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

401. Introduction To General Physiology. 

A study of matter and energy in relation to living things; solu- 
tions; diffusion and osmotic pressure; the physico-chemical struc- 
ture of protoplasm. Prerequisites Biology 101-102,201, 203; Chem- 
istry 101-2, 202, 301. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

Given in 1934; to be given in 1935. 

402. General Physiology. 

The fundamental life processes of organisms from a general 
and comparative viewpoint. Prerequisites Biology 401 and Chem- 
istry 203-4, 301, 305-6. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

To be given in 1936. 

403. History of Biology. 

A review of the principal figures, theories and discoveries which 



38 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

have contributed to the development of the science of biology. 
Prerequisite Biology 101-102. 

Lecture one hour per week. 

One semester. One hour credit. 

404. Introduction To Research. 

Special work for advanced students and preparation of thesis. 

Credit to be arranged. 

Mendel Club. 

This club is composed of the staff and students majoring in 
Biology, as well as others interested in the subject. The work of 
the club consists in the reading and discussion of papers on biological 
subjects by the members and invited lecturers. 

One hour per alternate week. 

Two semesters. 

CHEMISTRY 

101. General Inorganic Chemistry. 

This course is intended to familiarize the student with the fun- 
damental principles of chemical theory. The principles are devel- 
oped and driven home by illustrations, exercises and problems. 
Since the chemistry of the laboratory is the true chemistry, the 
whole course is arranged about it and is made to carry th© thread 
of the subject. Four hours credit. 

102. Elementary Qualitative Analysis. 

In this course an endeavor is made to impress upon the student 
the principles involved, and to enable him to classify chemical phe- 
nomena, avoiding mere thoughtless manipulation. Special emphasis 
is laid on the development of the ionic theory and theories of 
solution. Four hours credit. 

202. Quantitative Analysis. 

This course includes the elements of gravimetric and volumetric 
analysis with typical analytical methods. The laboratory work is 
supplemented by conferences and quizzes, the important principles 
of stoichiometry being especially emphasized. Four hours credit. 

203-4. Organic Chemistry. 

The principles of Organic Chemistry and its relation to Gen- 
eral Chemistry are emphasized. Typical organic compounds are 
studied, and their constitution is discussed at some length. General 
reactions and characteristics are discussed, and many applications 
of Organic Chemistry to practical life are given. 

Eight hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 39 






301. — Physical Chemistry. 

This course is intended to familiarize intending students of 
Medicine and Engineering with the fundamental principles of Chemical 
Theory. The structure of matter, thermodynamics and electrochem- 
istry, are treated as fully as possible. Laboratory work includes the 
different methods of molecular weight determination, electrical con- 
ductance and the determination of Hydrogen-ion concentration, 
colorimetrically and electrometrically. 

Four hours credit, 

302. Materials of Engineering Products. 

A brief course in the elements of qualitative analysis stressing 
analytical actions, separations and identifications in the light of 
modern theories of ionic solutions and equilibria. Analysis of iron, 
steel, certain alloys and commercial products are made with special 
determination of iron, lead, zinc and copper ores. 

Four hours credit. 

303-4. Material of Engineering Products. 

A brief course in the elements of quantitative analysis stressing 
gravimetric determinations of iron, sulphur and chlorine to enable 
the student to acquire speed, accuracy and confidence. Volumetric 
analysis is then taken up with emphasis being placed on commercial 
products and practical methods as determined in a modern industrial 
laboratory. Eight hours credit. 



305-6. — Physiological Chemistry. 

An elementary course dealing with the Chemistry of the Carbo- 
hydrates, fats and proteins. The chemical basis underlying the phe- 
nomena of metabolism; enzymes, absorption and digestion are dis- 
cussed. 

Eight hours credit. 

N. B. Chemistry 101, 102, 301, 202 are required of Engineering 
students. 

Chemistry 201, 302, 303 and 304 are recommended for Engi- 
neering students. 

Chemistry 101, 102, 203 and 204 are required of Pre-Medi- 
cal students. 

Chemistry 301 and 202 are recommended for Pre-Medical 
students and required by many medical schools. 



40 SPRING HILL COLLEG E 

DRAWING 

101-2. Mechanical Drawing. 

Lettering, tracing, blue-printing, geometrical construction, 
orthographic and oblique projection, exercises in drawing to scale, 
intersections and development of surfaces. Working drawings of 
machine parts and of complete machines and structures, dimension- 
ing, line-shading. One Semester and a half. Six hours credit. 

106-201. — Descriptive Geometry. 

A critical study of the science of drawing. The location of 
points, lines, planes; single-curved surfaces; surfaces of revolution 
and warped surfaces, with their relations to each other; tangent lines 
and planes; intersection of surfaces; shades and shadows. One se- 
mester and a half. Prerequisite, Solid Geometry. Six hours credit. 

205. Topographical Drawing. 
Shades and shadows, representation of surface forms by contours 
and by shading with pencil, pen and colors. Topographical symbols, 
copying, enlarging and reducing maps. Two hours credit. 

202. Machine Drawing. 

Free-hand and mechanical drawing of machine parts and com- 
plete machines, piping plans, etc., with problems in mechanism and 
in machine design. Four hours credit. 

103-4. Anatomical Drawing. 

An elective course for pre-medical students, calculated to im- 
print graphically upon the mind an accurate theoretical knowledge 
of the construction of the human body. The skeleton, nervous sys- 
tem and various organs form the basis of study. 

Four hours credit. 

204. Architectural Drawing. 

An elective course for those students anticipating the study of 
architecture to be taken the second Semester of the Sophomore 
year. 

The fundamental principles underlying architectural construc- 
tion, with special stress being laid upon orthographic details of 
moldings, balustrades, facades, doors, windows and domes. 

Three hours lecture per week. 

204-A. Architectural Drawing. 

A laboratory course for those students taking Drawing 204. 
Practical application of principles studied entailing the reproduction 
of the outstanding examples of ancient and modern architectural de- 
tails. Eight hours laboratory per week. 



CATALOGUE 41 



301. Architectural Design. 

A study of architectural models stressing the method of ren- 
dering and sketching in pencil and charcoal. 

Two hours lecture per week. 

301 -A. Architectural Design. 

Laboratory course in connection with Drawing 301. 

Six hours laboratory per week. 

302. Architectural Design. 

Study of the architecture of the Renaissance of Italy, France 
and England and early American architecture. 

Three hours lecture per week. 
302-A. Architecture Design. 
Laboratory course in connection with Drawing 302. 

ECONOMICS 

Courses as outlined under Department of Commerce. 

EDUCATION 

Courses as outlined under Department of Education. 

ENGLISH 
1. Rhetoric and Composition. 

A course in the essentials of rhetoric and in the various modes 
of composition. Required of Freshman students who are deficient 
in the theory or practice of correct English. 

101. Advanced Rhetoric. 

A course in the theory of rhetoric and the study of style based 
on reading, analysis and discussion of works of English prose au- 
thors. Insistence on the principles of literature and frequent prac- 
tice in composition. Required of Freshmen. 

Three hours credit. 

102-A. Poetry. 

A course in the study of the nature and elements of poetry, 
principles of versification, its various kinds, etc. Reading, analysis 
and appreciation of the chief poets, partly in class study, partly in 
assignments. Frequent practice in composition. Required of Fresh- 
wen. Three hours credit. 

102-B. Types of English Prose. 

A study of the chief forms of prose writing, narrative and ex- 
pository. Required readings in the short story and the essay with 
class discussions and frequent exercises in composition. 

Three hours credit. 

201. Oratory. 

The theory of oratory; analysis and study of oratorical mas- 
terpieces. The preparation of briefs, the composition and delivery 



42 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



of short addresses, speeches for occasions, debates, and at least two 
formal orations will be required. Required of Sophomore. 

Three hours credit. 

202. The Drama. 

The theory of the drama will be studied by means of lectures 
and assignments in its history and development; reading, analysis 
and study of works of principal English dramatists, especially 
Shakespeare; composition in dialogue, dramatic sketches, playlets, 
and at least one complete drama will be required. Required of 
Sophomore. Three hours credit. 

301. The English Novel. 

The principal purpose of this course is to study the technique 
of the novel and the various schools of fiction and their tendencies 
with special attention to their ethical and literary value. Reading 
and discussion of noted novels. Three hours credit. 

302. Shakespeare. 

Shakespeare's life, influence, sources of his drama; an acquain- 
tance by reading and assignments with the Shakespearean literature 
of criticism ; reading, analysis and study of Shakespeare's plays, 
especially in comparison with those of other dramatists. 

Three hours credit. 

303. Aesthetics and Literary Criticism. 

The philosophical basis of aesthetics, the elements of taste; the 
theory of criticism; a survey of critical standards; a study of the 
schools of criticism and of the work of the chief literary critics. 
Critical papers of assigned subjects will be required. 

Three hours credit. 

304. The Essay. 

The nature of the essay; the artistic and didactic types, and 
their various forms; the characteristics of each. An historical sur- 
vey of the essay with a brief study of the work of the chief essay- 
ists. Newman will receive special attention. Composition in the 
various forms of the essay will be required. 

Three hours credit. 

307. American Literature. From the beginning to 1800. This 
course includes a survey of the Colonial Time and the Revolution- 
ary Period. Attention will be specially given to the more important 
authors and their work, such as Mather, Jonathan Edwards, the 
Hartford Wits, Philip Freneau, and Charles Brockden Brown. Based 
on Cairn's History of American Literature. 

Three hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 43 



308. American Literature. From 1800 to the death of Walt 
Whitman. A course intended to give the student a clear grasp of 
this most interesting and important era in our national literature. 
Writers and their work discussed will include the following: Wash- 
ington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper, William Cullen Bryant, the 
Anthology Club, and the Transcendentalists. Based on Cairn's His- 
tory of American Literature. 

Three hours credit. 

309. English Literature. From Beowulf to 1500. A series of 
lectures on Old English and Middle English Literature. Among the 
authors studied will be such as Caedmon, Bede, Alfred the Great, 
Aelfric and Chaucer. Attention will be also directed to a study of 
the early ballads and lyrics. Based on James McCallum's The Be- 
ginnings to 1500. (Scribner's English Literature Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

310. English Literature. The Renaissance. The student will 
have an opportunity in this course to study such great writers as Sir 
Thomas Wyatt, Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, Sir Philip Sidney 
and Edmund Spenser. In this course the plays of Marlowe and 
Shakespeare will be especially stressed. Based on Robert Whitney 
Bolwell's, The Renaissance. (Scribner's English Literature Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

311. English Literature. The Seventeenth Century. This 
course will include a careful survey of the Puritan Age and that of the 
Restoration. Milton's Paradise Lost and Dryden's Hind and the 
Panther will be carefully studied and discussed. Based on Evert 
Mordecai Clark's The Seventeenth Century. (Scribner's English 
Literature Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

312. English Literature. The Eighteenth Century. In this 
course lectures will be given on Daniel Defoe, Addison and Steele, 
Alexander Pope and his circle, with a thorough study of the social 
and religious backgrounds of the period. Based on Joseph P. Blick- 
ensderfer's the Eighteenth Century. (Scribner's English Literature 
Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

401-2. Journalism. 

Ethics of journalism; a brief survey of the history of journal- 
ism, its development, and a discussion of its present tendencies. The 
technology of the pressroom, news gathering and reporting; prepara- 
tion of copy; copy-reading, proof-reading, interviewing and editing. 
Field work will be required and co-operation with the college period- 
icals. Six hours credit. 



44 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

FRENCH 

101. Elementary French. The rudiments of grammar, includ- 
ing the inflection of the regular and more common irregular verbs; 
the order of words in the sentence; colloquial exercises; easy themes; 
conversation. 

First semester. Three hours credit. 

202. Elementary French Continued.) Mastery of irregular 
verb forms; use of the conditional and subjunctive; syntax; colloquial 
exercises; themes; conversation; reading of graduated texts. 

Three hours credit. 

Texts: Xavier de Maistre's "Les Prisonniers du Caucase"; 
Chateaubriand's "Le Dernier Abencerage." 

201. Intermediate French. Grammar review, with special at- 
tention to problems in syntax; reading of graduated texts; conversa- 
tion; prose composition; letter writing; dictation, essays. Prerequi- 
site, French 1 and 2 or equivalents. Three hours credit. 

Texts: Paul Feval's "La Fee des Greves;" Maistre's La 
Jeune SiberienneJ" Halevy's "L'Abbe Constantin." 

202. Intermediate French (Continued). Reading of graduated 
texts; conversation; prose composition; letter writing; dictation; 
detailed written abstracts of texts read; essays. 

Three hours credit. 
Texts: Merimee's "Carmen"; Lamartine's "Scenes de la Revo- 
lution Francaise;" Loti's "Pecheur d'Islande;" Danemarie's "Le Secret 
de L'Etang Noir;" Gautier's "La Jettatura." 

301. Advanced French. Grammar review with special atten- 
tion to problems in syntax; reading of graduated texts; conversation; 
letter- writing; dictation; grammar and composition based on a French 
text; abstracts of texts read; essays. 

Three hours credit. 
Text: Moliere's "Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme," Corneille's "Le 
Cid," Chateaubriand's "Atala," Loti's 'Ramuntcho;" Merimee's 
"Colomba." 

302. Advanced French (Continued). Reading of graduated 
texts; conversation; letter writing; dictation; grammar and compo- 
sition based on a French text; abstracts of texts read; essays com- 
posed in French. Three hours credit. 

Text: Racine's "Esther;" A. de Musset's "Carmosine" and other 
dramas. Bazin's "Les Oberle;" Bordeaux's "La Peur de Vivre;" 
La Brette's "Aimer Quand Meme." 



CATALOGUE 46 



401. Modern French Poetry. Readings from Lamartine, Victor 
Hugo, Alfred de Musset, Alfred de Vigny, and others, with an intro- 
duction to French versification. 

Three hours credit. 

402. The French Drama. The reading of dramas chosen from 
such authors as Corneille, Moliere, Racine, together with a study 
of their lives and works. Three hours credit. 



GERMAN 

101. Elementary German. 

This course is intended for students who have not presented 
German for admission. Grammar, pronunciation, colloquial exer- 
cises, German prose composition, easy themes, translation from prose 
selections, word formation, simple conversational exercises in Ger- 
man. Reading aloud and hearing the language read. 

Three hours credit. 

102. Elementary German (Continued.) 

Weak and strong verbs, the use of the modal auxiliaries; the 
chief rules of syntax and word-order; selections in prose and verse; 
dictation based upon the readings; frequent short themes; conversa- 
tion. 

Three hours credit. 

201. Intermediate German. 

Rapid review of grammar; conversation; dictation; prose composi- 
tion. Study of representative German literary masterpieces. Read- 
ing of typical short-stories, portraying modern German life and 
ideals. Open to students who have credit for German 101 and 102, 
or who have presented elementary German for admission. 

Three hours credit. 

I i\i". \ I \ \ 1 \ \ V : 

202. Intermediate German (Continued.) 

General survey of German literature from its beginning to the 
present time. Reading of selected texts, and themes based upon the 
reading. 

Three hours credit. 

301. German Prose Writers. 

History of German literature, assigned readings and reports. 



46 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

The study of novels or short stories by German prose writers; Frey- 
tag, Novalis, Brentano, Eichendorff. 

Three hours credit. 

302. German Poetry. 

Readings from German ballads and lyrics. 

Three hours credit. 

401-2. The German Epic. 

Dreizehnlinden, Weber; Der Trumpeter von Sakkingen, Scheffel; 
selections from other epic poems. Six hours credit. 



GREEK 

1. For Beginners. 

Grammar and Composition. Xenophon, Anabasis, I. Required 
of those who do not offer Greek for entrance. 

Three hours a week for one semester. 

2. Xenophon. 

Anabasis, II-III; New Testament, St. Luke's Gospel; Grammar 
and Composition. Required of those who do not offer Greek for 
entrance. Three hours a week for one semester. 

101. Homer. 

The Iliad, I-IV, selections; or Odyssey, selections. Euripides. 
Iphigenia in Aulis, Medea, Hecuba; Aristophanes, Clouds. Sight 
reading; Xenophon, Cyropaedia. Grammar and composition based 
on Arnold. Three hours credit 

102. Homer. 

The Odyssey, selections; Theocritus, selections; Pindar, Olym- 
pic Odes, selected; sight reading, New Testament, selections. Gram- 
mar review and composition based on Arnold. 

Three hours credit. 

201. Demosthenes. 

On the Crown; selections from St. John Chrysostom and St. 
Basil; studies and oratorical analysis. Grammar review and com- 
position based on Arnold. Three hours credit. 

202. Demosthenes. Aeschylus. 

Demosthenes, Philippics or Olynthiacs; oratorical analysis; 



CATALOGUE 47 



Aeschylus ? Agammemnon. Grammar review and composition based 
on Arnold. Three hours credit. 

301. Plato. 

Crito, Phaedo. Apology. Three hours credit. 

302. Herodotus, Thucydides. 

Herodotus, selections from Books I-IV.; Thucydides, selections 
from the Sicilian expedition. Three hours credit. 

401. Sophocles. 

Antigone, Oedipus Tyrannus, Oedipus Coloneus. 

Three hours credit. 

402. Aristophanes. 

The Wasps, the Birds, the Frogs. Three hours credit. 



HISTORY 

101. Early Medieval History. 

Migration of Nations. The Islam, the Franks, the Lombards, 
and the Holy See. Church and State. The Carolingians. The 
Northmen in Europe. The Making of Germany and the Rrse of the 
Empire. Lay-Investiture. Three hours credit. 

102. The Middle Ages. 

The Crusaders. The Hohenstaufens. Invasion of the Mongols. 
Saint Louis. Life in the Middle Ages. Feudalism. England and 
France in the Middle Ages. The Exile of the Papacy. The Western 
Schism. The Hundred Years' War. The War of the Roses. Con- 
solidation of European Monarchies. Three hours credit. 

103. Backgrounds of Civilization (Introduction to History). 
The aim of this course is to orient the student so that he may 

view in its proper setting the status of the world today. That this 
may be done in a reasonable way, the contributory causes to the 
present intellectual, moral and religious culture are traced from their 
probable origins. In the same way the progressive stages of the 
world's economic and political development as recorded in history are 
followed from the remote past to the present actual situation. 

Three hours credit. 



48 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

104. Backgrounds of Civilization (Introduction to History) 
Continued. 

This course reviews the revolution in industry brought on by 
the machine age. It points out the sociological and economic prob- 
lems arising from the centralization of capital and mass production 
which followed in the wake of new discoveries in science and indus- 
trial machines. The new facilities in world communication and trans- 
portation are considered together with the complicated systems of 
distribution and finance which they connote. 

Three hours credit. 

201. Renaissance and Revolution. 

The Revival of Learning, of Art and Politics. Social Condi- 
tions. The Protestant Revolution in Germany, England and Scot- 
land. Catholic Revival. The Huguenot Wars in France. The Revolt 
of the Netherlands. The Thirty Years' War. The Puritan Revolu- 
tion. The Age of Louis XIV. The War of the Spanish Succession. 
The Church and the State. The Making of Russia. The Rise of Prus- 
sia. The Downfall of Poland. The French Revolution. Napoleon Bon- 
aparte. Three hours credit. 

202. Europe Since 1814. 

The Industrial Revolution. England and France in the Nine- 
teenth Century. The Unification of Germany. The Unification of 
Italy. The Social, Political and Religious Conditions in Europe. 
The Eastern Question. The Partition of Africa. The World War 
of 1914. Reconstruction after World War. 

Three hours credit. 

301. American History to the Reconstruction Period. 

This course, with the following^ aims to bring into relief the 
outstanding influences that have shaped the history of the United 
States from the Colonial Period to our own, stressing for this pur- 
pose topics of import for the social, economic and political develop- 
ment of the nation. First semester. 

Three hours credit. 

302. American History Since the Reconstruction Period. 

A similar course to the preceding, stressing in its latest phases 
the conditions and circumstances that led to America's participation 
in the Great War, with the resulting stimulus to a clearer national 
consciousness of the value and significance of American citizen- 
sn *P* Three hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 49 



401. History of the Latin American Countries. 

European Background. Early discoveries and settlements in 
the islands and on the mainland of North, Central and South Amer- 
ica. Civilization of the Natives. Spanish and Portuguese Colonial 
Systems. Contribution of the Jesuit and Franciscan Missionaries 
to Culture and Civilization. Abuses of the Spanish Government. The 
Struggles for Independence. History of Independent Mexico and 
Central American Countries after 1821. Economic, Social and Polit- 
ical Life. Three credit hours. 

402. History of Latin America (Continued). 

History of the Independent Countries of South America, Eco- 
nomic, Social and Political Life. The Monroe Doctrine. Signifi- 
cance and Influence. Relation of the Latin American Countries with 
One Another, the United States and the World. Pan Americanism. 
Latin America and the World War. Present Situation and Outlook. 

Three credit hours. 



LATIN 

1-2. Elementary Latin. 

General grammar with oral and written exercises. Caesar, De 
Bello Gallico I-IV. 

3. Cicero. 

In Catilinam I-III; Letters. Grammar and Composition. 

4. Virgil. 

Aeneid I- VI; Ovid, Metamorphoses XIII-XIV, Grammar and 
Composition. 

(Courses 1, 2, 3 and 4 are required of those students who do 
not offer sufficient Latin credits at entrance. These courses do not 
fulfil the requirement of College Latin.) 

101-2. Cicero. 

Pro Archia Poeta, Pro Ligario, Pro Milone; De Senectute, Som- 
nium Scipionis. Frequent composition based on Arnold. 

Six hours credit. 

201-2. Horace. 

Horace, selected Odes and Epodes. Frequent compositions based 
on Arnold. 

Six hours credit. 

301. Horace, Juvenal. 

Study of Roman Satire. 

Three hours credit. 



50 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

302. Tacitus, Sallust, Livy. 

Selections from the Roman historians; required reading: Taci- 
tus, Agricola or Germania; Sallust, Bellum Catilinarium; Livy, Books 
XXI-XXIV. Three hours credit. 

401. Plautus, Terence. 

Selected plays. Three hours credit. 

402. Pliny, Seneca. 

Pliny, selected letters of Pliny the Younger. Seneca, Moral 
Essays, selected letters. Three hours credit. 

403. Ecclesiastical Latin. 

Hymns and homilies selected. One hour credit. 

MATHEMATICS 

1. Advanced Algebra. 

A course for those who present but one unit of Algebra for 
entrance to college. The work starts with a review of Elementary 
Algebra, and then takes up such subjects as are usually given in a 
third semester high school course of Algebra. 

2. Geometry. 

A course on geometrical interpretations and applications to ge- 
ometry, for those who have not had Solid Geometry in high school. 
Cannot be counted in fulfilment of the requirements in Mathematics. 

101. College Algebra. 

After a brief review of the foundations, the following topics are 
treated: variables and limits, binomial theorem, series, logarithms, 
determinants, and theories of equation. PREREQUISITES: Algebra, 
one and one-half units; and Plane Geometry. 

Three hours credit. 

102. Plane Trigonometry. 

The six elementary functions for acute angles; goniometry; 
solution of right and oblique triangles; graphs of the functions and 
solution of simple trigonometric equations. Three hours credit. 

103. Spherical Trigonometry. 

The right spherical triangle. Napier's rules, formulas and 
methods for the solution of the general triangle. Open to students 
who have had Mathematics 102. Two hours credit. 

104. Surveying. 

The theory, use and adjustment of instruments, methods of 
computation and arrangement of data; practical field work and 
topographic map-making. Three hours credit. 

105-6 — Business Mathematics. Percentage; simple and com- 
pound interest; bank, trade and cash discounts; equation of accounts; 
mathematics of sinking funds, bond values, and asset valuation. 

Six hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 51 



201. Plane Analytic Geometry. 

Loci and their equations. The straight line; the circle; the 
parabola, ellipse, and hyperbola; transformation of co-ordinates; 
polar co-ordinates. Four hours credit. 

202. Solid Analytic Geometry. 

An introductory treatment of the point, plane, straight line, 
and surfaces of revolution. Three hours credit. 

204. Differential Calculus. 

Fundamental notions of variables; functions, limits, deriva- 
tives and differentials; differentiation of the ordinary algebraic, ex- 
ponential and trigonometric functions with geometric applications to 
minims, inflexions and envelopes; Taylor's formula. 

Four hours credit. 

301. Integral Calculus. 

The nature of integration; elementary processes and integrals; 
geometric applications to area, length, volume and surface; multiple 
integrals; use of infinite series in integration. 

Four hours credit. 

302. Differential Equations. 

A study of the more common types of ordinary differential 
equations, especially those of the first and second orders, with em- 
elementary mechanics and physics. 

Four hours lecture per week. 

303. Theory of the Definite Integral. 

A course treating of the properties and methods of computing 
definite integrals ? including a study of approximation, improper 
definite integrals, Eulerian integrals, multiple integrals, with prob- 
lems and practical applications. 



PHILOSOPHY 

201. Logic. 

A. Formal Logic. 

Simple apprehension, classification of ideas; verbal terms, the 
classification and use; logical division, definition; judgments and 
propositions, thier division according to quality, quantity and mat- 
ter; opposition, equivalence, and conversion of propositions. Reason- 
ing; fundamental principles of reasoning; the syllogism, its laws, 
figures and modes, other forms of reasoning, induction, analogy; 
classification of arguments according to their validity; sophisms; 
method; the circle. 



52 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



B. Applied Criteriology. 

Conceptual truth and the possibility of attaining it; state of the 
mind with regard to truth. Certitude; its nature, kind; Skepticism; 
the Methodical Doubt; opinion, trustworthiness of the human facul- 
ties for the attainment of truth; consciousness, the external senses; 
the intellect, Nominalism, Conceptualism, exagerated and moderate 
realism. Sources of certitude; human testimony; universal testi- 
mony; Divine testimony; tradition; History; the new criticism; objec- 
tive evidence. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Three hours credit. 

202. General Metaphysics. 

A. Ontology. 

Being and its transcendental attributes; real being, logical being; 
extension, comprehension, analogy, unity, truth, goodness. State of 
being: Actual and possible; proximate and ultimate; foundation of 
intrinsic possibility. Kinds of being: substance, accident; the Aris- 
totelian categories. Causality. Causes in general; material, formal 
and efficient; the first cause; final cause; exemplary cause. Per- 
fection of being; simple and composite; finite and infinite; contin- 
gent and necessary; time and eternity; order, beauty, sublimity. 

B. Cosmology. 

General properties of corporeal substance: quantity; continu- 
ous extension, condensation and rarefaction; impenetrability, space, 
place; motion, time; change, substance, accidents. Intrinsic con- 
stituents of corporeal substances; Atomism; Dynamism; Hylomorph- 
ism. Organic life; the vital principle, nutrition, growth; reproduc- 
tion; sensitive life, sense perceptions, sensuous appetite, spontaneous 
locomotions; the dynamic principle; the substantial form; Darwin- 
ism rejected. Three hours credit. 

301. Psychology. 

The human intellect and its proper object; its spirituality proved 
by its acts; origin of ideas; innate ideas; Empiricism and Ontologism 
rejected. The human will and its formal object; its freedom; its 
control of the other faculties. Nature of the human soul; a sub- 
stantial principle, simple, spiritual, immortal, its union with the 
body; its origin. The unity and antiquity of the human race. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Three hours credit. 

302-A. Special Metaphysics (Theodicy). 

The Existence of God; metaphysical, physical and moral proofs. 
The nature and attributes of God; His self-existence, infinity, unity, 
immutability, eternity and immensity. 



CATALOGUE 53 



His operative attributes; a. The Divine intelligence; His know- 
ledge of pure intelligence, of vision; scientia media of futuribles. b. 
The Divine will; Its holiness; Its primary and secondary objects; Its 
relation toward moral and physical evil. Action of God in the uni- 
verse; creation conservation; concurrence; Divine providence; mir- 
acles. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Two hours credit. 

401. General Ethics. 

Ethics defined. The material object of ethics; the human act, 
the voluntary, the free and deliberate, and the causes modifying the 
voluntary and the free. The foundation of morality; the ultimate 
end of man, the divine eternal law, the divine natural law. The 
formal object of ethics; the morality of human acts, the norm of 
morality, hedonism, utilitarianism, rationalism and moral positivism 
refuted, the determinants of morality, the proximate objective crite- 
rion of morality, conscience. Three hours credit. 

402. Special Ethics. 

Rights and duties in general. Man's duties toward God. Man's 
duties toward himself. Man's duties toward others. Right of own- 
ership. Social system of collectivism. Socialism. Modes of acquir- 
ing property. Society in general. The family. Divine institution, 
unity and indissolubility of marriage. Parental authority. Educa- 
tion. Civil society; its nature, origin, end. Origin of supreme civil 
authority. Specific forms of civil government. International law. 

Three hours credit. 

302-B. History of Philosophy. 

Oriental Philosophy; Greek Philosophy; Christian Philosophy; 
the Gnostics; the Neo-P'latonists; the Fathers of the Church; 
Scholastic Philosophy; the Revival of Platonism, of Aristotelianism, 
of Atomism; the Secular Philosophers; the Political Philosophers. 

Descartes and his followers; Malebranche, Locke, Hume, Vol- 
tarre, the Encyclopaedists; Leibnitz, the Scottish Schoo^ the Trans- 
cendentalists; Kant, Fichte, Schelling and their schools of thought. 
The Neo-Kantians. Current Philosophical Theories. The Neo-Scholas- 
tics. One hour credit. 



THE PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 

The Philosophy of Religion is a systematic study of religion in 
all its phases as known exclusively from the light of reason and well 
established historical facts. 

101-2. Comparative Religion. 

General notions of philosophy and religion; the definition and 



64 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

divisions of religion; a general history of the world's greatest relig- 
ions; the ways of distinguishing the true from the false religions; 
Rationalism, its history and final bankruptcy; revelation, its nature, 
necessity and history. 

201-2. Biblical Criticism. 

The historical value of the Old and New Testaments; a special 
study of the "Acts of the Apostles" from a historical and philosophi- 
cal viewpoint; inspiration, its meaning. Four hours credit. 

301-2. Analysis of Faith. 

Faith, its nature and norm; God, His Existence, Nature, Unity, 
and Trinity; the means of communication between God and Man. 

Four hours credit. 

401-2. Morality. 

Morality, its objective and subjective norms, namely Law and 
Conscience; Man's duties to himself, to his neighbor and to God. 

Four hours credit. 



PHYSICS. 

Phys. 201-2. General Physics. 

Mechanics, Sound, Light, Heat, Magnetism and Electricity. Pre- 
requisite: Plane Trigonometry. 

Lecture, two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

Given every year. 

Phys. 301-2. Physical Optics. 

Dispersion, interference, diffraction, double refraction, polari- 
zation, magneto-optics and spectroscopy... Prerequisite: Differential 
Calculus. 

Lecture, three hours per week, two semesters. 

Offered alternate years; to be given 1934-'35. 

Six hours credit. 

Phys. 303-4. Analytical Mechanics. 

A thorough study and mathematical treatment of Statics, Ki- 
netics. Prerequisite Differential and Integral Calculus, unless latter 
is taken concurrently. 

Lecture, three hours per week, two semesters. 

Given 1933-34. 

Phys. 305-6. Experimental Physics. 

Advanced laboratory work in Mechanics, Molecular Physics, and 



CATALOGUE 55 



Heat. Recommended to be taken with courses 303-4. Prerequisite: 
Courses 201-2. 

Laboratory six hours per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

Offered alternate years; given 1933-34. 

Phys. 401-2. Experimental Physics. 
Advanced laboratory work in Electricity and Magnetism. This 
includes a practical study of the properties of direct and alternating 
currents and dynamo-electric machinery. 

Laboratory six hours per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

Offered alternate years; to be given 1934-35. 

Phys. 403. Electromagnetic Theory and Related Topics. 

Lecture, two hours per week. 

One semester. Two hours credit. 

Offered alternate years. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

Ample opportunity is offered the student for physical exer- 
cises, both indoor and outdoor. A well equipped gymnasium affords 
opportunity for apparatus work. Organized leagues in baseball, 
basketball and tennis help to make these sports more interesting, 
and insure participation in them by a large number of students. A 
beautiful natural lake three minutes walk from the College makes 
it possible to have swimming during almost the whole school year. 
Instruction is given in boxing, wrestling and in track work. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

101-2. American Government. 

American National Government. The historical background 
of the Federal Constitution and of political issues in the United 
States, and the organization and functions of the National Govern- 
ment. The President. The Cabinet. The Senate. The House of 
Representatives. The Supreme Court and the Subordinate Federal 
Courts. Local and State Government in the United States. The 
place of the States in the Nation. The State Constitutions. The 
State Legislature. The State Courts. Organization and functions 
of administration in counties and cities. Six hours credit. 

201-2. Party Politics. 

The development of political parties in the United States. Im- 
portance of the extra-constitutional element in American Govern- 
ment. Party platforms. Presidential campaigns and elections. 
The nominating machinery; the Presidential primary and the 
nominating convention. Party patronage. The spoils system 



56 SPRING KILL COLLEGE 

and civil service reform. State parties and practical politics in 
local government. Two Semesters. Six hours credit. 

301-2. American Government and Party Politics. 

A more general course adapted to the needs of students who 
desire to make a less intensive study of the matter of Courses 1-4. 
Two semesters. Three hours credit. 

401-2. Constitutional Law. 

Fundamental principles of the United States Constitution 
viewed in the light of their history, development and application. 
The making of the Constitution. The Constitution regarded as a 
grant of power. Federal powers and State powers. The principle 
of "checks and balances." The doctrine of Judicial Supremacy. 
Constitutional Limitations on Legislative Power. Limits of the 
Police Power of the States. The Guarantees of the Fourteenth 
Amendment. Religious Liberty. The Fifteenth Amendment and 
the Negro Problem. State Constitutions. Two Semesters. 

Six hours credit. 

403. Comparative Government. 

A comparative study of the governmental organization and 
administration of the principal European nations. 

Three hours credit. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

101. Principles of Vocal Expression. 

Practical training in the fundamentals of effective speaking. 
Instruction on the management of the breath; methods of acquiring 
clear articulation; correct and refined pronunciation; direct, con- 
versational and natural speaking; inflection; qualities of voice and 
their use; purity, range and flexibility of tone. Individual criticism 
and conference with the instructor. One hour credit. 

102. Gesture and Technique of Action. 

The study of poise, posture, movement and gesture; spon- 
taneity of expression; correction of mannerisms; power and pathos; 
ease, grace and effectiveness of delivery. Class exercises, criti- 
cisms and conferences. One hour credit. 

201. Argumentation and Debating. 

A practical training for those students who have taken or are 
taking the course in oratory prescribed under English 4. Thought 
development; division and arrangement; argumentative, persuasive 
and demonstrative speeches; a finished argument and the fallacies 
of argument; the essentials of parliamentary law and practice; man- 
ner of conducting deliberative assemblies. Class exercises } criti- 
cisms and conferences. One hour credit. 



CATALOGUE 57 



202. The Occasional Public Address. 

Informal public address; the presentation of business proposi- 
tions before small or large audiences; impromptu and extempore 
speaking; after-dinner talks. Speeches for various occasions. Class 
exercises, individual criticisms and conferences. 

One hour credit. 



RELIGION 

101. Religion, natural and supernatural. Revelation, Histor- 
icity of the Gospels. Divinity of Christ. 

201. The Church. Christ instituted a Church. Marks of the 
Church of Christ. Prerogatives of the Church of Christ. The Catholic 
Church. The Protestant Churches. The Greek Church. 

Text: The Defence of the Catholic Church, Francis X. Doyle, 
S. J. 

201. The Nature and Obligation of Faith. The Subject-matter 
of Faith. The Existence of God. Attributes of God. The Holy 
Trinity. God the Creator of all things. Evolution. Purpose of 
Creation. 

202. The Descent of Man. The original justice of the first 
man. The fall of our first parents. Original Sin. The Immaculate 
Conception. Nature and Origin of the Human Soul. Existence and 
Nature of Angels. Fall of the bad angels. The Judgment. Hell. 
Purgatory. Heaven. 

Text: God and Creation, Thos. B. Chetwood, S. J. 

301. Christ was True Man. One Person in Christ. The Intel- 
lect, Will and Holiness of Christ. Christ redeemed us, from Sin. The 
Merits of Christ. The Worship of Christ. The Glories of Mary. 
Devotion to Mary and the Saints. Veneration of Relics and Images. 

302. The Redemption applied to Man. Existence and Nature 
of Actual Grace. Man's Natural Capacity for Good. Necessity of 
Actual Grace. The Power of Consupiscence. God's Will to Save 
(Men. Efficacious Grace. Justification and Sanctifying Grace. 
Meriting the Eternal Reward. 

Text: God the Redeemer, Charles G. Herzog, S. J. 

401. Nature of Sacraments. Baptism. Confirmation. Holy 
Eucharist. Mass. 

402. Penance. Extreme Unction. Holy Orders. Matrimony. 
Text: Channels of Redemption, Charles G. Herzog, S. J. 



58 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

SOCIOLOGY 

401. Social History. 

A survey of ancient, medieval and modern social movements and 
institutions. Marriage and the family in ancient Greece, Rome, 
among the Hebrews and in Christian times. Labor in ancient Greece, 
Rome, amog the Hebrews and in Christian times. The rise, decline, 
and suppression of the Guilds. Capitalism and the Reformation 

Three hours credit. 

402. General Sociology — The Family, 

Definition of sociology; its relations to Ethics, Revealed Religion, 
Political and Economic Sciences; Its postulates; Evolution and Soci- 
ology; Human personality and its social significance. Rights and 
Duties; Theories of Kant and Spencer. The Social Virtues: Justice, 
Charity and Equity. The nature and the ends of marriage; The 
functions of the family. Divorce, Neo-Malthusianism, Sterilization, 
The Eugenic Movement. Forces inimical to the family in the polit- 
ical, economic and social spheres. Remedial measures. Encyclical 
of Pius XI. Three hours credit. 

403. Sociology: The State and International Relations. 
Origin of the State and of civil authority. Theories of Hobbes 

Locke and Rosseau. The early American theory of the State and 
Scholastic Political Philosophy. The nature of authority and of law. 
The functions of the State. The Liberal, Socialist and Fascist State, 
intervention and State assistance: Old Age Dependency; Accidents; 
Sickness; Unemployment; Family Dependency. Social Legislation 
and Social Insurances. Representative Government and Political 
Parties; the plural vote and proportionate representation. Consulta- 
tive role of economic and professional councils in Government. 

International relations. Nationalism and internationalism; 
true and false patriotism. The World Court and the League of Na- 
tions. International cooperation in economic and other social prob- 
lems. Three hours credit. 

404. Sociology, Economic Relations. 

Property, rights and duties. False theories of property. Present 
distribution, concentration and control of wealth. Government own- 
ership. Government supervision of industry, commerce and finance 
in the interests of the common good. Capitalism as a vicious system: 
Free competition, economic domination, economic nationalism and 
imperialism, financial internationalism. The problem of wages: The 
moralty of the wage cotract. Individual and family living wage, 
minimum wage laws. Modifications of the wage system: Labor 
participation in management, profit sharing and labor stock-holding, 
industrial pensions. Strikes, lockouts and industrial arbitration. 
Labor Unions: Right of organization; functions of the Union; Col- 
lective Bargaiing. The Company Union, the closed and the open 



CATALOGUE 



shop. Defects and abuses in the present Union situation and their 
remedies. The Christian Labor Union Movement. Economic reor- 
ganization and regulation. Encyclicals of Leo XIII On the Condition 
of the Workingmen and of Piux XI On The Reconstruction of the 
Social Order. Three hours credit. 

405. Social Problems. 

Poverty: Causes, prevention, relief. Crime: causes and treat- 
ment, legal and judicial reform. Juvenile delinquency. Treatment 
of defectives. The alcoholic and narcotic problems. Heredity and 
eugenics. Three hours credit. 

406. Organized Charity. 

Public and private agencies, their cooperation. The Church 
and organized charity: the social work of the Religious Orders and 
the Sodality; Ozanam and the Saint Vincent de Paul Society. Social 
case work; the purpose, methods of investigation diagnosis and treat- 
ment. Three hours credit. 

SPANISH. 

101. Elementary Spanish. 

Grammar: Garner. Alphabet, pronunciation, accentuation, 
punctuation and capitals. The article and noun; adjectives; numer- 
als; personal and demonstrative pronouns; auxiliary and regular 
verbs. For reading: Second Spanish Book, Worman and Bransby 
(complete). First semester. Three hours credit. 

102. Elementary Spanish (Continued). 

Grammar: Garner. Pronouns (continued) — relative, interroga- 
tive and indefinite. Auxiliary and regular verbs (repeated), ortho- 
graphic changes, formation of tenses, passive voice, reflexive verbs, 
impersonal verbs. For reading: Alarcon, El Capitan Veneno. Second 
semester. Three hours credit. 

201-2. Intermediate Spanish. 

Open to students who have completed Courses 1-2- or who have 
presented two units of Spanish for admission. Advanced grammar; 
idiomatic uses of the prepositions; irregular verbs, verbs requiring 
a preposition. Composition and conversation. Colma, Lecturas Re- 
creatives; Valera, El Pajaro Verde; Alarcon, Novelas Cortas. 

Six hours creclit. 

301-2. Advanced Spanish. 

A detailed study of Spanish prose style, the reading of repre- 
sentative Spanish authors, composition and conversation. 

Six hours credit. 



60 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

103-4. Commercial Spanish. 

Practice in colloquial Spanish, commercial forms, letter-writ- 
ing and advertisements. Current journals and other literature deal- 
ing- with the life and customs of South America and Spain. Reading 
of the geography, government, industries and commerce of these 
countries. Sdx hours credit. 

303. Classical Prose. 

Selections from Cervantes, Don Quixote de la Mancha; St. The- 
resa, Life of; Ribadeneira, Historia del Cisma de Inglaterra, selec- 
tions. Kelly, History of Spanish Literature. Three hours credit. 

304. Classical Poetry. 

Fray Luis de Leon, poesias; Romancero General (Duran) ; 
Jorge Manriquo, Coplas, selections. Three hours credit. 

401. Modern Prose. 

Luis Coloma, Jeromin; Boy, La Reina Martir; Jose Maria 
Pereda, Penas arriba, Cuentos y novelas; Saj, Europa salvaje; Fer- 
nan Caballero, La Gaviota, Clemencia; Valvuena, Estudios Critices. 

Three hours credit. 

402. Modern Poetry. 

Selections from the writings of Alberto Risco, Jose Selgas, 
Nunez de Arce, Zorilla. Three hours credit 

403. Spanish Drama and Oratory. 

Classical period: selections from the writings of Calderon and 
Lope de Vega. Modern period: Tamayoy Baus, Los hombres de- 
bien, Lances de honor; Nunez de Arose, El haz de lena. Oratory. 
Donoso Cortes and Nocedal, Discursos. Three hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 61 



The Department of Commerce 

OBJECTIVES 

The Department of Commerce offers to the student 
a most thorough course in business administration com- 
bined with cultural subjects in order to cultivate the mind, 
to build thought and reasoning and that breadth of view 
which must ever be the foundation, as well of more ad- 
vanced scholarship, as of eminence in the commercial 
field. Its purposes are to prepare students for the fol- 
lowing occupational levels: (1) upper levels composed 
of proprietors and executives; (2) intermediate levels 
composed of department heads and minor executives ; and 
(3) lower levels composed of clerical and routine 
workers. 

The modern business world, highly complex in char- 
acter, is made up of a multitude of specialized units. 
These units not only compete, but also co-operate with 
each other in creating goods and services for the satis- 
faction of human wants. Those who would win success 
in the field of business must be familiar with the funda- 
mental elements of business management. They must 
develop facility in the use of quantitative instruments in 
the determination of business policies. They must recog- 
nize the larger relationships between business leadership 
and general social well-being. 

In addition to a thorough course in economics, bus- 
iness administration, and the other important branches 
of business, it affords the student a thorough training in 
mental philosophy and Christian ethics. 

At the completion of this course, in addition to ob- 
taining the degree, the student will also be prepared to 
take the State Certified Public Accountant's examination. 

In line with this statement we quote from a letter 
from The University of the State of New York, State 
Department of Education "We find that we can now ap- 



62 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

prove this course as entitling the holder of the degree to 
credit in lieu of three years of experience for admission 
to the C. P. A. licensing examination." 



BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT 

The Department of Commerce occupies quarters in 
the Main Building and in Mobile Hall. The office of the 
Head of the Department is located in the Main Build- 
ing. The Dean of the College and the rest of the faculty 
members have offices in Mobile Hall. 

The accounting and statistical laboratories are in 
the Main Building. In these laboratories students are 
provided with desks, tables, adding machines, calculators 
and other types of equipment. Class rooms are located 
in both the Main Building and Mobile Hall. 

The Department does not have a special library or 
reading rooms. All books, reports, and magazines are 
located in the Thomas Byrne Memorial Library. Com- 
fortable reading rooms are maintained there for use of 
these books, reports, and magazines. 

LECTURES AND CLASS VISITS 

In connection with the work of this department, lectures are 
given at regular intervals on subjects in course by prominent busi- 
ness and professional men of the City of Mobile, and class visits are 
made at intervals to banks and industrial establishments for the 
purpose of observation and investigation. 

DEGREE 

The subjects offered in this department comprise a four-year 
course, which leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Com- 
merce. With a view to making the work of this department as 
practical as possible, text-book study and lectures are combined with 
the laboratory method and case system, thus affording the student 
abundant opportunity to test and apply the basic principles of mod- 
ern business. > 



CATALOGUE 



63 



SCHEDULE OF B. S. C. COURSE 

FRESHMAN 



First Semester — 
Accounting Principles 3 hours 
Economic Geography 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Business Mathematics 3 hours 
Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 
Accounting Principles 3 hours 

Economic History 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Business Mathematics 3 hours 
Public Speaking 1 hour 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester — 
Advanced Accounting 3 hours 
Principles of 

Economics 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Business Law 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Introd. to Philosophy.. 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

Advanced Accounting 3 hours 
Principles of 

Economics 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Business Law 3 hours 

Introd. to Philosophy.. 2 hours 



First Semester — 
Accounting Systems 



Corporation Finance .. 3 hours 

Public Finance 3 hours 

History 3 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 



JUNIOR 

Second Semester — 
3 hours Auditing and C. P. A. 

Problems 3 hours 

Corporation Finance .. 3 hours 

Banking 3 hours 

History 3 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 



SENIOR 



First Semester — 

Cost Accounting 3 hours 

Insurance 3 hours 

Elements of Statistics 3 hours 

Advertising and 

Salesmanship 3 hours 

Philosophy 7 hours 



Second Semester — 
Income Tax Procedure 3 hours 
Public Utilities — . . 3 hours 

Business and Office 

Administration 3 hours 

Marketing 3 hours 

Philosophy 3 hours 



64 SPRING HI LL COLLEGE 

SUBJECTS IN COURSE 

Subjects with odd numbers are given in the first semester 
and subjects with even numbers are given in the second semester. 

The number of hours given is the number of hours which the 
class meets per week. 

The number of credits is the number of semester credit hours 
earned by each student who receives a passing grade when the sub- 
ject is completed. 

Freshman Courses 100, Sophomore 200, Junior 300, and Senior 
400. 

Commerce 101. Economic Geography. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

A comprehensive survey of man's utilization of the earth in 
making a living; a study of the world's major regions and of their 
present and potential production of food and raw materials for 
manufacture. Special attention will be devoted to the South in 
general and to Alabama in particular. 

Commerce 102-E. Economic History of the United States. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

The economic development of the United States from the 
period of settlement to the present time; origin and growth of lead- 
ing American industries; changes in industrial organization; com- 
mercial policies; influence of economic conditions on political 
history; problems of expansion. 

105-6. Business Mathematics. See Mathematics. 

*Commerce 111-112. Principles of Accounting. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Six credits. 

Meaning and purpose of accounting; the balance sheet; state- 
ment of profit and loss; accounts; construction of asset and 
proprietorship accounts; accounts with customers and creditors; 
adjusting and closing entries; books of original entry; controlling 
accounts; accruals and deferred items; partnerships; opening and 
closing corporation books. 

Commerce 201-E-202-E. Principles of Economics. 

Three hours. Six credits. 

An analysis of production, distribution, and consumption; 
theories concerning rents, profits, interest and wages. A discussion 
of proposed remedies for inequality of distribution of wealth; 
single tax, government ownership, profit-sharing, co-operative 
enterprises. 

*Commerce 211-212. Advanced Accounting. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Six credits. 

An advanced study in accounting theory and practice. Profits; 



CATALOGUE 65 



statements at the end of the accounting period; partnerships; cor- 
porations; installment sales; agencies and branches; consignments; 
venture accounts; accounting for insolvent concerns and statement 
of affairs. 

* Commerce 221-222. Business Law. 

Three hours. Six credits. 

Law in general, its definition, origin and sources; written and 
unwritten law; law and equity ;contracts defined and classified; 
origin of property; title to personal property; mortgages and their 
uses. 

*301-E-302-E. Corporation Finance. 

Three hours. Six credits. 

Principles of financing; forms of business enterprises; the 
corporate form and its status before the law; owned and borrowed 
capital; basis of capitalization; sources of capital funds; disposi- 
tion of gross earning; budgets; reorganization. 

* Subjects for which no credit is given unless both semesters 
are completed. 

Commerce 311. Accounting' Systems. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Three credits 

Study of reorganization in the form of consolidations, merg- 
ers, holdings companies, and trusts; description and explanation 
of the various accounting forms, books records, methods and sys- 
tems employed by various types of business. 

Commerce 312. Auditing and C. P. A. Problems. 

Two laboratory hours. Three credits. 

Qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the public auditor; 
exact rules covering every detail of making an audit of books and 
records of representative business concerns; methods of securing 
and handling engagements; working papers and audit reports; 
C. P. A. problems of an advanced nature presented and analyzed. 

Commerce 321-E. Public Finance. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

The evolution of securities; organized security markets and 
their economic functions; origin, development, purpose, and oper- 
ation of the New York Stock Exchange; the dangers and benefits 
of stock speculation; floor trader; specialist; odd-lot business; secur- 
ity deliveries, loans and transfers; the stock exchange and American 
business. 

Commerce 322. Banking. 

Three hours Three credits. 

Brief history of origin and development of banking; early 
banks and banking systems of United States; operation of the Fed- 
eral Reserve System; foreign banking systems; classes of credit 



66 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

and credit instruments; money, credit and prices; international 
exchange. 

Commerce 331-E. Transportation Principles. 

Three hours Three credits. 

Relation of transportation to industry and society; develop- 
ment and present status of American transportation systems; 
organization of transportation service; rates and regulations. 

Commerce 332-E. Foreign Trade. 

Three hours Three credits. 

Principles of international distribution; development of export 
markets; export and import machinery; trade regulation. 

Commerce 401-E. Elements of Statistics. 

Three hours Three credits. 

An introduction to statistics; a brief consideration of statistical 
theory; collection, classification and presentation of economic data; 
construction of graphs and charts; study of index numbers; prob- 
lems of statistical research. 

Commerce 402. Business and Office Administration. 

Three hours. Three credits 

Methods of organizing and controlling the work of industrial 
establishments; selection of plant site; nearness to raw materials and 
to market; available labor supply; power and transportation; profit 
sharing; types of internal organization; office administration; per- 
sonnel; standards and records. 

Commerce 411. Cost Accounting. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Three credits. 

The need and value of cost accounting; classifications of cost; 
process cost systems and specific order cost systems; manufac- 
turing expense theory; accounting for material; accounting for labor 
costs; distribution of costs; debatable methods; relative values; 
establishment and uses of standard costs. 

Commerce 412. Income Tax Procedure. 

Two hours and two laboratory hours. Three credits. 

Revenue Act of 1928; returns for individuals; gross income; 
exempt income; deductions from gross income; computation of 
taxes; income tax procedure; returns for corporations; computation 
for corporation taxes; supplementary problems. 

Commerce 421. Advertising and Salesmanship. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

The specific purpose of advertising; the copy; slogans; trade- 
marks; newspapers; magazines; advertising research; preparing and 
making the sales presentation; overcoming objections and closing 
the sale; sales promotion. 



CATALOGUE 67 



Commerce 422-E. Principles of Marketing. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

The marketing functions; marketing farm products; marketing 
raw materials; marketing manufactured products; distribution 
through brokers, jobbers, wholesalers, commission houses; market 
finance; market risk; market news; standardization; market price; 
the cost of marketing. 

Commerce 431. Insurance. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

Underlying principles, important practices and principal legal 
phases of life, fire, marine, employers' liability, fidelity, corporate 
surety, title, and credit insurance; state regulation of companies; 
underwriters' associations and their work. 

Commerce 432-E. Public Utilities. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

Characteristics of public utilities; regulation by franchises and 
commissions; valuation; rate of return; rate structures; regulation 
of service, accounts and reports; public relations; public owner- 
ship. 

Commerce 441. Real Estate. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

What real estate is; the origin and development of real estate 
ownership; practical discussion of the details involved in the con- 
duct of transactions of real estate activity. 

Commerce 442. Investments. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

A study of the underlying principles of investment credit; ele- 
ments of sound investment and methods of computing net earings, 
amortization, rights and convertibles; the investment policies of 
individuals and institutions; the investment market and its rela- 
tion to the money market. 

Commerce 452-E. The New Deal. 

Three hours. Three credits. 

Discussions of the aims, organization, provisions and the appli- 
cation of the eighteen major acts, adopted by the Special Session of 
the Seventy-third Congress, designed to enable President Franklin D. 
Roosevelt to bring about economic recovery. Special measures 
passed by the present Congress will also be treated. 

Course given 1933-34 in place of Marketing. 

Commerce 490. Preparations for the C. P. A. Certificate. 

No credit. 

Questions and problems based on examination given by the 
American Institute of Accountants. Individual instruction given. 

Examinations for the certificate of Certified Public Account- 



68 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

ant are held in Montgomery twice a year, in May and November. 
Applications may be made to the Secretary of State. 

Biology, Chemistry, Drawing, Education, English, Evidences of 
Religion, French, German, Greek, History, Latin, Mathematics, Phy- 
sics, Philosophy, Sociology, and Spanish — refer to the subjects in the 
Department of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

Note: The course in Commerce marked "E" are the same 
courses as those in Economics. For example, Commerce 201-E is 
the same as Economics 201, or Commerce 422-E is the same as 
Economics 422. 



CATALOGUE 69 



Department of Education 

The Department of Education of Spring Hill College 
was organized in August and September, 1931, in re- 
sponse to an actual need of many of its students. It began 
to function September 7, 1931, and opened its classes to 
students the following day. October 14 of the same yeai 
the Department of Education of the State of Alabama 
was formally petitioned to grant its approval of the cur- 
ricula of the college for the academic and professional 
training of teachers, and was invited to visit the institu- 
tion. In response to this invitaton, Dr. B. L. Parkinson, 
Director of Teacher Training, Certification and Elemen- 
tary Education, visited Spring Hill December 14, and in 
the due course of time, the following letter was received 
by the President: 

STATE OF ALABAMA 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

MONTGOMERY 

December 21, 1931. 
Rev. J. M. Walsh, President, 
Spring Hill College, 
Spring Hill, Alabama. 
Dear Father Walsh: 

It gives me pleasure to inform you that the organization of 
your curriculum, your teaching staff and your student teaching, as 
well as your equipment, meet the requirements for preparing teach- 
ers for secondary schools, and that we shall take pleasure in certifi- 
cating such of your graduates as you may recommend for the pro- 
fessional C and the professional B secondary certificates. 

In this connection allow me to thank you for the many courte- 
sies which you extended to me on last Wednesday when I was a 
visitor to your institution. 

With the season's greetings, I remain, 

Sincerely yours, 

B. L. Parkinson, 
Director of Teacher Training, Cer- 
tification and Elementary Ed- 
ucation. 



70 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



SECONDARY SCHOOL CERTIFICATES 



Class 


of 


Amount of 
Approved 
Training 






Scope 


Recom- 
mended 
Minimum 


Certificate 


Above H. S. 




Length of Validity 


of 


Beginning 






on which 








Monthly 






Based. 






Validity 


Salary 


C 




Three 
Years 




Three Years. 


Grades 
7 to 12 


$ 85.00 


B 




Four 


Six 


Years. Permanent aft- 


Grades 


$ 95.00 






Years 


er 


four years of success- 


7 to 12 








(Bacca- 


ful 


teaching experience. To 










laureate 


remain permanently certi- 










Degree) 


fied holder must teach four 







years out of each six-year 
period of certificate's va- 
lidity. When this is not 
done, certificate may be re- 
instated when its holder 
earns 12 semester hours of 
credit in courses approved 
by State Board of Educa- 
tion. 

Five Six Years. Permanent aft- 

Years er four years of success- 
or More ful teaching experience. To 
(Master's remain permanently certi- 
Degree) fied, holder must teach four 
years out of each six-year 
period of certificate's valid- 
ity. When this is not done, 
certificate may be rein- 
stated when its holder 
earns 12 semester hours of 
credit in courses approved 
by State Board of Educa- 
tion. 



Grades 

7 to 12 



$125.00 



SECONDARY CLASS B CERTIFICATE 

To be eligible for the Class B Secondary Professional Certifi- 
cate as of July 1, 1934, an applicant must present credentials show- 
ing: 

1. That he has graduated with the bachelor's degree from a 
standard college or university in a curriculum approved for the train- 
ing of secondary teachers. 



CATALOGUE 71 



2. That he has completed the following prescribed courses: 

Semester Hours 

a. English 

(1) Grammar and Composition 6 

(2) Survey of English Literature 6 

b. History and Other Social Studies 

(1) Introduction to History s 6 

(2) Political Science, Sociology or Economics 6 

c. Science (Biology recommended) 6 

d. General Psychology 4 

e. Education 

History of Education in the United States* 

or 3* 

History of Education* 

Educational Psychology 3 

Principles of Secondary Education* 

or 3* 

Principles of Education 

Principles of High School Teaching* 3* 

Materials and Methods of Teaching 6 

(a) Major 3 

(b) Minor 3 

Practice Teaching in Major or Minor 
Subject 3 

3. That he has to his credit an academic major of twenty -four 
semester hours in an approved subject. 

4. That he has to his credit an academic minor of eighteen 
semester hours in an approved subject. 

(N. B. *Until further notice courses marked * may be organ- 
ized on the basis of two semester hours of credit. In that event a 
sufficient number of hours in education must be offered as elec- 
tives to give the applicant for a class B Certificate a total minimum 
credit of twenty-one semester hours, and for a Class C Certificate 
twelve hours of educational subjects. Courses dealing exclusively or 
primarily with elementary education may not be accepted in meeting 
this requirement. It should be clearly understood that twenty-one 
semester hours in education is the minimum requirement, and that 
each institution may offer such courses in excess of this minimum 
as may seem desirable). 



72 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



SECONDARY CLASS C CERTIFICATE 

To be eligible for the Class C Secondary Professional Certifi- 
cate as of July 1, 1934, an applicant must present credentials 
showing: 

1. That he has completed three years of a curriculum in a 
college or university located in Alabama approved for the training 
of secondary teachers. 

2. That he has completed the following prescribed courses: 

Semester Hours 



a. English 

(1) Grammar and Composition 6 

(2) Survey of English Literature 6 

b. History and Other Social Studies 

(1) Introduction to History 6 

(2) Political Science, Sociology or Economics 6 

c. Science (Biology recommended) 6 

d. General Psychology 4 

e. Education 

History of Education in the United States* 

or 3* 

History of Education* 

Educational Psychology 3 

Principles of Secondary Education* 

or 3* 

Principles of Education* 

Principles of High School Teaching*.... 3* 



3. That he has to his credit an academic major of eighteen 
semester hours in an approved subject. 



4. That he has to his credit an academic minor of twelve semes- 
ter hours in an approved subject. 



CATALOGUE 73 



In general, to be eligible for the professional secondary cer- 
tificate, a college graduate must present a major of twenty-four (24) 
semester hours and a minor of eighteen (18) semester hours in any 
approved subject, with an additional twenty-one (21) semester hours 
in education, three of which are in supervised observation and prac- 
tice teaching. An approved subject is any subject taught in the pub- 
lic schools of Alabama. 

No subject that is not named in the course of study for the public 
high schools of Alabama as a required or elective may be accepted 
as a major, minor or a sub-minor in meeting the minimum require- 
ments for either of the three types of certificates mentioned in 
previous paragraphs. 



Degrees With Specialization 
In Education 



In the Department of Education, Spring Hill College 
offers its students an opportunity of pursuing courses in 
educational subjects either for cultural or professional 
reasons. The curricula offered provide especially for pros- 
pective Junior and Senior High School teachers and other 
educational workers. 

To follow courses in the Department of Education, 
the approval of the Head of the Department and of the 
Dean of the College is required. These courses are not 
open to Freshmen, and no one in any year who manifests 
a faulty use of English either written or spoken or any 
other defect which in the judgment of the head of the 
Department renders him unfit for high school training 
will be permitted to pursue a major in the Department 
of Education. 



74 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM OF COURSES FOR THE A. B. 
WITH SPECIALIZATION IN EDUCATION 

FRESHMAN 



First Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Latin 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Introduc'n to History 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Latin 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Introduc'n to History 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



16 



16 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester — 

English* 3 hours 

Latin 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Biology 4 hours 

General Psychology .... 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

English* 3 hours 

Latin 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Biology 4 hours 

General Metaphysics .. 3 hours 



17 



16 



JUNIOR 



First Semester — 
Survey of English 

Literature 3 hours 

General Psychology .... 3 hours 
History of Education 

in U. S 3 hours 

Chemistry 4 hours 

History 3 hours 



Second Semester — 
Survey of English 

Literature 3 hours 

Theodicy & History of 

Philosophy 3 hours 

Educational Psychology 3 hours 

Chemistry 4 hours 

History 3 hours 



16 



16 



♦Students may substitute any other subject in which they wish to 
major. 



CATALOGUE 75 



SENIOR 

First Semester — Second Semester — 

Ethics 3 hours Ethics 3 hours 

Sociology 3 hours Sociology 3 hours 

Principles of Secondary Principles of High 

Education 3 hours School Teaching 3 hours 

Materials and Methods Materials & Methods.... 3 hours 

of H. S. Teaching.... 3 hours 

Observation & Practice Observation & Practice 

Teaching 2 hours Teaching 2 hours 

Approved Electives .... 3 hours Approved Electives .. 3 hours 

17 17 

A. B. WITH SPECIALIZATION IN EDUCATION 



To satisfy the scholastic requirements for the degree of Bach- 
elor of Arts with specialization in education, each candidate must pass 
128 semester hours of work. The following courses are prescribed for 
candidates for this degree: 

Cultural: Semester Hours 

English 12 

Latin 12 

Modern Language 12 

Mathematics 6 

Introduction to History 6 

Sociology 6 

Natural Science 16 

Philosophy (Including 6 in psychology) 24 

Professional : 

Principles of Secondary Education 3 

Principles of High School Teaching 3 

Educational Phychology 3 

History of Education in U. S 3 

Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (minor field) .... 3 
Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (major field).... 3 
Observation and Practice Teaching 3 

Teaching Major and Minor: 

In addition to the above requirements, the candidate must have 
completed a major of 24 semester hours in one approved teaching 



76 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

field and a minor of 18 semester hours in another. For this degree, 
the major must be selected from group I below; the minor, from 
group I or group II. 
Group I: Group II: 

English History- 

Latin Mathematics 

French Biology 

Spanish Chemistry- 

Physics 
A composite major of 32 semester hours or minor of 24 semes- 
ter hours in cognate subjects may be selected with the written 
approval of the faculty adviser, provided a minimum of 16 semester 
hours in the case of the major, or of 12 in that of the minor be 
taken in one subject. Such a composite will be permitted in: 

Natural Science (any combination of Physics, Chemistry and 
Biology fulfilling the above requirement) ; 

Foreign Language (Latin in combination with French or 
Spanish) ; 

Mathematics (in combination with Physics) ; 

Social Science (History in combination with Sociology). 

B. S. WITH SPECIALIZATION IN EDUCATION 



To satisfy the scholastic requirements for the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science with a major in Education, each candidate must pass 
128 hours of work. The following courses are prescribed for can- 
didates for this degree: 

Cultural: Semester Hours 

English 12 

Modern Language 12 

Mathematics 14 

Introduction to History 6 

Sociology or Economics 6 

Natural Science 32 

Philosophy 18 

Professional: Semester Hours 

Principles of Secondary Education 3 

Principles of High School Teaching 3 

Educational Psychology 3 

Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (minor field).... 3 
Materials and Methods of High School Teaching (major field).... 3 

Observation and Practice Teaching 3 

History of Education in the U. S 3 

Teaching Major and Minor: 



CATALOGUE 77 



In addition to the above requirements, the candidate must 
have completed a major of 24 semester hours in one approved teach- 
ing field and a minor of 18 semester hours in another. The cultural 
courses mentioned above may be counted towards the completion of 
this major and minor. For this degree, the major must be selected 
from group I below, the minor, from group II. 

Group I: Group II: 

Biology English 

Chemistry French 

Physics Spanish 

History 
Mathematics 
Commerce 

A composite major of 32 semester hours or minor of 24 in 
cognate subjects may be selected with the written approval of the 
faculty adviser, provided a minimum of 16 semester hours in the 
case of the major, or of 12 in the case of the minor be taken in one 
subject. Such a composite will be permitted in: 

Natural Science (any combination of Physics, Chemistry, and 
Biology fulfilling the above requirement) ; 

Mathematics (in combination with Physics) ; 

Social Science (History in combination with Sociology). 



78 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



SUGGESTED PROGRAM OF COURSES FOR THE B. S. 
WITH SPECIALIZATION IN EDUCATION. 

FRESHMAN 



First Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Modern language 3 hours 

Chemistry 4 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Introduction to 

History 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Modern Language .... 3 hours 

Chemistry 4 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Introduction to 

History 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



17 



17 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester — 

English* 3 hours 

Modern Language .... 3 hours 

Mathematics 4 hours 

General Psychology .... 3 hours 

Chemistry 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

English* 3 hours 

Modern Language .... 3 hours 

Mathematics 4 hours 

Chemistry 4 hours 

Approved Electives .... 3 hours 



18 



17 



JUNIOR 



First Semester — 
Survey of English 

Literature 3 hours 

General Psychology .... 3 hours 
History of Education in 

U. S 3 hours 

Biology 4 hours 

History 3 hours 



Second Semester — 
Survey of English 

Literature 3 hours 

Educational 

Psychology 3 hours 

Biology 4 hours 

History 3 hours 

Approved Electives .... 3 hours 



16 



16 



♦Students may substitute any other subject in which they wish 
to major. 



CATALOGUE 79 



SENIOR 

First Semester — Second Semester — 

Ethics 3 hours Ethics 3 hours 

Sociology 3 hours Sociology 3 hours 

Principles of Secondary Principles of High 

Education 3 hours School Teaching 3 hours 

Materials and Methods Materials and Methods 

of High School of High School Teaching 

Teaching 3 hours Observation and 

Observation and Practice Teaching .. 2 hours 

Practice Teaching .. 2 hours Physics 4 hours 

Physics 4 hours 

18 18 



Education 301. History of Education in the U. S. 

Three Semester Hours. 

This course begins with a study of the origin and development 
of the various school systems, denominational and public, in the 
United States, section by section. It then takes up the advance- 
ment made in elementary, secondary and higher education. The 
treatment of such topics as professional education, technical and 
agricultural education, the preparation of teachers, art and manual 
education, commercial education, educational extension, profession- 
al societies, regional and national educational associations is in- 
cluded in the course. 

Education 308E. Educational Psychology. 

Three Semester Hours. 

This course considers the nature, function and measurement of 
the original tendencies of the individual, and the modifications of 
them which the school endeavors to bring about. That this purpose 
may be better effected, the student is directed in the study of the 
laws of learning, the learning curve, the efficiency and permanence 
of learning, transfer of training, the result of exercise, the meas- 
urement of achievement, the use of tests, the new type examina- 
tions. 

Education 335. Principles of Secondary Education. 

Three Semester Hours. 

This course studies the individual at the stage of his secondary 
Education, his native and acquired tendencies to action, and deduces 
principles by which the teacher may be guided in his attempt to 
direct the interest and secure the attention of the pupil. Among 
the topics considered are: the aims in instruction, the class exercise; 



80 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



the essentials of good questioning, the modes of instruction; the 
importance of study; the prelection or assignment; the repetition or 
recitation; standards and measurements; the individual and social 
elements in secondary instruction. 

Education 336. Principles of High School Teaching . 

Three Semester Hours. 

The purpose of this course is to give the student of education 
the proper concept of the present day high school. While course 
335 deals with the essentials of technique for the apprentice teacher, 
course 336 discusses some of the procedures which go to make up 
the professional skill of the master teacher. Among these are super- 
vision of pupil study, teaching how to study, the technique of visual 
instruction, socialized class procedure, project teaching and the ad- 
justment of instruction to the varying abilities of the pupil. 

Education 435-436T. Observation and Practice Teaching'. 

One and one-half or Two Semester Hours each Session. Sched- 
ule to be arranged by each student individually with the head of the 
department of education. 

In order to supplement its instruction in educational principles, 
aims, methods, curricula and procedure, and to cultivate professional 
skill in teaching, Spring Hill College has secured the cooperation of 
the Spring Hill High School. Through the courtesy of its adminis- 
trators and teachers, Spring Hill High School thus becomes the 
proving ground for the professional students of the department of 
education, who have free access to its classrooms for observation of 
the methods practiced therein and for supervised practice teach- 
ing. Cooperating with the State Department of Education, Spring 
Hill College requires that its candidates for degrees with a major in 
education present a minimum of 3 semester hours in observation 
and practice teaching with a minimum of 30 full periods of class 
teaching. 

Education M. Materials and Methods of High School Teaching. 

Three Semester Hours. 

The object of this course is to give the student an intimate 
knowledge of the reason, aim and material of the chief subjects 
found in the high school curricula, and the recognized methods by 
which they are taught. The student should emerge from the course 
with a correct perspective of the subject studied and with such a 
comprehensive view of its proper distribution that he should be ca- 
pable of constructing in it a satisfactory curriculum. Students are 
advised to choose their major and minor teaching fields at the be- 



CATALOGUE 81 



ginning of their sophomore year, and are requred to do so before 
its close, and to notify the head of the department of education con- 
cerning their choice. 

Education 335X. Extra-curricular Activities. 

Three Semester Hours. 

The purpose of this course is to instruct the students of edu- 
cation in the importance of student participation in school activities 
outside the classroom. Considerable time is devoted to the theory 
and practice of the teaching of athletic sports, football, baseball, 
basketball, track sports and boxing. The fundamental principles of 
various football systems, rules, training, special plays are among 
the topics dealt with. There is explicit insistence upon the transfer 
of training in punctuality, promptitude in the execution of plays 
and other desirable qualities from the field of play to the regular 
work of the school and of after life. Among other student activi- 
ties discussed, are the following: student council, class organization; 
club, the poetry club, the dramatic club, the literary society, the 
debating society; musical organizations — the choir, the glee club 
the band , the orchestra; the assembly; the commencement; the li- 
brary; the study hall; the athletic association; school publications — 
the annual, the school magazine; publicity and public relations. 

Education 462M. Materials and Methods of Teaching! English. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Education 466M. Materials and Methods of Teaching History. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Education 469BM. Materials and Methods of Teaching Biology 

Three Semester Hours. 

Education 469PM. Materials and Methods of Teaching Physics. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Education 470CM. Materials and Methods of Teaching* Chem- 
istry. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Education 472M. Materials and Methods of Teaching French. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Education 475M. Materials and Methods of Teaching Latin. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Education 477M. Materials and Methods of Teaching Spanish. 

Three Semester Hours. 

Education 494M. Materials and Methods of Teaching Physi- 
cal Education. 

Three Semester Hours. 



82 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

History 103. Introduction to History. 

Three semester hours. 

For a description of this and the following course see section 
on History. 

History 104. Introduction to History. 

Three semester hours. 

General Psychology 201 -P. 

Three semester hours. 

This course deals with the laws by which human reason must 
be governed in order to act conformably to its nature, and so to 
form correct and true judgments. It considers separately two dis- 
tinct sets of laws: one that our thought may be correct and con- 
sistent or conformed to the necessary laws of thinking; the other 
that our thought may be true or conformed to the objective reality 
of things. 

General Psychology 301 -P. 

Three semester hours. 

Psychology 407 studies that principle in man by which he lives, 
feels, thinks and wills. It takes account, however, only of those 
vital acts which are characteristic of man and distinguish him from 
all other living things in the visible world. The student is first 
furnished with the data which his own consciousness and that of 
other men supply as to the characters of the vital acts of thought 
and violation. From these acts he is directed to reason back to the 
nature of the principle from which they proceed, its relation to the 
body, its origin. From what it does, he gathers what it must be. 
Thus he gets a natural knowledge of the essence, origin and destiny 
of the soul scientifically, by both induction and deduction. 



CATALOGUE 



83 



PROGRAM OF COURSES IN EDUCATION 



Mon. 



Tues. 



Wed. 



Thurs. 



Fri. 



1st 2nd 1st 2nd 

Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. 

Education Education 



1st 2nd 1st 2nd 1st 2nd 

Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. Sem. 

Education Education Education 



1934-1935 
P. M. 1:00 



462M 462M 462M 

469BM 469BM 468M 469BM468M 468M 

469PM 469PM 472M 472M 469PM 472M 

335X 494M 335X 494M 335X 494M 335X 494M 494M 



2:00 301 



308E 301 



308E 



i01 



308E 



1935-1936 

A. M. 9:00 477M 



477M 



P. M. 1:00 460M 

475M 475M 

466M 

470CM 

335X 494M 335X 494M 



477M 



460M 460M 

475M 
466M 466M 

470CM 470CM 

:35X 494M 335X 494M 



2:00 335 



336 335 



335 



KEY 



Education 


101 


Education 


308E 


Education 


335 


Education 


335X 


Education 336 


Education 


436T 


Education 


462M 


Education 


466M 


Education 


468M 


Education 


469BM 


Education 


469PM 


Education 


470CM 


Education 


472M 


Education 


475M 


Education 


477M 


Education 


494M 



History of Education in the United States. 

Educational Psychology. 

Principles of Secondary Education. 

Extra-curricular activities. 

Principles of High School Teaching. 

Observation and Practice Teaching. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching English. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching History. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Mathe- 
matics. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Biology. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Physics. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Chemistry. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching French. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Latin. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Spanish. 

Materials and Methods of Teaching Physical 
Education. 



84 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



OBSERVATION AND PRACTICE TEACHING 



1. Every student who is preparing to teach is advised to select 
at the beginning of his Sophomore year the two high school sub- 
jects that he wishes to teach. The one which he prefers will be 
known as his major teaching field; the other, as his minor teach- 
ing field. He will be required to make his selection before the end 
of his Sophomore year, and to notify the head of the department of 
education concerning his choice. 

2. Every student will earn a minimum of twenty-four semes- 
ter hours in his major field, and a minimum of eighteen semester 
hours in his minor field. 

3. The student must take a course of three semester hours in 
the materials and methods of teaching his major subject, and of three 
semester hours in the materials and methods of teaching his minor 
subject. 

4. He will arrange with the head of the department of educa- 
tion to take observation and practice teaching in the high school in 
a class of either his major or his minor subject to the extent of four 
semester hours. After having made the arrangement with the depart- 
mental head, the student will report to the principal of the high 
school and then to the teacher to whose class he has been assigned 
for observation and practice teaching. 

5. The student will inform himself as to the number of se- 
mester hours of observation and practice teaching required in the 
State or the school system in which he is to teach. If four semester 
hours are demanded, the student will be required to be present in 
the high school class for a full period on each of two successive days. 
The first day, he will observe; the second, he will himself conduct 
the class during the entire period. This routine will be followed 
week after week for two semesters, the student teacher reporting 
the same days every week. A minimum of thirty full periods of 
supervised teaching will be required for credit. 

6. The student teacher is to pay strict attention to the super- 
vising teacher the first day, especially while the latter is giving the 
prelection or assignment. At the end of the period, he will inquire 
what the supervising teacher wishes him assign in the following per- 
iod. During the time of study, the student teacher will prepare 
carefully both the matter of the recitation (or repetition) which he 
is to conduct and that of the assignment (or prelection) which he ia 
to give the following day. 



CATALOGUE 85 



7. At the end of a period of practice teaching, or, preferably, 
at some other time in the course of the day, the student teacher 
will of his own accord go to the supervising teacher and ask for a 
criticism of his practice teaching. 

8. Once the student teacher has been assigned to a class for 
observation and practice teaching, the high school principal is re- 
quested to place his name on the class, roll, and the supervising teach- 
er, to check his presence or absence on the days on which he is 
expected to report, in the same way in which this is done for pupils. 

9. The supervising teacher is requested to point out the de- 
fects of the student teacher so that the latter may become aware of 
them and endeavor to remove or at least diminish them, and his good 
qualities so that he recognize them, evaluate them correctly and de- 
velop them. 

10. The supervising teacher is requested to rate the student 
teacher and to give the grade of the latter to the principal at the 
end of each month. In giving this grade, the supervising teacher is 
asked to base his judgment upon the following qualities as mani- 
fested by the student teacher: 

(a) Personality (giving evidence of authority, tact, sym- 
pathy and other desirable qualities.) 

(b) Control of subject matter. 

(c) Control of method. 



86 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Student Organizations 

As college education is accomplished not only dur- 
ing the hours of class, but also in no small degree during 
the students' intercourse with each other at other periods, 
the College heartily encourages all student organizations 
which help to develop in the student initiative, self- 
reliance and leadership in organized religious and social 
movements, qualities which are expected of college men 
generally. 

The policy of the faculty with regard to all kinds 
of college activities is that a student's first duty in col- 
lege is attention to study, and that no other student activ- 
ity should be allowed to interfere with this main purpose 
of college life. 

ELIGIBILITY RULES 

Students taking part in dramatic performances, pub- 
lic debates, oratorical or elocution contests, intercollegi- 
ate athletics and fraternities are subject to the following 
eligibility rules: (1) Actual class attendance and applica- 
tion must be satisfactory; (2) Students must have no con- 
ditions and no failures. 

SPRING HILL STUDENT COUNCIL 

The Spring Hill Student Council is elected by the 
Student Body to safeguard the honor and traditions of 
the College and to promote and direct its activities, with 
the approval of the faculty. 

MEMBERS 

Charles Houssiere „ Senior 

Joseph Bailey Senior 

John M. Callahan Junior 

Robert Lawler Junior 

Roger B. Ching Sophomore 

William Thornton Sophomore 

Louis Barasso Freshman 

OFFICERS 

Charles Houssiere President 

John M. Callahan Vice-President 

Robert Lawler Secretary 



CATALOGUE 87 



SODALITY OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION. 

The purpose of this Sodality is to develop Christian 
character under the protection of the Mother of Christ 
and to cultivate the lay apostolate. The Sodality en- 
deavors to attain this end by conducting weekly meetings 
at which the office of the Blessed Virgin is recited and 
instructions are given by the Director and by organizing 
sections for the promotion of special activities. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Edward T. Cassidy, S. J Moderator 

John Kopecky , Prefect 

Charles Houssiere Sub-Prefect 

Joseph Cure Secretary 

Jules Houssiere Treasurer 

APOSTLESHIP OF PRAYER— LEAGUE OF THE SACRED 

HEART. 

This Association aims at training its members in the 
practice of prayer and other good works by seeking in 
them the interests of the Sacred Heart of Jesus: "The 
glory of God and the good of souls.'* Meetings are held 
once a month. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Edgar J. Bernard, S. J Moderator 

John S. Daniel Prefect 

SAINT JOHN BERCHMAN'S SANCTUARY SOCIETY 

The object of this Society is to contribute to the 
beauty and solemnity of Divine Worship by the accurate 
performance of liturgical ceremonies. The members are 
accorded the privilege of serving the priests at the altar. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Edward T. Cassidy, S. J. Moderator 

John S. Daniel Prefect 

THE MENDEL CLUB. 

The object of this club is to foster interest in biologi- 
cal research work. Meetings are held once a week, at 
which papers are read by individual members, dealing 
with the results of private work. Twice a month, some 
eminent biologist or physician is invited to address the 
club. The club publishes a monthly paper, 'The Men- 
delian", devoted to biological subjects. 



88 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



OFFICERS 

Rev. Patrick H. Yancey, S. J. Moderator 

Charles Houssiere President 

Charles Wheeler Secretary- 
John M. Callahan Treasurer 

THE SPRINGHILLIAN. 

The Springhillian, formerly a quarterly publication, 
is now published monthly. It is edited by the students 
under the direction of a member of the faculty to encour- 
age self-expression and literary ambition among the stu- 
dents, and to record current events of the College. 

STAFF 

Rev. Charles J. Quirk, S. J Moderator 

John Kopecky Editor 

John Henry Associate Editor 

Charles P. Martin Literary 

John Boehm Business Manager 

Edmund Vogelgesang Exchanges 

Paul Brunson Assistant Literary 

Emmet Goodman Circulation 

Charles Moseley Freshman Sports 

James Borthwick Assistant Sports 



THE SOCIAL STUDY CLUB 

The Social Study Club was organized this year for 
the study and discussion of social problems. The relation 
of government to economic problems, and the rights and 
obligations of capital and labor were among the subjects 
discussed at the meetings during the past few months. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. William Obering, S. J Moderator 

John Kopecky President 

Charles Houssiere Vice-President 

Patrick Potts Secretary 



CATALOGUE 89 



THE PORTIER LITERARY AND DEBATING SOCIETY. 

This Society is named in memory of the learned and 
saintly prelate, the Rt. Rev. Michael Portier, D.D., first 
Bishop of Mobile, who founded the College in 1830. 

Membership is open to all students and is attained 
by those who demonstrate their literary ability to the 
satisfaction of the Society. 

The members hold weekly meetings at which they 
engage in literary and forensic exercises. They also stage 
entertainments for the student body at intervals during 
the year and a public dramatic production once a year. 
The College Debating Team is chosen from this Society. 



OFFICERS 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Chas. Houssiere President - Eugene LeCompte 

Chas. Traynor Vice-President Emmett Goodman 

Patrick Potts Secretary Patrick Potts 

Alfred Wettermark Treasurer Charles Wheeler 

Eugene Dobyns Sgt.-at-Arms Eugene Dobyns 

Moderator Mr. Louis J. Twomey, S. J. 



THE SPRING HILL CLEE CLUB 

This organization has for its aim the desire to excel 
in vocal music. Its membership is open to all students 
who are interested in vocal expression. It has one essen- 
tial requirement, however, and this is attendance at the 
practices, which are held twice a week, 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Thomas J. Shields, S. J Moderator 

Mr. Peter Colvin Director 

Nicholas Lamb President 

Roger Ching „ Librarian 



90 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

THE "S" CLUB 

This club has for its object the promotion of interest 
in athletics at Spring Hill. Membership is limited to those 
who have been awarded the letter S for excellence in any 
branch of athletics, and who are striving to live up to the 
ideals of true sportsmanship. 

OFFICERS 

Eugene LeCompte President 

Carl Shirk Vice-President 

Starks, O'Shea Secretary-Treasurer 

Joseph Martin Publicity Agent 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Spring Hill endeavors to keep in touch with its former 
students, and takes pride in their achievements. The Col- 
lege has been greatly helped by certain organizations 
formed by the Alumni in different cities for the purpose 
of fostering the recollections of their college days, and 
working for the interest of their Alma Mater. These are : 

Augusta Spring Hill College Club 
Georgia Club of Spring Hill College 
New Orleans Spring Hill College Club 
Thibodaux Spring Hill College Club 
Montgomery Spring Hill College Club 
Washington Spring Hill College Club 
Chicago Spring Hill College Club 
New York Alumni of Spring Hill College, Inc. 
The St. Louis Chapter of the Alumni Association of Spring 
Hill College 

GOLF CLUB 

To promote greater interest among the students in 
golf this organization was founded. From this club are 
selected the students who participate in intercollegiate 
and local tournaments. 

OFFICERS 

Charles Houssiere President 

Michael Donahue, Jr Vice-President 

James Dowds _ Secretary 



CATALOGUE 91 



One Hundred Third 
Annual Commencement 

OF 

Spring Hill College 

TUESDAY, MAY 30, 1933 

COLLEGE CAMPUS 
Spring Hill College 

PROGRAM 

Grand March— "Aida" Verdi 

* * * 

President's Address Very Rev. John J. Druhan, S. J. 

ADDRESS TO THE GRADUATES 

Most Rev. T, J. Toolen, D. D., 

Bishop of Mobile 

Soldier's Chorus, "Faust" Gounod 

The Glee Club 

* * * 

AWARD OF MEDALS 

* * * 

Spring Hill Graduation Song.... Prof. A. J. Staub, Mus. D. 

Mr. V. Brousse 

* * * 

VALEDICTORY 

William Peter Skeffington 

* * * 
DEGREES CONFERRED 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Woodrow W. Branson Theodore J. Polito, Jr. 

Charles James Copeland William Peter Skeffington 

Thomas Joseph Gaughan, Jr. James M. Tonsmeire 

James Horace Hynes Joseph G. Tyrrell 

William C. McDonough John Edward Wilson, Jr. 



92 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

ppr 

John Lamar Beyt, Jr. George Wesley Newburn, Jr. 

Joseph Anthony Caviezel, Jr. Elmo Murray Riley* 

Guy Charles Kaufman Ashby H. Toulmin 
Paul Henry Kurweg, Jr. 

'Degree conferred June 30, 1933. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE 

James Philip Breen, Jr. Harry Sledge Mattei 

Valsin Louis Brousse, Jr. Oscar Richard Ory 

Ernest Joseph Carlen Charles William Richard 

George Frederick Corrigan, Jr. Wilton John Smith 
Huyet Walter Fitzsimmons 

BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Malcolm Carter McFarland 
* * * 

Purple and White Spring Hill College Song 



Prizes 

THE JOSEPH BLOCK MEMORIAL MEDAL to be awarded to the 
student who contributed most to the advancement of Music at 
Spring Hill College was founded by his children: Edward Block 
of New York, Alexander Block, Mrs. Bettie Haas, Mrs. Emma 
Eichold, Mrs. Fannie B. Simon of Mobile. 

This medal was won in 1933 by William Peter Skiff ington. 

THE BISHOP O'SULLIVAN MEMORIAL MEDAL, founded in honor 
of the Most Rev. Jeremiah O'Sullivan, D. D., Bishop of Mobile, 
for excellence in Christian Doctrine and Ecclesiastical History. 
This medal was won in 1933 by John W. Kopecky. 
Next in merit, Brett R. Patton. 

THE HUTCHISON MEDAL, founded by Miller Reese Hutchison, 
E. E., Ph. D., for the best thesis in Philosophy. 
Not awarded. 

THE MERILH MEDAL, founded by Edmond L. Merilh, B. S., '17, 
of New Orleans, La., for the best English essay. 
This medal was won in 1933 "by John W. Kopecky. 
Next in merit, Malcolm Carter McFarland. 



CATALOGUE 93 



THE WALSH MEMORIAL MEDAL, founded in memory of William 
A. Walsh, A. B., '08, for excellence in Oratory. 

This medal was won in 1933 by William Peter Skeffington. 
Next in merit, Lawrence P. Artman, Jr., Brett R. Patton. 

THE O'CALLAGHAN MEDAL, donated by Rev. J. McDermott, in 
memory of Rev. C. T. O'Callaghan, D. D., for the best paper in 
Latin. 

Not awarded. 

THE MASTIN MEDAL, founded by William M. Mastin, M. D., LL. D., 
for the best paper in General and Organic Chemistry. 
This medal was won in 1933 by John W. Kopecky. 
Next in merit, William Ching, Jules Houssiere. 

THE STEWART MEDAL, donated by D. D. Stewart, M. D., for the 
best paper in Biology. 
Not awarded. 

THE DEPORTMENT MEDAL, founded by the Most Reverend 

Edward P. Allen, D. D., for Excellent Deportment, to be awarded 

by the votes of the students, with the approbation of the Faculty. 

This medal was won in 1933 by Huyet Walter Fitzsimmons. 

Next in merit, William P. Skeffington, John W. Kopecky, 

Wilton J. Smith, and Joseph Anthony Caviezel, Jr. 

THE MATT RICE SERVICE CUJP, founded by the Omicron Sigma 
Chapter of Alpha Delta Gamma in memory of Matthew P. Rice, 
A. B., '19, a founder of the local chapter and a loyal Spring- 
hillian, to be awarded to the student, who, during the year, has 
rendered the greatest service to the College. 

This cup was awarded in 1933 to William Peter Skeffington. 



94 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



CLASS ROLL 



FRESHMEN 



Adams, C. Hy., Jr. 
Allen, Harold 
Andrews, Francis J. 
Baldwin, Edward 
Barasso, Louis A., Jr. 
Baudouin, Irby 
Bell, T. D. 
Bixler, William H. 
Bland, Breen 
Bland, Jack 
Boehm, Frank J., Jr. 
Borthwick, James F., Jr. 
Boulo, Paul A., Jr. 
Brandau, Leonard 
Britton, Vernon 
Browne, F. Burton 
Bruno, Hector L. 
Bulwinkle, Ernest 
Busby, Francis E. 
Byrd, Billie 
Cain, Elisha J.,. Jr. 
Camp, William L. 
Carlin, Bernard A., Jr. 
Clikas, Tony 
Crigler, Fred D. 
Cronier, Winston 
Cure, LaVerne J. 
Dion, Louis A. 
Donahue, Michael J., Jr. 
Duval, Philip E. 
Ferguson, Louis A. 
Hails, Troy 
Harris, John C. 
Hayles, Alvin B. 
Herndon, Robin C, Jr. 
Holmes, William 



Hyde, William J., Jr. 
Hymel, Lynn 
Kilborn, Vincent F. 
Lanaux, M. Thomas 
Lavretta, John L., Jr. 
Lawley, Eugene 
Leftwich, Robert C. 
Marshall, John S., Jr. 
McClinton, Murray 
'McDonald, Daniel J. 
McEvoy, Leo 
McKee, William 
Moseley, Charles M. J. 
O'Brien, John F. 
O'Neil, Roscoe 
Palmes, Edward 
Pilkington, Albert J. 
Price, J. Albert 
Reaux, Leadice J., Jr. 
Reilly, James B. 
Rutherford, John 
Siemens, Alfred 
Springer, Francis 
Sturges, Kenneth 
Tarantino, John 
Thompson, Carey, Jr. 
Thompson, John B., Jr. 
Vasquez, Humberto 
Waller, Shannon E. 
Walsh, John Jr. 
Walsh, Thomas D. 
Ward, James 
Wilson, Louie 
Wood, George F. 
Zalumas, Jack 



CATALOGUE 



95 



SOPHOMORES 



Alves, Walter 
Bedford, Stephen 
Bordelon, J. Y. 
Bordelon, Warren 
Boyd, Harry 
Brock, Lewis A. 
Brunson, Paul W. 
Ching, Roger 
Ching, William 
Cook, James W, 
Crittenden, J. R. 
Erichsen, Julius 
Fulford, Briesten 
Gares, Everett I. 
Grymes, Douglas 
Haas, Frank E. 
Hargrove, Jack 
Hatcher, Reginald W. 
Henry, John R. 
Houssiere, Jules A. 
Hyndman, James B. 
Jordan, Joseph 
Karl, Erhard 
Kelly, Donald 
Kimble, Raymond 
Lovelace, E .L. 
Martin, William 



McCown, Lawrence 
Miller, Bertrand 
Miller, Cecil W. 
Mims, John 
O'Rourke, Michael F. 
Patout, Eugene W. 
Pearce, Lee 
Pennington, Julius 
Repoll, John 
Roney, Herbert J. 
Seifert, Marshall 
Simpson, Francis H. 
Skeffington, James 
Spafford, Edward 
Suffich, William 
Sweeney, Martin 0. 
Taube, William 
Thornton, William 
Traynor, Charles E. 
Waller, Charles L., Jr. 
Walsh, Daniel 
Webb, Buckner 
Wettermark, Alfred B. 
Wheeler, Charles 
Wilbert, Joseph 
Wulff, Donald 
Zieman, Jack 



JUNIORS 



Angle, Lanier 
Blake, William 
Bixler, Emanuel H., Jr. 
Brassell, R. T. 
Braswell, J. Bruce 
Callahan, John iM. 
Crane, Joseph 
Dobyns, Eugene 
Dowds, James J. 
Duffy, Charles 
Duffy, Daniel 
Elsevier, William 
Fort, Marshall W. 



Gilligan, William B. 
Helmsing, Joseph H. 
Hope, John C, Jr. 
Kearns, Robert 
Kerrigan, Thomas 
Lawler, Robert 
LeCompte, Eugene 
Maner, Alton 
Martin, C. P. 
Martin, Joseph 
Mudd, Dayton H., Jr. 
O'Shea, Starks 
Palmes, Jack 



96 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Powell, Marion 
Power, Daniel 
Saul, William H., Jr. 
Schenk, Joseph A., Jr. 
Sitterle, Julius, 



Skeffington, Francis 
Switzer, John E. 
Thompson, Edward L. 
Van Antwerp, Garet 
Weinacker, Robert, Jr. 



SENIORS 



Bailey, Joseph A. 
Blount, Willard H. 
Boehm, John G. 
Daniel, John S., Jr. 
Davis, Fletcher, Jr. 
DeMouy, Louis F. 
Dischler, Nicholas, 
Driscoll, Raymond 
Goodman, Emmett 
Houssiere, Chas. R. 
Houssiere, Ernest 
Kopecky, John W. 
Lamb, Nicholas A. 
Leatherwood, Wilfred 



Maisel, Irving 
North, William 
Potts, Patrick J. 
Putnam, Richard J. 
Schwing, Jules B. 
Shirk, Carl R. 
Sneeringer, Frank 
Spaf ford, James R. 
Stein, Herbert M. 
Stein, Thomas F., Jr. 
Travis, John 
Vignes, Sparks, Jr. 
Vogelgesang, Edmund 



CATALOGUE 97 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1933-34 

Adams, C. Hy., Jr Texas 

Allen, Harold Alabama 

Alves, Walter Alabama 

Andrews, Francis Alabama 

Angle, Lanier Alabama 

Bailey, Hugh B Pennsylvania 

Bailey, Joseph Pennsylvania 

Baldwin, Ed Alabama 

Barasso, Louis Tennessee 

Baudouin, Irby T., Jr Louisiana 

Bedford, Stephen Missouri 

Bell, Thomas Alabama 

Bixler, Emanuel H., Jr Alabama 

Bixler, William H Alabama 

Blake, William A Alabama 

Bland, Breen Tennessee 

Bland, Jack Tennessee 

Blount, Willard Alabama 

Boehm, Frank J., Jr Missouri 

Boehm, John G Missouri 

Bordelon, J. Y. Louisiana 

Bordelon, Warren Louisiana 

Borthwick, James Mississippi 

Boulo, Paul Alabama 

Boyd, Harry Alabama 

Brandau, Leonard Alabama 

Brassel, R. T Alabama 

Braswell, J. Bruce Alabama 

Britton, Vernon ...Alabama 

Brock, Lewis A Alabama 

Browne, Burton.: Tennessee 

Bruno, Hector Porto Rico 

Brunson, Paul Alabama 

Bulwinkle, Ernest Alabama 

Busby, Francis Alabama 

Byrd, Billie Alabama 

Cain, Elisha J. Jr Alabama 

Callahan, John M Arkansas 

Camp, William Louisiana 

Carlin, Bernard Alabama 



98 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Ching, Roger Tennessee 

Ching, William Tennessee 

Clikas, Tony Alabama 

Cook, James . Alabama 

Crane, Joseph Alabama 

Crigler, Fred Alabama 

Crittenden, James Alabama 

Cronier, Winston Alabama 

Cure, LaVerne Illinois 

Daniel, John Louisiana 

Davis, Fletcher Alabama 

DeMouy, Louis Alabama 

Dion, Louis Florida 

Dischler, Nicholas Louisiana 

Dobyns, Eugene Illinois 

Donahue, Michael J., Jr Alabama 

Dowds, James J., Jr Arkansas 

Driscoll, Raymond Connecticut 

Duffy, Charles .Illinois 

Duffy, Daniel Illinois 

Duval, Philip E Alabama 

Elsevier, William Alabama 

Erichsen, Julius Alabama 

Ferguson, Louis A. Alabama 

Fort, Marshall Alabama 

Fulford, Briesten Alabama 

Gares, Everett Louisiana 

Gilligan, William A New York 

Goodman, Emmet Alabama 

Grymes, Douglas Tennessee 

Haas, Frank E Alabama 

Hails, Troy Louisiana 

Hargrove, Jack Alabama 

Harris, John C Alabama 

HalTcher, Reginald W Georgia 

Hayles, Alvin B Alabama 

Helmsing, Joseph Alabama 

Henry, John R Mississippi 

Herndon, Robin C Alabama 



CATALOGUE 99 



Holmes, William Alabama 

Hope, John C. Alabama 

Houssiere, Charles Louisiana 

Houssiere, Ernest Louisiana 

Houssiere, Jules Louisiana 

Hyde, William Alabama 

Hymel, Lynn Louisiana 

Hyndman, James B Alabama 

Jordan, Joseph Alabama 

Karl, Erhard Alabama 

Kearns, Robert Alabama 

Kelly, Donald Alabama 

Kerrigan, Thomas Tennessee 

Kilborn, Vincent Alabama 

Kimble, Raymond Arkansas 

Kopecky, John W Texas 

Lamb, Nicholas Missouri 

Lanaux, iM. Thomas Alabama 

Lavretta, John L Alabama 

Lawler, Robert Missouri 

Lawley, Eugene Alabama 

Leatherwood, Wilfred Alabama 

LeCompte, Eugene Louisiana 

Leftwich, Robert C Louisiana 

Lovelace, Edgar L. Alabama 

Maisel, Irving Alabama 

Maner, Alton Alabama 

Marshall, Samuel Alabama 

Martin, C. P'. : Louisiana 

Martin, Joseph T Oklahoma 

Martin, William Alabama 

McClinton, Murray Alabama 

McCown, Lawrence Alabama 

McDonald, Daniel Alabama 

McEvoy, Leo C Missouri 

McKee, William Alabama 

Miller, Bertrand „ Alabama 

Miller, Cecil W Alabama 

Mims, John Alabama 

Moseley, Charles M. J Louisiana 



100 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Mudd, Dayton Missouri 

North, William Alabama 

O'Brien, John F Indiana 

O'Neil, Roscoe Alabama 

O'Rourke, Michael F Alabama 

O'Shea, Starks Mississippi 

Palmes, Edward Alabama 

Palmes, Jack Alabama 

Patout, Eugene Louisiana 

Pearce, Lee Tennessee 

Pennington, J Alabama 

Pilkington, Albert Alabama 

Potts, Patrick J Kansas 

Powell, Marion Alabama 

Power, Daniel Tennessee 

Price, J. Albert Louisiana 

Putnam, Richard J Louisiana 

Reaux, L. J., Jr Louisiana 

Reilly, James B Georgia 

Repoll, John Alabama 

Roney, Herbert J Illinois 

Rutherford, John Alabama 

Saul, William Georgia 

Schenk, Joseph Missouri 

Schwing, Jules Louisiana 

Seifert, Marshall Alabama 

Shirk, Carl R Louisiana 

Siemens, Alfred Illinois 

Simpson, Francis Mississippi 

Sitterle, Julius Alabama 

Skeffington, Francis -Georgia 

Skeffington, James Georgia 

Sneeringer, Leo F Alabama 

Spafford, Edward Alabama 

Spafford, James Alabama 

Springer, Francis Alabama 

Stein, Herbert Alabama 

Stein, Thomas F Alabama 

Sturges, Kenneth Florida 



CATALOGUE 101 



Suffich, William Alabama 

Sweeney, Martin Alabama 

Switzer, John Louisiana 

Tarantino, John Georgia 

Taube, William Alabama 

Thompson, Carey Louisiana 

Thompson, Edward L Alabama 

Thompson, John B Georgia 

Thornton, William Alabama 

Traynor, Charles E., Jr Georgia 

Travis, John J Missouri 

Van Antwerp, Garet Alabama 

Vasquez, Humberto Mexico 

Vignes, Sparks, Jr. Mississippi 

Vogelgesang, Edmund R Alabama 

Waller, Charles Alabama 

Waller, Shannon .Alabama 

Walsh, Daniel Louisiana 

Walsh, John Tennessee 

Walsh, Thomas Alabama 

Ward, James Florida 

Webb, Buckner G Alabama 

Weinacker, Robert Alabama 

Wettermark, Alfred Louisiana 

Wheeler, Charles Florida 

Wilbert, Joseph Louisiana 

Wilson, Louis Alabama 

Wood, George F Alabama 

Wulff, Donald Alabama 

Zalumas, Jack .Georgia 

Zieman, Jack Alabama 



102 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



SATURDAY CLASSES— 1933-34 



Mrs. J. 0. Acree 

Miss Helen Allen 

Miss Lorine Autry 

Mr. Edgar Barre 

Miss Freddie Bateman 

Miss Edwina Benthol 

Miss Grace L. Brandon 

Miss Elizabeth Buckley 

Mrs. Pat Byrne 

Mrs,. Eva Lee Caviezel 

Mr. Peter J. Golvin 

Miss Lavinia Connerly 

Miss Katherine W. Craig 

Miss Eileen Currie 

Mrs. R. F. Darrah 

Mrs. Ruth Douglas 

Miss Mary Sands Dreisbach 

Miss Annie Katherine DuValle 

Miss Margaret Mary Flock 

Miss Alice M. Fowler 

Miss Mary Frances Goodman 

Miss Ella Posey Gordon 

Miss Ouida Hartin 

Miss Claudia Hartley 

Miss Allene Hester 

Mr. Jacque Hauser 

Miss Genevieve Jarvis 

Miss Marie Kastner 

Miss Modesta Keoughan 

Miss Eola Margaret Lane 

Mrs. Ruth Laubenthal 



Miss Loretta Ledet 
Miss Catherine Lining 
Miss A. M. McCreary 
Miss Jewel Malette 
Miss Betty Maury 
Mrs. Claude Mullen 
Miss Rena Murphy 
Miss Margaret Oteri 
Miss Ellen Peterson 
Miss Lillian Pistole 
Miss Aline Posey 
Miss Florence Ponder 
Miss Celestine Pratt 
Miss Irene Reilly 
Miss Alice Riggs 
Miss Betty Roe 
Miss Grace Schenher 
Miss Margaret Shaw 
Miss Marjorie Smith 
Miss Margaret Smith 
Miss Marguerite Smith 
Miss Lucile Torrey 
Mrs. Charles B. Vaughan 
Miss Genevieve Walsh 
Miss Mimi Walsh 
Miss Genevieve Wilson 
Miss Mildred Wright 
Miss Marietta Yarborough 
Miss Fidelis Yeend 
Miss Catherine Yeend 
Miss Mildred Yousko 



BROTHERS OF THE SACRED HEART 



Brother Aiden 
Brother Albert 
Brother Hugh 



Brother Roland 
Brother Roger 



CATALOGUE 



103 



SISTERS OF CHARITY 



Sister Anita 
Sister Mary Ellen 



Sister Mary Isabel 
Sister Stephanie 



Sister M. Harriet 



SISTERS OF LORETTA 

Sister Romona Marie 



SISTERS OF MERCY 



Sister Mary Agnes 
Sister Mary Aloysius 
Sister Mary Benigna 
Sister Mary Catherine 
Sister Mary Consuela 
Sister Mary Doloretta 



Sister Mary Elizabeth 
Sister Mary Gabrielle 
Sister iMary of Mercy 
Sister Mary Placida 
Sister Mary Regis 
Sister Mary Rosarii 



INDEX 
GENERAL CATALOGUE 

Page 

Administration 15 

Admission 21 

Alumni Associations 90 

Attendance 15 

Calendar 3 

Certficiates In Education 70-3 

Class Roll 94 

Credentials 21 

Curriculum 9 

Degrees 25 and 62 

Degrees With Specialization In Education 73-9 

Discipline 16 

Examinations 16 

Expenses 18 

General Statement 6 

Grounds and Buildings 7, 8 and 62 

Historical Statement 6 and 69 

Location 6 

Objectives 61 

Officers of Instruction and Administration 4 and 5 

Prizes 92-3 

Register of Students 97 

Remarks on Regular Courses 33 

Requirements for Graduation 25 

Schedule for Regular Courses 28, 29 and 63 

Student Organizations 86 

Special Students 23 

Subjects in Course 36, 64 and 79 

System of Education 10 

Testimonials 21 

Transcript of Record 17 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Catalogue 1934-1935 
ANNOUNCEMENTS, 1935-1936 




A College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, founded in 1830. 
Chartered as a college by the Legislature of Alabama in 
1836; empowered by Pope Gregory XVI to grant degrees 
in philosophy and theology in 1840 ; member of the South- 
ern Association of Colleges, the Association of American 
Colleges, and of the Association of Alabama Colleges. 

Corporate title: "The President and Trustees of the 
Spring Hill College, in the County of Mobile, Alabama." 



Spring Hill, Mobile County, Alabama 
March, 1935 



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16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


1!) 


20 


21 


22 


23 


> 2 


2 '.'■ 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 












27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


29 


30 


31 











CALENDAR, 1936 



January 


February 


March 


April 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 








1 


2 


3 


4 














1 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 








1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


29 


30 


31 










26 


27 


28 


29 


30 






May 


June 


July 


August 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 

1 


S 
2 


S 


M 
1 


T 
2 


W 
3 


T 

4 


F 
5 


S 
6 


S 


M 


T 


W 

1 


T 

2 


F 

3 


S 
4 


s 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 

1 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


28 


29 


30 










26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


31 










































30 


31 




.. .-[. . 






September 


October 


November 


December 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 


S 


M 


T 


W 


T 


F 


S 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 










1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 








25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


29 


30 












27 


28 


29 


30 


31 







College Calendar 

1935-1936. 

1935 

Sept. 10 — Registration. 

Sept. 11 — First classes of the session. 

Sept. 19 — Fine for late registration begins. 

Sept. 21 — Last day for conditioned examinations of 
previous year. 

Sept. 23 — Mass of the Holy Ghost. 

Nov. 1 — Feast of All Saints. Holiday. 

Nov. 28-29 — Thanksgiving Holidays. 

Dec. 8 — Feast of the Immaculate Conception. 

Dec. 20 — Christmas Holidays begin after last class of 
the day. 

1936 

Jan. 3 — All classes resume. 

Jan. 20 — Beginning of semester examinations; regis- 
tration for the second semester. 

27 — First classes of the second semester. 

5 — Fine for late registration begins. 

11 — Annual retreat begins.<*f" A°~*^ , 

Feb. 24-25 — Shrovetide holidays 

March 19 — Feast of St. Joseph, Patron of the College 

8 — Easter recess begins 

14 — All classes resume. 

26 — Commencement exercises. / 

30 — Second semester ends. 




TRUSTEES OF SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



VERY REV. JOHN J. DRUHAN, S. J., Chairman 

REV. GEORGE G. McHARDY, S. J., Secretary 

REV. THEODORE A. RAY, S. J. 

REV. ANDREW C. SMITH, S. J. 



REV. JA i MEO-r." WHEL AN, S. J. 



THE SPRING HILL COLLEGE FOUNDATION 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



VERY REV. JOHN J. DRUHAN, S. J., Chairman 

REV. GEORGE G. McHARDY, S. J. 

THOMAS M. STEVENS, LL. D. 

J. M. WALSH 

MATTHIAS M. MAHORNER, A. M., LL. B., LL. D. 

DAVID R. DUNLAP 

VERY REV. JOSEPH M. WALSH, S. J. 



Administrative Officers 

OF THE COLLEGE 

mi urn **v-/f 34. 

VERY REV. JOHN J. DRUHAN, S. J., Prezident 

REV. ANDREW C. SMITH, S. J., Dean and Prefect of Studies 

REV. J. L l AMDERT DORMj S. J., Prefect of Discipline 

REV. E DWARD T. OAOOID ' Y , S. J., Student Counsellor 

REV. THEODORE A. RAY, S. J., Treasurer 

REV. GEORGE G. McHARDY, S. J., Superintendent of Buildings 

and Grounds 

LOUIS J. BOUDOUSQUIE, B. S., Registrar 

MARIE YVONNE JAUBERT, A. B., M. A., B. L. S., Librarian 

NORBORNE R. CLARKE, JR., A. B., M. A., M. D., Director of 

Student Health Service 



Standing Committees of the Faculty 

Committee on Admissions and Degree*: 

Rev. Andrew C. Smith, S. J., Professor Boudousquie, 
Rev. Patrick H. Yancey, S. J., Professor Hart, Professor Sulya. 

Committee on Athletics: 

Rev. J. Lambert Dorn, S. J., Professor Donahue, Professor 
Ducote. 

Committee on Curricular Problems: 

Rev. Patrick H. Yancey, S. J., Rev. William Obering, S. J., 
Rev John Hutchins, S. J. 

Committee on Examinations: 

Rev. John V. Deignan, S. J., Rev. Francis Janssen, S. J., 
Rev. William Mulherin, S. J. 

Committee on Discipline: 

Rev. J-.- Lambert Dorn, S. J., -Rzv~. — Ddiiie i — W. Uronm, b. J., 
Messrs. Cran4, Donnelly, Lang, and Twomey, S. J. 
Committee on Student Activities 'Mf t^J^^^ , s 

Rev. - E'dward T - .-Ca!JSld y, S. J., Rev. x\i J..^ Wmffiblflwdrte' 1 J -, 
Mr. Louis J. Twomey, S. J., Professor Edward V. Cupero. 

Committee on Publications: 

Rev. Charles J. Quirk, S. J., Mr. Haixjt — L* — Gsaj^e, S. J., 
Professor MnnnqTwtin. £.0 ]|iv» k^tA 






v/. .7. MsL^o^rr^ 



/«*_<, Cra^<LuJL , T"^, <** 



The Faculty 




, LOUIS J. BOUDOUSQUIE, B. S., Professor of Drawing; Instructor 

in Mathematics. 
REik-E©WA«D T; CASSmY7~S. J., M. A., Professor of Religion 

and Ethics. 
.. H A PPY T , CRANE, 0. J., M. A., Instructo r in History and P^Ii lTcal 

Science: — - 
-ow r>A^y^ T|¥ n P ^xTTXT s j } M A ^ p rofessor f Mathematics. 

EDWARD V. CUPERO, Mus. D., Professor of Music. 

REV. JOHN V. DEIGNAN, S. J., Ph. D., Professor of Chemistry, 

and Head of the Department. 
MICHAEL J. DONAHUE, A. B., Professor of Economics and Physi- 
cal Education. 
RE V. J. LAMBERT PORN, G. J., M. A., Professor of Education 
T?TmTAT?n j nTT|nnT-rc a t\ j t\ n As s ociat e PraEessos "f rf^ m - 

merce and Finance; Assistant in Physical Education. 
WILLIAM PATRICK DONNELLY, S. J., M. A., Instructor in His- 
tory and Ancient Classics; Assistant Professor of Education. 
HUGH BRYS O N C LASS, Ph. P., A sstistaTTt^ rofessor of C n-emretry. 
KERMIT T. HART, B. S. B. A., Professor of Accounting, and Head 
of the Department of Commerce and Business Administration. 
, REV. JOHN HUTCHINS, S. J., M. A., Professor of French. 

REV. FRANCIS L. JANSSEN, S. J., M. A., Professor of German and 

Ancient Classics, Head of the Department of Languages, 

Instructor in Philosophy. 

REV. MICHAEL KENNY, S. J., Ph. D., Litt. D., Special Lecturer in 

History and Philosophy. 

E. CECIL LANG, S. J., M. A., Instructor in Mathematics. 

J EUGENE T. MONACHAN, M . A., Inotructor in .Spanis h. 

REV. WILLIAM A. MULHERIN, S. J., M. A., Associate Professor 

of Philosophy, Professor of Logic, Psychology, and 

Philosophy of Religion. 

Wfi flalAM E. — NORTII, B. Si, Inotruclui in ChemibUy; Laboratory 

Afisjst a .n t-JB— Biologyr 
REV. WILLIAM F. OBERING, S. J., Ph. D., Professor of Ethics and 

Sociology; Head of the Department of Philosophy. 
REV. CHARLES J. QUIRK, S. J., M. A., Professor of English and 

Head of the Department. 

REV. ANDREW C. SMITH, S. J., Ph. D., Assistant Professor of 
English, Instructor in Philosophy of Religion. .. 



. 



REV. LOUIS J. SONIAT, S. J., M. A., Instructor in French. 

< LOUIS L. SULYA, M. S., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

.LOUIS J. TWOMEY, S. J., M. A., Instructor in English and Public 

Speaking. 

REV. ANTHONY J. WEGTLAND, a. J., M. A., Protessor of Physics. 

REV. PATRICK H. YANCEY, S. J., Ph. D., Professor of Biology 
and Head of the Department. 



Other Officers 



EDGAR BARRE, Secretary to the President 

GODFREYS. JU - M r-S 1 . J-, As s is t ant Treasure r 

BROTHER MARTIAL LAPEYRE, S. J., Dietitian 

MRS. ALBERT LEVET, R. N., Director of the Infirmary 

C. W. MILLER, Secretary to the Dean 

MARSHALL SEIFERT, Assistant Registrar 

JOSEPH G. TYRRELL, A. B., Secretary to the Treasurer 

CLIFFORD LOUISELL, Library Attendant 



STUDENT ASSISTANTS 

Accounting: «v 'iprfty Tnnmp^'H ' ri 

'Chemistry: Briesten Fulford. 

Library: Francis J. Andrews,. William Elsevier, John Lawler, 
Charles McConaghy, Harold Martin; C*wH*HPiiiii», Thomas Steely. 



Y^*V\>»v**^ 



f \~* i ~ '• 



e,.a^ 






General Statement 



HISTORY 

Spring Hill College enjoys the distinction of being 
one of the first institutions of higher learning established 
in the South. It was founded in the year 1830 by the 
Rt. Rev. Michael Portier, D. D., the first Bishop of Mobile. 
In 1836, the Legislature of the State of Alabama incorpo- 
rated it, giving it all the rights and privileges of a 
university, and in the year 1840, the Sovereign Pontiff, 
Gregory XVI, empowered it to grant canonical degrees 
♦ in philosophy and theology. In 1847 the management of 
the College was entrusted to the Society of Jesus, whose 
members have since endeavored to make it a center of 
liberal culture. Spring Hill College was admitted to 
membership in the Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools of the Southern States in 1922. In 1931 it was 
approved for the training of teachers by the Department 
of Education of the State of Alabama. 

SITUATION 

Spring Hill College is picturesquely situated on an 
elevation two hundred feet above the sea level in Mobile's 
most beautiful residential district. The natural beauty of 
its site adorned with an almost endless variety of trees 
and shrubs and flowers, its artificial lake, its shaded ave- 
nues and the striking setting of its athletic fields and of 
its buildings, make the Spring Hill campus one of the 
most attractive college sites in the United States. 

Owing to its altitude and to the invigorating influ- 
ence of its resinous pines upon the surrounding atmos- 
phere, Spring Hill holds one of the best records for health 
in the country. In fact, very eminent physicians, well 
acquainted with our American colleges, have declared it 
pre-eminently desirable for students on account of its 
climatic advantages and perfect hygienic arrangements. 
Prhe records of the United States Weather Bureau of 
% Mobile show that for a period of fifty years there is an 
v average of only ninety-five cloudy days a year; and most 



CATALOGUE 



of these were only partly cloudyj Besides, the temper- 
ature is most equable ; figures for the school year during 
the last ten years showing that the City of Mobile enjoys 
an average of 62.7 degrees. Outdoor exercise continues 
uninterruptedly from the beginning of the school year to 
the end. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

Spring Hill College has extensive acreage, which af- 
fords ample room for buildings and athletic fields. The 
group of buildings consists of the Main Building, Mobile Q 
Hall Yenni Hall, the Infirmary, the Chapel, the Thomas * ^^4^^ 
Byrn4 Memorial Library, and the Recreation Hall. 

THE MAIN BUILDING was erected in 1869, and is 
a substantial brick structure, several hundred feet in 
length and three stories high. The central part is occu- 
pied by the Faculty and the Administrative offices. From 
the third gallery of this building one may get a most 
beautiful view of the surrounding country, with its pine- 
clad hills, and the Bay of Mobile in the distance. 

MOBILE HALL, which was dedicated November 6, 
1927, is a splendid dormitory building, with rooms that 
leave nothing to be desired in the way of utility and com- 
fort. Each one is large and airy, and provided with its 
own clothes press, toilet and hot and cold shower. There 
is also a beautiful lounging room. 

S YENNI HALL, erected and named in memory of ^^-4 
Rev. Dominic Yenni, S.J., Professor of Latin and Greek x > 

at Spring Hill for over fifty years, and author of Yenni's 
Latin and Greek Grammars, is entirely devoted to Science. 
Here are installed the Physics, Chemistry and Biology 
lecture rooms and laboratories, and the Seismographic 
Station, which is one of the few in the entire South. 



10 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

THE INFIRMARY BUILDING is separated from the 
other buildings, and is equipped to take care of all ordi- 
nary cases of illness. It is supplied with a complete phar- 
macy, and is under the direction of a physician of Mobile, 
who visits the College regularly. 

THE CHAPEL occupies the center of the architec- 
tural group, and is connected with the main building by 
concrete galleries. It is a stately Gothic structure and 
is generally considered the most perfect building of its 
kind in the South. 

THE THOMAS BYRNE MEMORIAL LIBRARY, a 
gift of Mrs. Thomas Byrne in memory of her husband and 
son, was completed in 1930. It has room for 150,000 
volumes. It contains a general reading room large enough 
to accommodate 200 students. There are moreover spe- 
cial rooms for research work and a large lecture room. A 
special section of the building contains the Lavretta 
library, donated by Mr. L. C. Lavretta, a Mobile Alumnus. 

THE RECREATION HALL is mmA as a recreation 



>^. 



Spring Hill has several athletic fields, and ample 
ace for more. One, in particular, is exceptionally fine. 
It is called Maxon Field, after a former coach of the 
College — a stretch divided in half by a beautiful avenue 
of aged oaks, and surrounded by stately pines. A nine- 
hole golf course is. maintained, affording an opportunity 
for those, who may be inclined to engage in this fascinat- 
ing sport. 



CATALOGUE 




mw 



SYSTEM OF EDUCATION 



The officers and teachers in the College are for the 
most part members of the Jesuit order, an organization, 
which from its origin, has devoted itself to the education 
of youth. It conducts high schools, colleges and univer- 
sities throughout the United States, and has more than 
twenty-five thousand students in its various institutions. 

The principles of education, which have made the 
Jesuits successful in educational work throughout the 
world, and which are followed at Spring Hill, as in every 
Jesuit institution, are set forth in the Ratio Studiorum, a 
body of rules and suggestions outlined by the most prom- 
inent Jesuit educators in 1599, revised in 1832, and at- 
tended up to the present day with unfailing results. 

Truly psychological in its methods, and based upon 
the very nature of man's mental process, it secures on the 
one hand that stability so essential to educational thor- 
oughness, while on the other, it is elastic, and makes lib- 
eral allowances for the widely varying circumstances of 
time and place. While retaining, as far as possible, all 
that is unquestionably valuable in the older learning, it 
adopts and incorporates the best results of modern pro- 
gress. It is a noteworthy fact, however, that many of the 
recently devised methods of teaching, such as the Natu- 
ral, and Inductive and similar methods, are admittedly 
in reality mere revivals of devices recommended long 
ago in the Ratio Studiorum.* 

As understood by the Jesuits, education in its com- 
plete sense, is the full and harmonious development of 
all those faculties that are distinctive of man. It is more 
than mere instruction or the communication of knowl- 
edge. The acquirement of knowledge, though it neces- 
sarily pertains to any recognized system of education, is 



*Those who are desirous of further information on the subject 
are referred to The Jesuits and Education by William J. McGucken, 
S. J. (Bruce: Milwaukee, 1932.) 



12 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

only a secondary result of Education itself. Learning is 
an instrument of education, which has for its end culture 
and mental and moral development. 

PURPOSE AND CONTENT OF COURSES 

The purpose of Spring Hill College is to educate in 
the fullest sense, that is, to develop thoroughly and har- 
moniously the faculties of the whole man — intellectual, 
moral and physical. It assumes that on this harmonious 
development will depend the character of the students 
and the measure of their future utility to themselves and 
to the community ; and it aims to give that solid training 
of both mind and heart, which will make for this develop- 
ment and will fit the student for the just interpretation 
and use of life. 

In the intellectual training of its students, the insti- 
tution aims at laying a solid foundation in the elements 
of knowledge and at opening the mind to a generous 
share in the culture of life. For this reason the studies 
are chosen each for its distinct educational value and as 
a part in a complete and nicely adjusted system. The 
studies are so graded and classified as to be adapted to 
the mental growth of the student and to his orderly ac- 
quisition of knowledge. 

The courses leading to degrees embrace instruction 
in the departments of philosophy, sociology, language, 
literature, history, science and mathematics. The aim 
of these courses is to give the student a complete liberal 
education, which will train and develop all the powers of 
the mind, and will cultivate no one faculty to an exag- 
gerated degree at the expense of the others. The college 
ideal is not to foster specialization, but to cultivate the 
mind, to build thought and reasoning and that breadth of 
view which must ever be the foundation as well of more 
advanced scholarship, as of eminence in the professions 
or other stations of life. 

The two-year courses are designed for those students, 



CATALOGUE 13 



who are unable to spend four years in a regular Arts or 
Science course. 

MORAL AND RELIGIOUS TRAINING 

In its moral and religious training, the college aims 
at building the conscience of its students for the right ful- 
filment of their civil, social and religious duties. There is 
insistence on the cultivation of the Christian virtues which 
operate for this fulfilment; and, as the only solid basis 
of virtue and morality, thorough instruction in the prin- 
ciples of religion forms an essential part of the system. 
Students of any denomination are admitted to the courses, 
and all are required to show a respectful demeanor dur- 
ing the ordinary exercises of public prayer. The Catholic 
students are required to attend the classes in Religion, to 
be present at the chapel exercises, to make an annual re- 
treat, and to approach the Sacraments at least once a 
month. The non-Catholic students are required to take 
courses in the history and fundamental tenets of all re- 
ligion. They are also expected to assist at such college 
chapel services as the Mass of the Holy Ghost, inaugurat- 
ing the school year, and the Baccalaureate Sermon which 
closes it. 

THE STUDENT COUNSELLOR 

One of the Fathers on the Faculty is appointed as 
counsellor or adviser of the students. His principal duty 
is to direct the spiritual activities of the college and the 
various religious societies and sodalities, in regard to 
whch he exercises much the same supervision as the Pre- 
fect of Discipline exercises in his department. 

He is in a special sense the friend and adviser of the 
students not only in matters directly spiritual but also 
material and temporal, in their studies, their social du- 
ties, and in other intimate and personal matters. 

One of the questions of highest importance to every 
college graduate is the wise choice of a profession or vo- 
cation according to one's character, talents and attrac- 
tions, both natural and supernatural. In this matter the 
assistance of the Student Counsellor will be invaluable. 
His hours will be arranged to afford ample opportun- 
ity of conferring with him. 



14 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



/ 



Administration 



SESSIONS -^^j. 

The school year begins £n the second w&ek of Sep- 
tember and ends tit&ihe beginning of June. The year is 
divided into two semesters or sessions of eighteen weeks 
each. The first semester ends during the last week of 
January. The second begins immediately thereafter, 
without mid-year holidays. 

ATTENDANCE 

Since the purpose of college education is not only to 
impart information and develop the mental faculties, but 
also, if not chiefly, to train the student in habits of 
punctuality and fidelity to duty, prompt attendance at 
all class meetings is constantly stressed, and the co-oper- 
ation of parents and guardians in this important matter 
is earnestly requested. The date of registration and the 
limits of the various holiday periods are clearly stated in 
this catalogue, and will be strictly adhered to. - 

While it is left to the discretion of the Dean to grant 
excuse for class absence in the case of sickness or simi- 
larly grave cause, the responsibility for absence ordin- 
arily rests with the student. It is to his interest to see 
that unauthorized absence from any course does not ex- 
ceed twice the number of semester hour credits allowed 
for that course. The penalty for such excessive absence 
is that the student's registration in such courses will be 
automatically canceled, and accordingly no credit given 
for the course. In special cases, the delinquent may be 
reinstated by the Committee on Registration and De- 
grees, upon written recommendation of his Instructor. 

Tardiness in class attendance is regarded as a par- 
tial absence. Three tardy marks will constitute one cut. 



CATALOGUE 15 



DISCIPLINE 

THE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM employed by the 
College includes, as one of its most important features, 
the formation of character. For this reason, the disci- 
pline, while considerate, is unflinchingly firm, especially 
when the good of the student body and the reputation of 
the institution are concerned. 

While it is the policy of the faculty to trust as much 
as possible to the honor of the students themselves, in 
carrying on the government of the college, nevertheless, 
for the maintaining of order and discipline, without 
which the desired results are not attainable, regular and 
punctual attendance, obedience to college regulations, 
serious application to study and blameless conduct will 
be insisted upon; and honor, fair-dealing, self-restraint 
and fortitude will be demanded as the natural and ne- 
cessary virtues of genuine character. Any serious breach 
of college discipline, repeated violation of regulations, 
neglect of studies, the possession or use of intoxicating 
liquors, and other offenses against morals or discipline 
which, in the judgment of the faculty, reflect on the good 
name of the college, render the offender liable to dis- 
missal. 

The college reserves the right to dismiss at any time 
a student who fails to give satisfactory evidence of ear- 
nestness of purpose and of interest in the serious work of 
college life. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Examinations in all subjects are held at the end of 
each semester. Besides, there are intra-semestral tests. 
The semester examination, together with the average of 
the months preceding, determine the standing of a pupil 
for the semester. The results of all examinations 
and tests are mailed to parents and guardians. If a pupil, 
on account of sickness or any other cause, misses a writ- 
ten test or an examination in any subject, he will be re- 



16 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

quired to make it up. In such cases, however, the re- 
sponsibility rests with the student, and his record will 
show zero until such test or examination is taken. 

Seventy percent is required for passing in each sub- 
ject. Conditions may be incurred by failure to satisfy the 
requirements of any course, which requirements include 
the recitations, tests, and other assigned work, as well 
as the examinations. A condition due, either to failure in 
a monthly test or in a semester examination, may be re- 
moved by a supplementary test or examination. The 
supplementary tests may be taken at the convenience of 
the professor. The supplementary examinations are 
held, upon recommendation of the department concerned 
and with the approval of the dean of the college, during 
the first month of the succeeding semester. They may 
be taken only on the days specified, and may not be de- 
ferred, except with the express consent of the dean. For 
each subject a fee is charged, payable in advance to the 
treasurer of the college. Removal of conditions by ex- 
aminations shall not entitle the student to a grade higher 
than seventy per cent. 

A condition due to failure to complete assigned work 
may be removed by making up the required work. This 
ordinarily entails a fine of one dollar. 

PROMOTION ^4 

Those students are ranked as Sophomores who 
have at least twenty-four creditj hours and points and 
have completed the prescribed! courses of Freshman 
year; Juniors those who have wirty credits and points 
and have completed the prescribed courses of tJiejSopho- 
more year; Seniors, those who have ninetySx credit 
hours and points and have completed the prescribed 
courses of the Junior year. 

No student will be considered a candidate for gradu- 
ation if he has any deficiency at the beginning of the sec- 
ond semester of the Senior year. 



CATALOGUE 17 



REPORTS 

At least four times a year, i. e., in November, Febru- 
ary, April and June detailed reports of scholarship and 
conduct are issued from the Dean's office. At other 
times also similar reports will be furnished to interested 
parents or guardians upon request. 

TRANSCRIPT OF RECORD 

Students wishing transcript of records in order to 
transfer from this College to another, or for any other 
purpose, should make early and seasonable application 
for the same. No such statements will be made out dur- 
ing the busy periods of examination and registration. 
The first transcript of record is furnished free. For each 
additional copy there is a charge of one dollar. 

EXPENSES 
General 

The general expenses of the student are grouped 
under the BASIC FEE. The basic fee varies with room 
and building accommodations selected by the student or 
his parents. It includes the following items with amounts 
of charges per semester: 

Tuition $ 75.00 

Board 120.00 

Medical Fee 10.00 

Athletic Fee 1 10.00 

Library Fee - 10.00 

Activities Fee 5.00 

Room and Laundry (Mobile Hall) 75.00 

Room and Laundry (Quinlan Hall) 50.00 

N. B. — Rooms are shared by two occupants. Single oc- 
cupancy entails a fee of $25 per semester. 

A. Basic Fee for Boarding Students (per semester) . 

Quinlan Hall $280.00 

Mobile Hall '. 305.00 



18 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

A matriculation fee of $10.00 and a deposit of $10.00 
for room and reservation must accompany each applica- 
tion for entrance. 

A deposit of $50.00 (per semester) is required for 
resident students to cover the cost of books and incidentals 
and to provide for spending money. 

B. Basic Fee for Day Students (per semester). 

Tuition $75.00 

Athletic Fee 10.00 

Library Fee 10.00 

Activities Fee 5.00 

The above are fixed charges for every student. 

Special Fees (per year). 

Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Laboratory, each ...$15.00 

Breakage Deposit ( in each Science Course) 5.00 

Accounting Laboratory 10.00 

Special Courses in Accountancy 2.00 

Stenography and Typewriting, each 20.00 

Surveying 5.00 

Drawing, if not in course ,.... 25.00 

Conditional Examination, on days assigned 1.00 

Conditional Examination, on other than assigned 

days 2.00 

Special Examination 5.00 

Graduation, final year only 15.00 

Duplicate Transcript of Record 1.00 

Fee for Late Registration 5.00 

ROOM RESERVATION 

The deposit of $10.00 for reservation of room is not 
returned in case of failure to occupy the room. 

This deposit is not applied to room rent but is re- 
tained to cover any damage beyond reasonable wear 
which may be done to the room or its furnishings while 
occupied by the students. The balance is returned to the 
parents at the end of the year. 

Rooms are equipped with shower bath and toilet, and 
are supplied with hot and cold water and all necessary 



CATALOGUE 19 



heavy furnishings. Students supply their own toilet linen, 
rugs and whatever decorations are appropriate. 

TREASURER'S REGULATIONS 

All bills are payable in advance at the beginning of 
each semester, namely, in September and February. All 
checks should be made payable to Spring Hill College and 
addressed directly to the Treasurer. 

As a special inducement to early registration and 
full payment in advance and with a view to co-operating 
with parents who wish to effect a saving, the following 
reductions are available on basic* fee only: 

A discount of 6 percent where payment for the 
YEAR is made in full prior to July 1. 

A discount of 4 percent where payment for the 
YEAR is made in full prior to August 1. 

A discount of 2 percent where payment for the 
YEAR is made before the end of the first week of classes. 

Special arrangements for any alternative plan of 
payments must be made before the opening of classes 
with the Treasurer. An interest charge of 5 percent will 
be added to accounts past due. 

A refund will be allowed only in case of serious 
sickness, necessitating absence from the College for a 
period of a month, and this refund will be only for board 
and lodging, but not for tuition and fees. As all con- 
tracts are made for semesters and not for shorter periods, 
late registration, dismissal and withdrawal are matters 
of serious inconvenience to the College. 

No money will ever be advanced for any purpose 
whatever by the Treasurer unless a sufficient initial de- 
posit has been made with him by the parents of the stu- 
dent. When parents desire the college to pay for cloth- 



20 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

ing, traveling, dental care, etc., they should make arrange- 
ments in advance with the Treasurer. 

Students' visitors who stay at the College will be 
charged for board and lodging at the rate of $2.00 per 
day. 

The medical fee includes attention by the staff phy- 
sician and ordinary nursing for a limited period. Spe- 
cial operations and hospital services are not covered by 
this fee. 

Books and stationery may be purchased at the 
college book store. 

The college will not be responsible for books, cloth- 
ing, jewelry or any other articles possessed by the student 
while in school or left by him at his departure. 

No student will be admitted to examinations or 
granted a degree until all indebtedness to the college is 
settled. 



CATALOGUE 21 



Admission 



CREDENTIALS 

The college requires for admission the satisfactory 
completion of a four-year course in a secondary school 
approved by a recognized accrediting agency or the 
equivalent of such a course. All candidates for admission 
to Freshman year must present fifteen units in accept- 
able subjects. A unit represents a year's study in any 
subject, constituting approximately a quarter of a full 
year's work. This definition of a unit takes the four- 
year high school as a basis and assumes that the length 
of the school year is from thirty-six to forty weeks, that 
a period is from forty-five to sixty minutes in length, and 
that the study is pursued for four or five periods a week. 

REQUIRED SUBJECTS FOR ADMISSION 

Of the 15 units presented for admission to Fresh- 
man class, not more than three may be commercial, in- 
dustrial, or vocational subjects. Specified units for all 
students are: English (3); History (1); Language (2). 
Candidates for the A. B. degree must present at entrance 
(or secure during Freshman and Sophomore years ( Lat- /~V ^ 

in (4). Candidates for the B. S.. degree must present 



Science (1), and Mathematics (B) . Candidates for the 
B. S. C. must present Book-keeping (1). 

METHODS OF ADMISSION 

Candidates are admitted either on certificate or by 
examination. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

Admission by certificate is granted applicants from 
all schools on the approved list of the Commission on 
Accredited Schools of the Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools of the Southern States and of other 
recognized accrediting agencies outside the territory em- 
braced by the Southern Association. 



22 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Blank forms of entrance certificates, which are to 
be used in every case, may be had on application to the 
Registrar. Certificates must be made out and signed by 
the Principal or other recognized officer of the school, 
and mailed by him directly to the Registrar. It is ex- 
pected that the Principal will not recommend all grad- 
uates, but only those whose ability, application and schol- 
arship are such that the school is willing to stand sponsor 
for their success in college. 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

Applicants who are not entitled to admission by cer- 
tificate must take examinations in the required entrance 
units. These examinations are held during the week pre- 
ceding the opening of classes. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students applying for admission from standard in- 
stitutions of collegiate rank will be given advanced stand- 
ing provided the credits of the institution are acceptable 
and sufficient to be considered equivalent to the work 
done in the corresponding classes at Spring Hill. 

Such candidates should present in advance of regis- 
tration : 

1. A certificate of honorable dismissal from the 
school last attended. 

2. An official transcript of college credits, with 
specifications of courses, year when taken, hours and 
grades. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Mature and earnest students, who either are lacking 
in the required units or wish to pursue particular studies 
without reference to graduation, may be admitted by the 
permission of the dean to such course of their own choice 
as they seem qualified to take. The work done by these 
students cannot be counted later on toward a degree at 
Spring Hill unless all entrance requirements have been 
satisfied. 



CATALOGUE 23 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

The conditions for the Baccalaureate degrees are the follow- 
ing: 

1. The satisfactory completion of the four year's course lead- O 
ing to the degree for which the student is a candidate. 

2. A written thesis approved by the Dean of the College and 
presented on or before April 1st of the year in which the degree i« 
to be conferred. 

3. In order to be accepted in fulfillment of any requirement >! 
for the degree, all work must be completed with a grade of D (70-75) 
or over, and the general average of the work must be of grade 
C (75-84) or above. > 

4. At the end of his Senior year the student must pass a 
comprehensive examination on the various courses offered as major 
and first minor. This requirement will be enforced for all students 
who register in or after September, 1933. 

5. The Senior year (or 24 of the last 30 credit hours) must 
be made at Spring Hill College. 

6. A graduation fee of fifteen dollars payable in advance, 
and the settlement of all indebtedness to the College. 

All applicants for a degree must file their applications and pre- 
sent all their credits and the evidence of having met all require- 
ments listed above, on or before the 1st of April. 

AMOUNT OF WORK 

The semester hour is the unit or standard for computing the 
amount of student's work. A semester hour is defined as one 1 
lecture, recitation or class exercise, one hour in length per week, 
for one semester. (Tw o hours of laboratory work are] equivalent 
to one recitation hour. Two hours of preparation on the part of 
the student is supposed for each lecture or recitation. ^^ /6 mm Jl 

Regular work for freshmen is £?&&£$ . hours per week. For all 
others it may be from fifteen to eighteen hours. No candidal 4ov 
% dagrfifi will be allowed to register for fewer than twelve hours 
of work. 

In cases of students of longer attendance, permission to take 
up eighteen hours a week is contingent upon the standing of the 
student. 



24 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

QUALITY POINTS 

A candidate for a degree must gain not only the number of 
credits required, but his work must reach a certain standard of 
excellence. In addition to the 128 hours credit necessary for grad- 
uation, each student must earn at least 128 quality points, or an 
average mark in all subjects of C or better. 

No student will be advanced to candidacy for any collegiate 
degree whose credit points do not equal his semester hours at the 
beginning or his last semester. 

For a grade of A (92-100), in a given course, a student will 
receive three times as many quality points as there are hour credits 
in that course; for a grade of B (85-91), twice as many quality 
points; for a grade of C (75-84), as many quality points as credit 
hours. For example: a three-hour course in which the student 
receives A gives 9 quality points, B. 6 quality points, and C merely 
three quality points. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Honors at graduation are granted on the basis of quality points 
in their ratio to the total number of credit hours carried. Thus, 
for example, a student who consistently made A (92-100) in all his 
subjects of a 128-hour program would have 384 quality points, for 
a quality quotient of 3. The honors to be inscribed on the di- 
plomas, read at Commencement, and published in the lists of grad- 
uates are awarded on the following scale: 

maxima cum laude for a quality quotient of 2.8; 

magna cum laude for a quality quotient of 2.5; 

cum laude, for a quality quotient of 2. 

Subject requirements 

1. Prescribed Subjects for the A. B. Degree: 

Credit Hours Credit Hours 

Latin 12 Logic 4 

Greek 12 Metaphysics 6 

(or Mathematics) 6 Psychology 4 

English 12 Ethics 8 

Modern Language 12 History of Philosophy 2 

Science 8 Religion 8 

Public Speaking 2 

History 6 



CATALOGUE 25 



2. Prescribed subjects for the B. S. Degree: 

Credit Hours Credit Hours 

Chemistry 8 Logic 4 

Mathematics - 14 Metaphysics 3 

English 12 Psychology 4 

Modern Language 12 Ethics 8 

History 6 Religion - 8 



3. Prescribed Subjects for the B.S. C. Degree: 

Credit Hours Credit Hours 

Accounting 12 Logic 4 

Economics 12 Metaphysics .3 

Mathematics 6 Psychology 4 

English 12 Ethics 8 

Business Administration 12 Religion ....8 

Modern Language 6 

4. Prescribed Subjects for Class B Secondary Professional 

Certificate. 

(Requirements of Alabama Department of Education, as of March 

1, 1935) 

Credit Hours Credit Hours 

English 12 Educational Psychology 3 

History 6 Principles of H. S. Teach- 

Social Sciences v .. 6 ing 3 

(Pol. Science, Sociology, Material & Methods (Major 

Economics) .Subject) - 3 

General Psychology 3 Mat. & Meth. (Minor) 3 

Practice Teaching ,_._... ..3 

Education (Elective) 6 

N. B. Students who registered prior to September, 1935, may 
graduate under the requirements specified in the Bulletin for 1934. 

In addition to the subjects prescribed above, it is understood 
that candidates for graduation must attend any course of lectures, 
or any other exercises, that have been or may be authorized by the 
Faculty, even though such courses yield no value in credits. 



26 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



POOR SCHOLARSHIP— DISMISSAL 

Failure or unremoved condition in 50% of his work in any 
semester renders a student liable to dismissal for poor scholarship. 
Exception to this rule is made only for weighty reasons. 

Low grades and neglect of work within the semester render 
a student liable to probation, including exclusion from extra-curri- 
cular activities; and failure to improve will entail reduction of 
schedule with a permanent record of failure in the subject canceled. 

A test in proficiency in English will be given all Juniors. Should 
any prove unsatisfactory they will be required to take a course in 
remedial English. Passing this course by the beginning of their 
last semester is a condition of graduation. 

MAJOR AND MINOR SEQUENCE 

There must be completed a Major Sequence of at least twenty- 
four hours in some subject (or at the discretion of the professor 
concerned and with the approval of the dean, in some closely related 
group of subjects) and a Minor Sequence of at least eighteen hours. 

A major may be changed only by the consent of the Dean and 
the heads of the departments concerned, and such change will be 
permitted only upon the distinct understanding that all the courses 
prescribed in the major finally chosen shall be completed before 
graduation. 

ELECTIVES 

Courses (a) not taken as prescribed courses, and (b) not in- 
cluded in the student's major and minor may be chosen as approved 
electives to complete the 128 credits required for graduation. 

The two years of Modern Language required for all degrees 
must be of strictly college level. Hence, students who are required 
to take an elementary language course, either for lack of two high 
school units in the modern language selected or because of in- 
ability to follow the Intermediate language course, will receive 
no college credit for such elementary courses. 

In the choice of electives, each student must be guided by his 
prospective future work. He must ascertain, moreover } that such 
courses are open to his class; that he has fulfilled the prerequisites, 
and that there will be no conflict in the schedule of recitations or 
laboratory periods. 

Electives for the second term must be filed by members of 
the upper classes with the dean on or before January 5, and for the 
first term on or before May 15. 



CATALOGUE 



27 



REFERENCE STUDY 



1. Students taking courses in Philosophy shall prepare and 
submit each month a paper of 2,000 words dealing with the devel- 
opment of some specific topic of the subject-matter treated in class. 

2. Students taking courses in Education, History and Social 
Sciences will be required to hand in two papers each semester. 
These papers are to contain not less than 1,800 words, and are to be 
based on the student's outside reading. 

3. All such and other prescribed written assignments will be 
held as prerequisites for graduation, for the fulfillment of which 
no student will be allowed any extension of time beyond April 1st 
of his Senior year. 



28 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Schedule of A. B. Course 



FRESHMAN 



CK 



First Semester — 

JLatin 3 hours 

Greek (or Mathematics) 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek (or Mathematics) 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science - .A hours 

Religion 1 hour 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek (or History) 3 hours 

English Literature 3 hours 

vJVtodern Language 3 hours 

(L/^ogic ...2 hours 

'Public Speaking 1 hour 

Religion 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

Latin 3 hours 

Greek (or History) .-.3 hours 

English Literature 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Logic 2 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Religion . 1 hour 



JUNIOR 



First Semester — 
General Metaphysics ...-3 hours 
History (or Lang.) ....3 hours 

Religion 1 hour 

Major or Minor Elect. ..9 hours 



Second Semester — 

Psychology .A hours 

History (or Lang.) ....3 hours 

Religion 1 hour 

Major or Minor Elect. ..8 hours 



SENIOR 



First Semester — 

Ethics 4 hours 

Religion 1 hour 

Special Metaphysics ....3 hours 
Major or Minor Elect. ..9 hours 



Second Semester — 

Ethics 4 hours 

Religion 1 hour 

History of Philosophy.. 2 hours 
Major or Minor Elect. ..8 hours 



CATALOGUE 



29 



Schedule of B. 3. Course 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester- 
English S hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Drawing 2 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

English 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Drawing 2 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester — 

Mathematics 4 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Logic 2 hours 

English Literature ...3 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

Mathematics 4 hours 

Science 4 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Logic 2 houi;s 

English Literature 3 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



JUNIOR 

First Semester — Second Semester — 

History 3 hours History 3 hours 

General Metaphysics ..3 hours Psychology 4 hours 

Religion 1 hour Religion 1 hour 

Maj. and Min. Elec. 8-10 hours Major and Minor Elec. 8 hours 

SENIOR 



First Semester — 

Ethics 4 hours 

Religion 1 hour 

Major and Min. Elec. 10 hours 



Second Semester — 

Ethics 4 hours 

Religion 1 hour 

Major and Min. Elec. 10 hours 



30 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Schedule of B. S. C. Course 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester — 

Accounting ...3 hours 

Economics - 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Business Mathematics 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

Accounting 3 hours 

Economics 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Business Mathematics 3 hours 

Modern Language .3 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester — 

Accounting 3 hours 

Economics 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Business Admin 3 hours 

Logic 2 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Religion 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

Accounting 3 hours 

Economics 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Business Admin. ..3 hours 

Logic 2 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Religion 1 hour 



JUNIOR 



First Semester — 
General Metaphysics ....3 hours 

Business Admin 3 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

Psychology 4 hours 

Business Admin 3 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



Major and Minor Elec. 9 hours Major and Minor Elec. 8 hours 



SENIOR 



First Semester — 

Ethics 4 hours 

Religion 1 hour 

Major and Min. Elec. 12 hours 



Second Semester — 

Ethics 4 hours 

Religion 1 hour 

Major and Min. Elec. 10 hours 



CATALOGUE 



31 



SCHEDULE OF ENGINEERING COURSE 



First Semester — 

Mathematics 

Language 

Chemistry 

Drawing 

English 

Religion 



First Semester — 

Mathematics 

Physics 

Descriptive Geometry 

English 

Language 

Religion 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester — 
3 hours Mathematics .— 3 hours 

3 hours Language 3 hours 

4 hours Chemistry 4 hours 

4 hours Drawing 2 hours 

3 hours Descriptive Geometry.. 2 hours 
1 hour English 3 hours 

Religion 1 hour 

SOPHOMORE 

Second Semester — 

4 hours Mathematics 4 hours 

4 hours Physics 4 hours 

4 hours Drawing 4 hours 

3 hours English 3 hours 

3 hours Language 3 hours 

1 hour Religion 1 hour 



SCHEDULE OF PRE-LEGAL COURSE 



First Semester — 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Political Science 3 hours 

Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



FRESHMAN 

Second Semester — 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Political Science 3 hours 

Language 3 hours 

Science 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



SOPHOMORE 



First Semester — 

History 3 hours 

Language 3 hours 

Logic 2 hours 

Sociology 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Religion 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

History 3 hours 

Language 3 hours 

Logic 2 hours 

Sociology 3 hours 

English 3 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Religion 1 hour 



32 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Schedule of Pre-Medical Courses 



Two- Year Pre-Medical Course 1 

FIRST YEAR 



First Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry .. 4 hours 
2 Modern Language .... 3 hours 

English -. 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



First Semester — 
Comparative Anatomy 4 hours 
Organic Chemistry .... 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Physics 4 hours 

2 Modern Language .... 3 hours 
Religion 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

General Biology 4 

Inorganic Chemistry .. 4 
2 Modern Language .... 3 

English 3 

Mathematics 3 

Religion ..1 

SECOND YEAR 

Second Semester — 

Quantitative Chem. .. 4 
Organic Chemistry .... 4 

English 3 

Physics 4 

2 Modern Language .... 3 
Religion .1 



hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hour 



hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hour 



Three-Year Pre-Medical Course 

FIRST YEAR 

Same as two-year course 

SECOND YEAR 



First Semester — 
Quantitive Chemistry ..4 hours 

Physics 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

2 Modern Language .... 3 hours 

Logic 2 hours 

Public Speaking 1 hour 

Religion 1 hour 



Second Semester — 
Quantitive Chemistry ..4 

Physics 4 

English 3 

2 Modern Language .... 3 

Logic 2 

Public Speaking 1 

Religion 1 

THIRD YEAR 

Second Semester — 
Vertebrate Embryology 4 

Organic Chemistry 4 

Psychology 4 

History 3 

Electives 3 

Religion 1 



First Semester — 
Comparative Anatomy 4 hours 

Organic Chemistry 4 hours 

Gen. Metaphysics 3 hours 

History 3 hours 

Mathematics 3 hours 

Religion 1 hour 

ICf. Remarks on Pre-Medical Course. 

2 0nly French or German will be accepted for the B 
Biology. 



hours 

hours 

hours 

hours 

hours 

hour 

hour 



hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hours 
hour 

S. in 



CATALOGUE 



33 



Four-Year Pre-Medical Course 



Leading to the B. S. Degree with a Major in Biology 
The First, Second and Third Years are the same as in the 
Three-Year Pre-Medica) Course. 

FOURTH YEAR 



First Semester — 
Intro, to Gen. Physi. 4 hours 

Ethics 4 hours 

Physical Chemistry 4 hours 

Electives 4 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

General Physiology ...A hours 

Ethics 4 hours 

Physical Chemistry 4 hours 

Electives 4 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



Schedule of Pre-Denta! Course 

FIRST YEAR 



First Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry ...A hours 

English 3 hours 

Modern Language ..3 hours 

Physics* ---. 4 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

General Biology 4 hours 

Inorganic Chemistry ...A hours 

English 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Physics* 3 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



SECOND YEAR 



First Semester — 
Comparative Anatomy 4 hours 

Organic Chemistry 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Physics .A hours 

Religion 1 hour 



Second Semester — 

Quantitive Chemistry ....4 hours 

Organic Chemistry 4 hours 

English 3 hours 

Modern Language 3 hours 

Physics ...4 hours 

Religion 1 hour 



* Dental Schools accept High School Physics for credit but 
College Physics is highly recommended. If two years of Pre- 
Dental work be taken Physics should be taken in the second year. 
If Physics is not taken some mathemetics or history should be sub- 
stituted for it. 



34 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Remarks on Regular Courses 

The A.B. Course. 

This course is unexcelled as a preparation for a profession and 
for general culture. By a proper choice of electives, a student 
may include in his schedule Pre-Legal, Pre-Medical or Engineering 
studies, and thus be able to obtain his A. B. Degree with all the 
requirements for entrance into a professional school in four years. 

The Major and related Minor in this course will be selected 
from Languages, Philosophy, English and Social Sciences. 

The B.S. Course. 

The object of this course is to prepare students for a career 
in some technical profession. Those who finish this course are 
entitled to advanced standing in the university courses, and thus 
they are enabled to obtain their B.S. Degree and make their pro- 
fessional studies in the least possible time. Students in this course 
may cover all the Pre-Medical or Pre-Legal requirements. In the 
B. S. course more time is devoted to Sciences, and Modern Lan- 
guages take the place of the Classics. 

The Major in this course must be Chemistry or Biology. A 
Minor must be another Science, or Mathematics. 

The B. S. in Commerce Course. 

This course is designed to meet the demands of those who 
wish to combine a cultural education with the technical courses 
required for a business career. It embraces such subjects as Ac- 
counting, Commercial Law, Economics, Banking, Marketing, Pro- 
duction, Finance, English, Mathematics, and Modern Language, 
but also affords an opportunity for courses in History and Schol- 
astic Philosophy. 

The Major and related Minor in this course must be selected 
from Accounting, Economics, Business Administration. 

A two-year course in business subjects will be arranged for 
those who do not wish to take the four-year course. 

The Engineering Course. 

This course is practically the same as the first two years of 
the B.S. course. It embraces the subjects that are generally 
required as the foundation of all technical engineering courses. 

The Pre-Legal Course. 

The best preparation for entering upon the study of law is 
a four-year course leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or 



CATALOGUE 35 



Bachelor of Science. However, those wishing to take a two-year 
course, which will afterward be counted toward a degree, should 
communicate with the institution at which they intend to make 
their law studies to find out what it advises as a Pre-Legal course. 
In general, any two years of a standard course leading to degrees 
answer the purpose of a Pre-Legal course. 

The Pre-Medicai Course. 

Because of the large number of applicants for medical edu- 
cation in recent years and the continual raising of standards by 
medical schools, pre-medical students are strongly urged to take 
the full four years of college work in preparation for the study of 
medicine. With this in view a four-year pre-medical course leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in biology has 
been scheduled and is recommended for those who intend to study 
medicine. Several medical schools are now requiring a bachelor's 
degree for entrance. 

For those who do not wish to spend this much time in pre- 
medical preparation the three-year pre-medical course above out- 
lined is offered. Most medical schools now are either requiring 
three years of pre-medical work or so many credit hours that the 
work can hardly be done in less than three years. 

Finally, for those who are satisfied to meet only the minimum 
requirements of some medical schools, the two-year pre-medical 
course is obligatory. They should understand from the beginning, 
however, that this course is not accepted by many medical schools 
and that those schools which do accept it regularly require higher 
than average grades from applicants. 

All pre-medical students are expected to take the Medical Apti- 
tude Test administered every year by the Association of American 
Medical Colleges and demanded for admission by many medical 
schools. 



The Pre-Dental Course. 

Only one year of pre-dental preparation is required by most 
dental schools but a second year would be very profitable. The 
courses outlined above meet the requirements of all dental schools. 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



SUBJECTS IN COURSE 

The Faculty reserves the right to refuse to offer a 
course listed below for which there is not a sufficient 
number of applicants. 



,**_ 




BIOLOGY j d & 

LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

101-102. General Biology. 

An introductory course consisting of an outline of the physical 
structure and chemical composition of protoplasm and the cell, 
the morphology and physiology of plant and invertebrate animal 
types. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

Given^YP.ry year. ^— — ^^_^ - _— — - 

201. Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. 

A comparative study of type forms with special reference to 
Analogy and Homology. Prerequisite Biology 101-102. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
One semester. Four hours credit. 

Given in 1933-'34; to be given in 1934-'35. 



103. Genetics. 

A survey course of the facts and theories of heredity and vari- 
ation. Prerequisite; Biology 101 or equivalent. 
Lectures two hours per week. 

One semester. Two hours credit. 

Given in 1933-'34; to be given in 1935. 

201. Comparative Anatomy of the Vertebrates. 

A comparative study of type forms with special reference to 
analogy and homology. Prerequisite: Biology 101-102. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory six hours per week 
One semester Four hours credit 

Given every year 



CATALOGUE 37 



UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

These courses are intended primarily for students majoring 
in biology and are open for credit ordinarily only to Juniors and 
Seniors. 

301. Vertebrate Embryology. 

A study of gametogenesis, fertiliziation, cleavage, gastrulation 
and later development of typical vertebrate forms. Prerequisites: 
Biology 101-102 and 201. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester Four hours credit. 

Given in 1935; to be given in 1937. 

302. Histology. 

A study of cells, tissues and organ structure. Prerequisites: 
Biology 101-102, 201 and 301. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
One semester Four hours credit. 

Given in 1933; to be given in 1936. 

303. Microscopic Technique. ' 

A laboratory course in methods of preparing tissues for micro- 
scopic study. Prerequisites: Biology 101-102, 201, 301 and Chem- 
istry 301. 

Time to be arranged. Two hours credit. 

Given in 1934. 

401. Introduction To General Physiology. 

A study of matter and energy in relation to living things; solu- 
tions; diffusion and osmotic pressure; the physico-chemical struc- 
ture of protoplasm. Prerequisites: Biology 101-102, 201, 301 and 
Chemistry 101-102, 203-204. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

Given in 1934; to be given in 1936. 

402. General Physiology. 

The fundamental life processes of organisms from a general 
and comparative viewpoint. Prerequisites: Biology 401 and Chem- 
istry 203-4, 301, 305-6. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

To be given in 1937. 

403. Introduction to Research. 

Special work for advanced students and preparation of thesis. 

Credit to be arranged. 



38 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

XL.. J^ts 

101. General Inorganic Chemistry. 

This course is intended to familiarize the student with the fun- 
damental principles of chemical theory. The principles are devel- 
oped and driven home by illustrations, exercises and problems. 
Since the chemistry of the laboratory is the true chemistry, the 
whole course is arranged about it and is made to carry the thread 
of the subject. Four hours credit. 

102. Elementary Qualitative Analysis. 

In this course an endeavor is made to impress upon the student 
the principles involved, and to enable him to classify chemical phe- 
nomena, avoiding mere thoughtless manipulation. Special emphasis 
is laid on the development of the ionic theory and theories of 
solution. Four hour;? credit. 

202. Quantitative Analysis. 

This course includes and emphasizes the elements of volumetric 
analysis with typical analytical methods. The laboratory work is 
supplemented by conferences and quizzes, the important principles 
of stoichiometry being especially emphasized. Four hours credit. 

203-4. Organic Chemistry. 

The principles of Organic Chemistry and its relation to Gen- 
eral Chemistry are emphasized. Typical organic compounds are 
studied, and their constitution is discussed at some length. General 
reactions and characteristics are discussed, and many applications 
of Organic Chemistry to practical life are given. 

Eight hours credit. 
301-2. Physical Chemistry. 

This course is intended to familiarize intending students of 
Medicine and Engineering with the fundamental principles of Chemical 
Theory. The structure of matter, thermodynamics and electrochem- 
istry, are treated as fully as possible. Laboratory work includes the 
different methods of molecular weight determination, electrical con- 
ductance and the determination of Hydrogen-ion concentration, 
colorimetrically and electrometrically. 

Four hours credit. 

303-4. Quantitative Analysis. 

A brief course in the elements of quantitative analysis stressing 
gravimetric determinations of iron, sulphur and chlorine to enable 
the student to acquire speed, accuracy and confidence. Volumetric 
analysis is then taken up with emphasis being placed on commercial 
products and practical methods as determined in a modern industrial 
laboratory. Eight hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 39 



305-6. — Physiological Chemistry. 

An elementary course dealing with the Chemistry of the Carbo- 
hydrates, fats and proteins. The chemical basis underlying the phe- 
nomena of metabolism; enzymes, absorption and digestion are dis- 
cussed. 

Eight hours credit. 

N. B. Chemistry 101, 102, 301, 302 are required of Engineering 
students. 

Chemistry 201, 204, 303, 304 are recommended for Engi- 
neering students. 
Chemistry 101, 102, 203 and 204 are required of Pre-Medi- 

cal students. 
Chemistry 301 and 202 are recommended for Pre-Medical 
students and required by many medical schools. 
COMMERCE 
The three subjects from which candidates for the B. S. C. 
Degree must select their Major and related Minor are Account- 
ing, Business Administration and Economics. Courses offered in 
these fields are here listed. 

ACCOUNTING ^w. J^X 

Commerce 1. Bookkeeping and Accounting. 

The bookkeeping equation applied to accounts; increases and 
decreases in proprietorship; journal and journalizing; the ledger; 
posting, and the trial balance; the work sheet, the balance sheet, 
and the profit and loss statement; adjusting and closing the ledger; 
special journals. 

No college credit. 

103. Principles of Business. 

Forms of business enterprise; financing, management; wages 
and wage systems; the control of labor; purchasing; selling; adver- 
tising; traffic; foreign trade and ocean traffic; credit; forecast- 
ing business condition; banking; exchange; insurance; principles 
of accounting; financial statements; cost accounting; investments; 
causes of business failures and remedies. 

Three hours credit. 

Commerce 111-112. Principles of Accounting. 

Meaning and purpose of accounting; the balance sheet; state- 
ment or profit and loss; accounts; construction of asset and 
proprietorship accounts; accounts with customers and creditors; 
adjusting and closing entries; books of original entry; controlling 
accounts; accruals and deferred items; partnerships; opening and 
closing corporation books. Six hours credit. 



40 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Commerce 211-212. Advanced Accounting. 

An advanced study in accounting theory and practice. Profits; 
statements at the end of the accounting period; partnerships; cor- 
porations; installment sales; agencies and branches; consignments; 
venture accounts; accounting for insolvent concerns and statement 
of affairs. Six hours credit. 

Commerce 311. Accounting Systems. 

Study of reorganization in the form of consolidations, merg- 
ers, holdings companies, and trusts; description and explanation 
of the various accounting forms, books, records, methods and sys- 
tems employed by various types of business. Three hours credit. 

Commerce 312. Auditing and C. P. A. Problems. 

Qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the public auditor; 
exact rules covering every detail of making an audit of books and 
records of representative business concerns; methods of securing 
and handling engagements; working papers and audit reports; 
C. P. A. problems of an advanced nature presented and analyzed. 

Three hours credit. 

Commerce 411. Cost Accounting. 

The need and value of cost accounting; classifications of cost; 
process cost systems and specific order cost systems; manufac- 
turing expense theory; accounting for material; accounting for labor 
costs; distribution of costs; debatable methods; relative values; 
establishment and uses of standard costs. 

Three hours credit. 

Commerce 412. Income Tax Procedure. 

Revenue Act of 1934; returns for individuals; gross income; 
exempt income; deductions from gross income; computation of 
taxes; income tax procedure; returns for corporations; computation 
for corporation taxes; supplementary problems. 

Three hours credit. 

Commerce 490. Preparations for the C. P. A. Certificate. 

Questions and problems based on examination given by the 
American Institute of Accountants. Individual instruction given. 

Examinations for the certificate of Certified Public Account- 
ant are held in Montgomery twice a year, in May and November. 
Applications may be made to the Secretary of State. 

No college credit. 



CATALOGUE 41 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 777/?/ 

Commerce 221-222. Business Law. 

Law in general, its definition, origin and sources; written and 
unwritten law; law and equity; contracts defined and classified; 
origin of property; title to personal property; mortgages and their 
uses. Six hours credit. 







ft/0^ Frin 



E-302. Corporation Finance. 

rinciples of financing; forms of business enterprises; the 
corporate form and its status before the law; owned and borrowed 
capital; basis of capitalization; sources of capital funds; disposi- 
tion of gross earning; budgets; reorganization. 

Six hours credit. 

Commerce 322. Banking. 

Brief history of origin and development of banking; early 
banks and banking systems of United States; operation of the Fed- 
eral Reserve System; foreign banking systems; classes of credit 
and credit instruments; money, credit and prices; international 
exchange. Three hours credit. 

Commerce 402. Business and Office Administration. 

Methods of organizing and controlling the work of industrial 
establishments; selection of plant site; nearness to raw materials and 
to market; available labor supply; power and transportation; profit 
sharing; types of internal organization; office administration; per- 
sonnel; standards and records. Three hours credit. 

Commerce 421. Advertising and Saleemanship. 

The specific purpose of advertising; the copy; slogans; trade- 
marks; newspapers; magazines; advertising research; preparing and 
making the sales presentation; overcoming objections and closing 
the sale; sales promotion. Three hours credit. 

Commerce 431. Insurance. 

Underlying principles, important practices and principal legal 
phases of life, fire, marine, employers' liability, fidelity, corporate 
surety, title, and credit insurance; state regulation of companies; 
underwriters' associations and their work. Three hours credit. 

Commerce 441. Real Estate. 

What real estate is; the origin and development of real estate 
ownership; practical discussion of the details involved in the con- 
duct of transactions of real estate activity. Three hours credit. 



faUL jfar<- Sk-ryryJ^ 




42 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Commerce 442. Investments. 

A study of the underlying principles of investment credit; ele- 
ments of sound investment and methods of computing net earnings, 
amortization, rights and convertibles; the investment policies of 
individuals and institutions; the investment market and its rela- 
tion to the money market. Three hours credit. 

ECONOMICS '^ >»^6*^ 
Commerce 101-E. Economic Geography. 

A comprehensive survey of man's utilization of the earth in 
making a living; a study of the world's major regions and of their 
present and potential production of food and raw materials for 
manufacture. Special attention will be devoted to the South in 
general and to Alabama in particular. 

Three hours credit. 

Commerce 102-E. Economic History of the United States. 

The economic development of the United States from the 
period of settlement to the present time; origin and growth of lead- 
ing American industries; changes in industrial organization; com- 
mercial policies; influence of economic conditions on political 
history; problems of expansion. Three hours credit. 

Commerce 201-E-202-E. Principles of Economics. 

An analysis of production, distribution, and consumption; 
theories concerning rents, profits, interest and wages. A discussion 
of proposed remedies for inequality of distribution of wealth; 
single tax, government ownership, profit-sharing, co-operative 
enterprises. 

Six hours credit. 

Commerce 321-E. Public Finance. 

The evolution of securities; organized security markets and 
their economic functions; origin, development, purpose, and oper- 
ation of the New York Stock Exchange; the dangers and benefits 
of stock speculation;- floor trader; specialist; odd-lot business; secur- 
ity deliveries, loans and transfers; the stock exchange and American 
business. 

Three hours credit. 

Commerce 331-E. Transportation Principles. 

Relation of transportation to industry and society; develop- 
ment and present status of American transportation systems; 
organization of transportation service; rates and regulations. 

Three hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 43 



Commerce 332-E. Foreign Trade. 

Principles of international distribution; development of export 
markets; export and import machinery; trade regulation. 

Three hours credit. 

Commerce 401-E. Elements of Statistics. 

An introduction to statistics; a brief consideration of statistical 
theory; collection, classification and presentation of economic data; 
construction of graphs and charts; study of index numbers; prob- 
lems of statistical research. 

Three hours credit. 

Commerce 422-E. Principles of Marketing. 

The marketing functions; marketing farm products; marketing 
raw materials; marketing manufactured products; distribution 
through brokers, jobbers, wholesalers, commission houses; market 
finance; market risk; market news; standardization; market price; 
the cost of marketing. 

Three hours credit. 

Commerce 432-E. Public Utilities. 

Characteristics of public utilities; regulation by franchises and 
commissions; valuation; rate of return; rate structures; regulation 
of service, accounts and reports; public relations; public owner- 
ship. 

Three hours credit. 

DRAW.NG p^ ^^ 

101-2. Mechanical Drawing. 

Lettering, tracing, blue-printing, geometrical construction, 
orthographic and oblique projection, exercises in drawing to scale, 
intersections and development of surfaces. Working drawings of 
machine parts and of complete machines and structures, dimension- 
ing, line-shading. One Semester and a half. Six hours credit. 

106-201. — Descriptive Geometry. 

A critical study of the science of drawing. The location of 
points, lines, planes; single-curved surfaces; surfaces of revolution 
and warped surfaces, with their relations to each other; tangent lines 
and planes; intersection of surfaces; shades and shadows. One se- 
mester and a half. Prerequisite, Solid Geometry. Six hours credit. 
205. Topographical Drawing. 
Shades and shadows, representation of surface forms by contours 
and by shading with pencil, pen and colors. Topographical symbols, 
copying, enlarging and reducing maps. Two hours credit. 



44 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

202. Machine Drawing. 

Free-hand and mechanical drawing of machine parts and com- 
plete machines, piping plans, etc., with problems in mechanism and 
in machine design. Four hours credit. 

103-4. Anatomical Drawing. 

An elective course for pre-medical students, calculated to im- 
print graphically upon the mind an accurate theoretical knowledge 
of the construction of the human body. The skeleton, nervous sys- 
tem and various organs form the basis of study. 

Four hours credit. 

ECONOMICS 

Courses as outlined under Department of Commerce. 

EDUCATION ^ "^ rys ~ 

Education 301. History of Education in the U. S. 

This course begins with a study of the origin and development 
of the various school systems, denominational and public, in the 
United States, section by section. It then takes up the advance- 
ment made in elementary, secondary and higher education. The 
treatment of such topics as professional education, technical and 
agricultural education, the preparation of teachers, art and manual 
education, commercial education, educational extension, profession- 
al societies, regional and national educational associations is in- 
cluded in the course. Three hours -credit. 

Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Education 308E. Educational Psychology. 

This course considers the nature, function and measurement of 
the original tendencies of the individual, and the modifications of 
them which the school endeavors to bring about. That this purpose 
may be better effected, the student is directed in the study of the 
laws of learning, the learning curve, the efficiency and permanence 
of learning, transfer of training, the result of exercise, the meas- 
urement of achievement, the use of tests, the new type examina- 
tions. Three hours credit. 

Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Education 335. Principles of Secondary Education. 

This course studies the individual at the stage of his secondary 
Education, his native and acquired tendencies to action, and deduces 
principles by which the teacher may be guided in his attempt to 
direct the interest and secure the attention of the pupil. Among 



CATALOGUE 45 



the topics considered are: the aims in instruction, the class exercise; 
the essentials of good questioning, the modes of instruction; the 
importance of study; the prelection or assignment; the repetition or 
recitation; standards and measurements; the individual and social 
elements in secondary instruction. Three hours credit. 

To be given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Education 336. Principles of High School Teaching . 

The purpose of this course is to give the student of education 
the proper concept of the present day high school. While course 
335 deals with the essentials of technique for the apprentice teacher, 
course 336 discusses some of the procedures which go to make up 
the professional skill of the master teacher. Among these are sup- 
ervision of pupil study, teaching how to study, the technique of vis- 
ual instruction, socialized class procedure, project teaching and the 
adjustment of instruction to the varying abilities of the pupil. 

To be given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Education 435-436T. Observation and Practice Teaching. 

One and one-half or Two Semester Hours each Session. Sched- 
ule to be arranged by each student individually with the head of the 
department of education. 

In order to supplement its instruction in educational principles, 
aims, methods, curricula and procedure, and to cultivate professional 
skill in teaching, Spring Hill College has secured the cooperation of 
the Spring Hill High School. Through the courtesy of its adminis- 
trators and teachers, Spring Hill High School thus becomes the 
proving ground for the professional students of the department of 
education, who have free access to its classrooms for observation of 
the methods practiced therein and for supervised practice teach- 
ing. Cooperating with the State Department of Education, Spring 
Hill College requires that its candidates for degrees with a major in 
education present a minimum of 3 semester hours in observation 
and practice teaching with a minimum of N 30 full periods of class 
teaching. Three hours credit. 

Given every year. 

Education M. Materials and Methods of High School Teaching. 

The object of this course is to give the student an intimate 
knowledge of the reason, aim and material of the chief subjects 
found in the high school curricula, and the recognized methods by 
which they are taught. The student should emerge from the course 
with a correct perspective of the subject studied and with such a 
comprehensive view of its proper distribution that he should be ca- 
pable of constructing in it a satisfactory curriculum. 

Three hours credit. 



46 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Education 335X. Extra-curricular Activities. 

The purpose of this course is to instruct the students of edu< 
cation in the importance of student participation in school activities 
outside the classroom. Considerable time is devoted to the theory 
and practice of the teaching of athletic sports, football, baseball, 
basketball, track sports and boxing. The fundamental principles of 
various football systems, rules, training, special plays are among 
the topics dealt with. There is explicit insistence upon the transfer 
of training in punctuality, promptitude in the execution of plays 
and other desirable qualities from the field of play to the regular 
work of the school and of after life. Among other student activi- 
ties discussed, are the following: student council, class organization; 
club, the poetry club, the dramatic club, the literary society, the 
debating society; musical organizations — the choir, the glee club 
the band , the orchestra; the assembly; the commencement; the li- 
brary; the study hall; the athletic association; school publications — 
the annual,. th« school magazine; publicity and public relations. 

Three hours credit. 
Given every year. 

Education 462M. Materials and Methods of Teaching! English. 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Education 466M. Materials and Methods of Teaching History. 

Three hours credit. 
To be given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Education 469BM. Materials and Methods of Teaching Biology 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Education 469PM. Materials and Methods of Teaching Physics. 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Education 470CM. Materials and Methods of Teaching- Chem. 
istry. 

Three hours credit. 
To be given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

Education 472M. Materials and Methods of Teaching French. 

Three hours credit. 
To be given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 



CATALOGUE 47 



Education 475M. Materials and Methods of Teaching Latin. 

Three hours credit. 
To be given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 
Education 477M. Materials and Methods of Teaching Spanish. 

Three hours credit. 
To be given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 
Education 494M. Materials and Methods of Teaching Physi- 
cal Education. 

Three hours credit. 
Given every year. 

ENGLISH ^ V^ 7 *^ 

1. Grammar and Composition. 

A course in the essentials of grammar and in the various modes 
of composition. Required of Freshman students who are deficient 
in the theory or practice of correct English. No credit. 

A course in the theory of rhetoric and the study of style based 
on reading, analysis and discussion of works of English prose au- 
thors. Insistence on the principles of literature and frequent prac- 
tice in composition. Required of Freshmen, unless excused by 
examination. Six hours credit. 

103. Poetry. 

A course in the study of the nature and elements of poetry, 
principles of versification, its various kinds, etc. Reading, analysis 
and appreciation of the chief poets, partly in class study, partly in 
assignments. Frequent practice in composition. 

Three hours credit. 

104. Types of English Prose. 

A study of the chief forms, of prose writing, narrative and ex- 
pository. Required readings in the short story and the essay with 
class discussions and frequent exercises in composition. 

Three hours credit. 

201-2. Survey of English Literature. 

A study of the historical background of the chief masterpieces 
of English literature from Beowulf to Thomas Hardy. Readings 
in the principal authors and critical papers at weekly intervals. 

Required of all Sophomores. Six hours credit. 

203. The Short Story. 

This course will study the rise and development of the Short 
Story from earliest times up to the present. While stories of other 
literatures will be carefully discussed, special attention will be di- 



pV**-^ 



48 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

rected to the American short story. Students will be required to 
analyze various short stories, and to write at least one original 
short story. Three hours credit. 

204. The Drama. 

The theory of the drama will be studied by means of lectures 
and assignments in its history and development; reading, analysis 
and study of works of principal English dramatists, especially 
Shakespeare; composition in dialogue, dramatic sketches, playlets, 
and at least one complete drama will be required. 

Three hours credit. 

301. The English Novel. 

The principal purpose of this course is to study the technique 
of the novel and the various schools of fiction and fheir tendencies 
with special attention to their ethical and literary value. Reading 
and discussion of noted novels. Three hours credit. 

302. Shakespeare. 

Shakespeare's life, influence, sources of his drama; an acquaint 
tance by reading and assignments with the Shakespearean literature 
of criticism ; reading, analysis and study of Shakespeare's plays, 
especially in comparison with those of other dramatists. 

Three hours credit. 

303. Aesthetics and Literary Criticism. 

The philosophical basis of aesthetics, the elements of taste; the 
theory of criticism; a survey of critical standards; a study of the 
schools of criticism and of the work of the chief literary critics. 
Critical papers on assigned subjects will be required. 

Three hours credit. 

304. Newman. 

A study of the Present Position of Catholics in England, 
Idea of a University, Apologia pro Vita Sua with detailed analysis 
of thought and examination of literary merits. 

Required of all majors in English. Three hours credit. 

309. English Literature. From Beowulf to 1500. A series of 
lectures on Old English and Middle English Literature. Among the 
authors studied will be such as Caedmon, Bede, Alfred the Great, 
Aelfric and Chaucer. Attention will be also directed to a study of 
the early ballads and lyrics. Based on James McCallum's The Be- 
ginnings to 1500. (Scribner's English Literature Series.) 

Three hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 49 



310. English Literature. The Renaissance. The student will 
have an opportunity in this course to study such great writers as Sir 
Thomas Wyatt, Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, Sir Philip Sidney 
and Edmund Spenser. In this course the plays of Marlowe and 
Shakespeare will be especially stressed. Based on Robert Whitney 
BolwelFs, The Renaissance. (Scribner's English Literature Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

311. English Literature. The Seventeenth Century. This 
course will include a careful survey of the Puritan Age and that of the 
Restoration. Milton's Paradise Lost and Dryden's Hind and the 
Panther will be carefully studied and discussed. Based on Evert 
Mordecai Clark's The Seventeenth Century. (Scribner's English 
Literature Series.) Three hours credit. 

312. English Literature. The Eighteenth Century. In this 
course lectures will be given on Daniel Defoe, Addison and Steele, 
Alexander Pope and his circle, with a thorough study of the social 
and religious backgrounds of the period. Based on Joseph P. Blick- 
ensderfer's the Eighteenth Century. (Scribner's English Literature 
Series.) Three hours credit. 

313. English Literature. 

The Romantic Period. This important period in the develop- 
ment of English poetry and aesthetic ideals will be studied with a 
view to the appreciation of its historical and religious background. 
Bernbaum's Guide Through the Romantic Movement will be used 
and wide reading required in Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, 
Shelley, Lamb, Hazlitt, and De Quincey. Three hours credit. 

FRENCH 

1. Elementary French. The rudiments of grammar, includ- 
ing the inflection of the regular and more common irregular verbs; 
the order of words in the sentence; colloquial exercises; easy themes; 
conversation. 

First semester. No college credit. 

2. Elementary French (Continued). Mastery of irregular 
verb forms; use of the conditional and subjunctive; syntax; colloquial 
exercises; themes; conversation; reading of graduated texts. 

Second semester. No college credit. 

Text: Xavier de Maistre. 

101. Intermediate French. Grammar review, with special at- 
tention to problems in syntax; reading of graduated texts; conversa- 
tion; prose composition; letter writing; dictation, essays. 

Three hours credit. 

Texts: Chateaubriand, Maistre; Danemarie. 



IWAk 



na/J^<^ 




* 



50 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

102. Intermediate French (Continued). Reading of graduated 
texts; conversation; prose composition; letter writing; dictation; 
detailed written abstracts of texts read; essays. 

Three hours credit. 

Texts: Merimee, Loti, Halevy, La Brette. 

201. Advanced French. Grammar review with special atten- 
i I tion to problems in syntax; reading of graduated texts; conversation; 

letter- writing; dictation; grammar and composition based on a French 
" J ^y' Jtext; abstracts of texts read; essays. 

pr**^^''\ Three hours credit. 

Texts: Moliere, Racine. 

202. Advanced French (Continued). Reading of graduated 
texts; conversation; letter writing; dictation; grammar and compo- 
sition based on a French text; abstracts of texts read; essays com- 
posed in French. Three hours credit. 

Texts: Corneille, Musset, Loti, Bordeaux. 

301-2. — The French Novel. A study of different types of the 
French novel: classical, romantic, realistic, contemporary, with 
reference to theme, characters, treatment and style. 

Six hours credit. 

303. The French Drama. The reading of dramas chosen from 
such authors as Corneille, Moliere, Racine, together with a study 
of their lives and works. Three hours credit. 



GERMAN 

1. Elementary German. 

This course is intended for students who have not presented 
German for admission. Grammar, pronunciation, colloquial exer- 
cises, German prose composition, easy themes, translation from prose 
selections, word formation, simple conversational exercises in Ger- 
man. Reading aloud and hearing the language read. 

No college credit. 

2. Elementary German (Continued.) 

Weak and strong verbs, the use of the modal auxiliaries; the 
chief rules of syntax and word-order; selections in prose and verse; 
dictation based upon the readings; frequent short themes; conversa- 
tion. 

No college credit. 



CATALOGUE 5] 



101. Intermediate German. 

Rapid review of grammar; conversation; dictation; prose composi- 
tion. Study of representative German literary masterpieces. Read- 
ing of typical short-stories, portraying modern German life and 
ideals. 

Three hours credit. 

102. Intermediate German (Continued.) 

General survey of German literature from its beginning to the 
present time. Reading of selected texts, and themes based upon the 
reading. 

Three hours credit. 

201. German Prose Writers. 

History of German literature, assigned readings and reports. 
The study of novels or short stories by German prose writers; Frey- 
tag, Novalis, Brentano, Eichendorff. 

Three hours credit. 

202. German Poetry. 

Readings from German ballads and lyrics. 

Three hours credit. 

301-2. The German Epic. 

Dreizehnlinden, Weber; Der Trumpeter von Sakkingen, Scheffel; 
selections from other epic poems. Six hours credit. 



GREEK 

1. For Beginners. 

Grammar and Composition. Xenophon, Anabasis, I. Required 
of those who do not offer Greek for entrance. 

Three hours a week for one semester. 

2. Xenophon. 

Anabasis, II-III; New Testament, St. Luke's Gospel; Grammar 
and Composition. Required of those who do not offer Greek for 
entrance. Three hours a week for one semester. 

101. Homer. 

The Iliad, I-IV, selections; or Odyssey, selections. Euripide3. 
Iphigenia in Aulis, Medea, Hecuba; Aristophanes, Clouds. Sight 
reading; Xenophon, Cyropaedia. Grammar and composition based 
on Arnold. Three hours credit. 



52 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

102. Homer. 

The Odyssey, selections; Theocritus, selections; Pindar, Olym- 
pic Odes, selected; sight reading, New Testament, selections. Gram- 
mar review and composition based on Arnold. 

Three hours credit. 

201. Demosthenes. 

On the Crown; selections from St. John Chrysostom and St. 
Basil; studies and oratorical analysis. Grammar review and com- 
position based on Arnold. Three hours credit. 

202. Demosthenes. Aeschylus. 

Demosthenes, Philippics or Olynthiacs; oratorical analysis; 
Aeschylus Agammemnon. Grammar review and composition based 
on Arnold. Three hours credit. 

301. Plato. 

Crito, Phaedo. Apology. Three hours credit. 

302. Herodotus, Thucydides. 

Herodotus, selections from Books I-IV. ; Thucydides, selections 
from the Sicilian expedition. Three hours credit. 

401. Sophocles. 

Antigone, Oedipus Tyrannus, Oedipus Coloneus. 

Three hours credit. 

402. Aristophanes. 

The Wasps, the Birds, the Frogs. Three hours credit. 



HISTORY 

101. Early Medieval History. 

Migration of Nations. The Islam, the Franks, the Lombards, 
and the Holy See. Church and State. The Carolingians. The 
Northmen in Europe. The Making of Germany and the R ; se of the 
Empire. Lay-Investiture. Three hours credit. 

102. The Middle Ages. 

The Crusaders. The Hohenstaufens. Invasion of the Mongols. 
Saint Louis. Life in the Middle Ages. Feudalism. England and 
France in the Middle Ages. The Exile of the Papacy. The Western 
Schism. The Hundred Years' War. The War of the Roses. Con- 
solidation of European Monarchies. Three hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 



103. Backgrounds of Civilization (Introduction to History). 
The aim of this course is to orient the student so that he may 

view in its proper setting the status of the world today. That this 
may be done in a reasonable way, the contributory causes to the 
present intellectual, moral and religious culture are traced from their 
probable origins. In the same way the progressive stages of the 
world's economic and political development as recorded in history are 
followed from the remote past to the present actual situation. 

Three hours credit. 

104. Backgrounds of Civilization (Introduction to History) 
Continued. 

This course reviews the revolution in industry brought on by 
the machine age. It points out the sociological and economic prob- 
lems arising from the centralization of capital and mass production 
which followed in the wake of new discoveries in science and indus- 
trial machines. The new facilities in world communication and trans- 
portation are considered together with the complicated systems of 
distribution and finance which they connote. 

Three hours credit. 

201. Renaissance and Revolution. 

The Revival of Learning, of Art and Politics. Social Condi- 
tions. The Protestant Revolution in Germany, England and Scot- 
land. Catholic Revival. The Huguenot Wars in France. The Revolt 
of the Netherlands. The Thirty Years' War. The Puritan Revolu- 
tion. The Age of Louis XIV. The War of the Spanish Succession. 
The Church and the State. The Making of Russia. The Rise of Prus- 
sia. The Downfall of Poland. The French Revolution. Napoleon Bon- 
aparte. Three hours credit. 

202. Europe Since 1814. 

The Industrial Revolution. England and France in the Nine- 
teenth Century. The Unification of Germany. The Unification of 
Italy. The Social, Political and Religious Conditions in Europe. 
The Eastern Question. The Partition of Africa. The World War 
of 1914. Reconstruction after World War. 

Three hours credit. 

301. American History to the Reconstruction Period. 

This course, with the following ? aims to bring into relief the 
outstanding influences that have shaped the history of the United 
States from the Colonial Period to our own, stressing for this pur- 
pose topics of import for the social, economic and political develop- 
ment of the nation. First semester. 

Three hours credit. 



54 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

302. American History Since the Reconstruction Period. 

A similar course to the preceding, stressing in its latest phases 
the conditions and circumstances that led to America's participation 
in the Great War, with the resulting stimulus to a clearer national 
consciousness of the value and significance of American citizen- 
ship. Three hours credit. 

401. History of Latin America. 

European Background. Early discoveries and settlements in 
the islands and on the mainland of North, Central and South Amer- 
ica. Civilization of the Natives. Spanish and Portuguese Colonial 
Systems. Contribution of the Jesuit and Franciscan Missionaries 
to Culture and Civilization. Abuses of the Spanish Government. The 
Struggles for Independence. History of Independent Mexico and 
Central American Countries after 1821. Economic, Social and Polit- 
ical Life. Three hours credit. 

402. History of Latin America (Continued). 

History of the Independent Countries of South America, Eco- 
nomic, Social and Political Life. The Monroe Doctrine. Signifi- 
cance and Influence. Relation of the Latin American Countries with 
One Another, the United States and the World. Pan Americanism. 
Latin America and the World War. Present Situation and Outlook. 

Three hours credit. 



LATIN 

1-2. Elementary Latin. 

General grammar with oral and written exercises. Caesar, De 
Bello Gallico I-IV. 

3. Cicero. 

In Catilinam I-III; Letters. Grammar and Composition. 

4. Virgil. 

Aeneid I- VI; Ovid, Metamorphoses XIII-XIV. Grammar and 
Composition. 

(Courses 1, 2, 3 and 4 are required of those students who do 
not offer sufficient Latin credits at entrance. These courses do not 
fulfil the requirement of College Latin.) 

101-2. Cicero. 

Pro Archia Poeta, Pro Ligario, Pro Milone; De Senectute, Som- 
nium Scipionis. Frequent composition based on Arnold. 

Six hours credit. 



CATALOGUE 55 



201-2. Horace. 

Horace, selected Odes and Epodes. Frequent compositions based 
on Arnold. 

Six hours credit. 

301. Horace, Juvenal. 
Study of Roman Satire. 

Three hours credit. 

302. Tacitus, Sallust, Livy. 

Selections from the Roman historians; required reading: Taei< 
tus, Agricola or Germania; Sallust, Bellum Catilinarium; Livy, Books 
XXI-XXIV. Three hours credit. 

401. Plautus, Terence. 

Selected plays. Three hours credit. 

402. Pliny, Seneca. 

Pliny, selected letters of Pliny the Younger. Seneca, Moral 
Essays, selected letters. Three hours credit. 

403. Ecclesiastical Latin. 

Hymns and homilies selected. One hour credit. 

MATHEMATICS 

1. Advanced Algebra. 

A course for those who present but one unit of Algebra for 
entrance to college. The work starts with a review of Elementary 
Algebra, and then takes up such subjects as are usually given in a 
third semester high school course of Algebra. 

No college credit. 

2. Solid Geometry. 

A course on geometrical interpretations and applications to ge- 
ometry, for those who have not had Solid Geometry in high school. 
Cannot be counted in fulfilment of the requirements in Mathematics. 

No college credit. 

101. College Algebra. 

After a brief review of the foundations, the folllowing topics are 
treated: variables and limits, binomial theorem, series, logarithms 
determinants, and theories of equation. PREREQUISITES: Algebra,, 
one and one-half units; and Plane Geometry. 

Three hours credit. 

102. Plane Trigonometry. 

The six elementary functions for acute angles; goniometry; 
solution of right and oblique triangles; graphs of the functions and 
solution of simple trigonometric equations. Three hours credit. 



56 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

104. Surveying. 

The theory, use and adjustment of instruments, methods of 
computation and arrangement of data; practical field work and 
topographic map-making. Three hours credit. 

105-6 — Business Mathematics. Percentage; simple and com- 
pound interest; bank, trade and cash discounts; equation of accounts; 
mathematics of sinking funds, bond values, and asset valuation. 

Six hours credit. 

201. Plane Analytical Geometry. 

Loci and their equations. The straight line, the circle, the 
conic sections, transformation of co-ordinates, polar co-ordinates. 
Prerequisites: College Algebra, Plane Trigonometry. 

Four hours credit. 

202. Differential Calculus. 

Fundamental notions of variables; functions, limits, deriva- 
tives and differentials; differentiation of the ordinary algebraic ex- 
ponential and trigonometric functions with applications to rates, 
maxima and minima values and points of inflection. Prerequisites: 
College Algebra, Plane Trigonometry and Plane Analytical Geom- 
etry. Four hours credit. 

301. Integral Calculus. 

The nature of Integration; elementary processes and integrals 
with geometric applications to area and length. Prerequisites: 
College Algebra, Plane Trigonometry and Plane Analytical Geom- 
etry, Differential Calculus. 

One semester. Three hours credit. 

302. Solid Analytical Geometry. 

An introductory treatment of the point, plane, straight line 
and surfaces of revolution. Prerequisites: College Algebra, Plane 
Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry. Three hours credit. 

303. Differential Calculus (Higher Course). 

A continuation of course 202 with special applications to fun- 
tions of more than one variable; partial differentiation, envelopes, 
Taylor's formula, Theorem of Mean Value. Two hours credit. 

304. Integral Calculus (Higher Course). 

A continuation of course 301 with applications to volumes 
and surfaces of revolution; multiple integrals, use of infinite series 
in integration, Formal Integration by various devices, use of a 
table of integrals. Two hours credit. 



v*>- ^^f4~^-~C 



CATALOGUE 57 



PHILOSOPHY 

201. Logic. 

A. Formal Logic. 

Simple apprehension, classification of ideas; verbal terms, the 
classification and use; logical division, definition; judgments and 
propositions, thier division according to quality, quantity and mat- 
ter; opposition, equivalence, and conversion of propositions. Reason- 
ing; fundamental principles of reasoning; the syllogism, its laws, 
figures and modes, other forms of reasoning, induction, analogy; 
classification of arguments according to their validity; sophisms; 
method; the circle. 

B. Applied Criteriology. 

Conceptual truth and the possibility of attaining it; state of the 
mind with regard to truth. Certitude; its nature, kind; Skepticism; 
the Methodical Doubt; opinion, trustworthiness of the human facul- 
ties for the attainment of truth; consciousness, the external senses; 
the intellect, Nominalism, Conceptualism, exaggerated and moderate 
realism. Sources of certitude; human testimony; universal testi- 
mony; Divine testimony; tradition; History; the new criticism; objec- 
tive evidence. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Four hours credit. 

202. General Metaphysics. 

A. Ontology. 

Being and its transcendental attributes; real being, logical being; 
extension, comprehension, analogy, unity, truth, goodness. State of 
being: Actual and possible; proximate and ultimate; foundation of 
intrinsic possibility. Kinds of being: substance, accident; the Aris- 
totelian categories. Causality. Causes in general; material, formal 
and efficient; the first cause; final cause; exemplary cause. Per- 
fection of being; simple and composite; finite and infinite; contin- 
gent and necessary; time and eternity; order, beauty, sublimity. 

B. Cosmology. 

General properties of corporeal substance: quantity; continu- 
ous extension, condensation and rarefaction; impenetrability, space, 
place; motion, time; change, substance, accidents. Intrinsic con- 
stituents of corporeal substances; Atomism; Dynamism; Hylomorph- 
ism. Organic life; the vital principle, nutrition, growth; reproduc- 
tion; sensitive life, sense perceptions, sensuous appetite, spontaneous 
locomotion; the dynamic principle; the substantial form: Darwin- 
ism rejected. Three hours credit. 



58 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

301. Psychology. 

The human intellect and its proper object; its spirituality proved 
by its acts; origin of ideas; innate ideas; Empiricism and Ontologism 
rejected. The human will and its formal object; its freedom; its 
control of the other faculties. Nature of the human soul; a sub- 
stantial principle, simple, spiritual, immortal, its union with the 
body; its origin. The unity and antiquity of the human race. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Four hours credit. 

302-A. Special Metaphysics (Theodicy). 

The Existence of God; metaphysical, physical and moral proofs. 
The nature and attributes of God; His self-existence, infinity, unity, 
immutability, eternity and immensity. 

His operative attributes; a. The Divine intelligence; His know- 
ledge of pure intelligence, of vision; scientia media of futuribles. b. 
The Divine will; Its holiness; Its primary and secondary objects; Its 
relation toward moral and physical evil. Action of God in the uni- 
verse; creation; conservation; concurrence; Divine providence; mir- 
acles. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Four hours credit. 

401. General Ethics. 

Ethics defined. The material object of ethics; the human act, 
the voluntary, the free and deliberate, and the causes modifying the 
voluntary and the free. The foundation of morality; the ultimate 
end of man, the divine eternal law, the divine natural law. The 
formal object of ethics; the morality of human acts, the norm of 
morality, hedonism, ultilitarianism, rationalism and moral positivism 
refuted, the determinants of morality, the proximate objective crite- 
rion of morality, conscience. Four hours credit. 

402. Special Eth'cs. 

Rights and, duties in general. Man's duties toward God. Man's 
duties toward himself. Man's duties toward others. Right of own- 
ership. Social system of collectivism. Socialism. Modes of acquir- 
ing property. Society in general. The family. Divine institution, 
unity and indissolubility of marriage. Parental authority. Educa- 
tion. Civil society; its nature, origin, end. Origin of supreme civil 
authority. Specific forms of civil government. International law. 

m , - Four hours credit. 

J.oi . 

* 002 - D . History of Philosophy. 

Oriental Philosophy; Greek Philosophy; Christian Philosophy; 
the Gnostics; the Neo-P'latonists; the Fathers of the Church; 
Scholastic Philosophy; the Revival of Platonism, of Aristotelianism, 
of Atomism; the Secular Philosophers; the Political Philosophers. 



CATA LOGUE 59 

Jot H-tS-t^ ^AL~-*(?LX. 

Descartes and his followers; Malebranche, Locke, Hume, Vol- 
taire, the Encyclopaedists; Leibnitz, the Scottish School ? the Trans- 
cendentalists; Kant, Fichte, Schelling and their schools of thought. 
The Neo-Kantians. Current Philosophical Theories. The Neo-Scholas- 
tics. Two hours credit. 

PHYSICS. 

Phys. 201-2. General Physics. 

Mechanics, Sound, Light, Heat, Magnetism and Electricity. Pre- 
requisite: Plane Trigonometry. 

Lecture, two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

Given every year. 

Phys. 301-2. Physical Optics. 

Dispersion, interference, diffraction, double refraction, polari- 
zation, magneto-optics and spectroscopy. Prerequisite: Differential 
Calculus. 

Lecture, three hours per week, two semesters. 

Offered alternate years; to be given 1935-36. 

Six hours credit. 

Phys. 303-4. Analytical Mechanics. 

A thorough study and mathematical treatment of Statics, Ki- 
netics. Prerequisite: Differential and Integral Calculus, unless latter 
is taken concurrently. 

Lecture, three hours per week, two semesters. 

Phys. 305-6. Experimental Physics. 

Advanced laboratory work in Mechanics, Molecular Physics, and 
Heat. Recommended to be taken with courses 303-4. Prerequisite: 
Courses 201-2. 

Laboratory six hours per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

Offered alternate years; to be given 1935-36. 

Phys. 401-2. Experimental Physics. 
Advanced laboratory work in Electricity and Magnetism. This 
includes a practical study of the properties of direct and alternating 
currents and dynamo-electric machinery. 

Laboratory six hours per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

Offered alternate years; given 1934-35. 

Phys. 403. Electromagnetic Theory and Related Topics. 

Lecture, two hours per week. 

One semester. Two hours credit. 

Offered alternate years. 



60 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 

Ampie opportunity is offered the student for physical exer- 
cises, both indoor and outdoor. A well equipped gymnasium affords 
opportunity for apparatus work. Organized leagues in baseball, 
basketball and tennis help to make these sports more interesting, 
and insure participation in them by a large number of students. A 
beautiful natural lake three minutes walk from the College makes 
it possible to have swimming during almost the whole school year. 
Instruction is given in boxing, wrestling and in track work. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

101-2. American Government. 

American National Government. The historical background 
of the Federal Constitution and of political issues in the United 
States, and the organization and functions of the National Govern- 
ment. The President. The Cabinet. The Senate. The House of 
Representatives. The Supreme Court and the Subordinate Federal 
Courts. Local and State Government in the United States. ' The 
place of the States in the Nation. The State Constitutions. The 
State Legislature. The State Courts. Organization and functions 
of administration in counties and cities. Six hours credit. 

201-2. Party Politics. 

The development of political parties in the United States. Im- 
portance of the extra-constitutional element in American Govern- 
ment. Party platforms. Presidential campaigns and elections. 
The nominating machinery; the Presidential primary and the 
nominating convention. Party patronage. The spoils system 
and civil service reform. State parties and practical politics in 
local government. Two Semesters. Six hours credit. 

301-2. American Government and Party Politics. 

A more general course adapted to the needs of students who 
desire to make a less intensive study of the matter of Courses 1-4. 
Two semesters. Three hours credit. 

401-2. Constitutional Law. 

Fundamental principles of the United States Constitution 
viewed in the light of their history, development and application. 
The making of the Constitution. The Constitution regarded as a 
grant of power. Federal powers and State powers. The principle 
of "checks and balances." The doctrine of Judicial Supremacy. 
Constitutional Limitations on Legislative Power. Limits of the 



CATALOGUE 61 



Police Power of the States. The Guarantees of the Fourteenth 
Amendment. Religious Liberty. The Fifteenth Amendment and 
the Negro Problem. State Constitutions. Two Semesters. 

Six hours credit. 

403. Comparative Government. 

A comparative study of the governmental organization and 
administration of the principal European nations. 

Three hours credit. 



PUBLIC SPEAKING. 



101. Principles of Vocal Expression. 

Practical training in the fundamentals of effective speaking. 
Instruction on the management of the breath; methods of acquiring 
clear articulation; correct and refined pronunciation; direct, con- 
versational and natural speaking; inflection; qualities of voice and 
their use; purity, range and flexibility of tone. Individual criticism 
and conference with the instructor. One hour credit. 

102. Gesture and Technique of Action. 

The study of poise, posture, movement and gesture; spon- 
taneity of expression; correction of mannerisms; power and pathos; 
ease, grace and effectiveness of delivery. Class exercises, criti- 
cisms and conferences. One hour credit. 

201. Argumentation and Debating. 

A practical training for those students who have taken or are 
taking the course in oratory prescribed under English 204. Thought 
development; division and arrangement; argumentative, persuasive 
and demonstrative speeches; a finished argument and the fallacies 
of argument; the essentials of parliamentary law and practice; man- 
ner of conducting deliberative assemblies. Class exercises ? criti- 
cisms and conferences. One hour credit. 

202. The Occasional Public Address. 

Informal public address; the presentation of business proposi- 
tions before small or large audiences; impromptu and extempore 
speaking; after-dinner talks. Speeches for various occasions. Class 
exercises, individual criticisms and conferences. 

One hour credit. 



62 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



RELIGION 

101-2. Religion and Leadership. 

Education and ideals. Religion in education. Historical 
backgrounds. A conspectus of Catholic Philosophy, devotional life, 
dogma and practice, and its dynamic use in motivating social ideals. 
Text: Lord, Religion and Leadership. 
An orientation course for Catholic Freshmen. 

Two hours credit. 
201-2. Christian Life and Worship. 
A study of the vital forces of the corporate worship of the Catho- 
lic religion that contribute to the upbuilding of individual charac- 
ter, social solidarity and Catholic Action. The Mass, the crowning 
act of Christian Worship. The Liturgy of the Sacraments. 
Text: Ellard, Christian Life and Worship. 
Given in 1934-1935. Two hours credit. 

301-2. Contemporary Religious Problems. 
A study of the religious sources of social disunion and dis- 
organization. 

Text: Morrison, The Catholic Church and the Modern Mind. 
To be given 1935-36. Two hours credit. 

401-2. Christian Origins. 

A critical study of the Gospels as historical documents forming 
the basis of Christianity. An application of the methods of his- 
torical criticism. 

Text: Dowd, The Gospel Guide. Two hours credit. 

404. 'Moral Course. 

Notions on Morality. The Church's part in determining Moral- 
ity. Marriage as a sacrament. Prenuptial requirements of physi- 
cal fitness. Premarital chastity. The rights and duties of the 
married couple. Birth control. Divorce. 
Text: Morrison, Marriage. 

Required of Catholic Seniors. One hour credit. 

113-4. Comparative Religion. 

Two hours credit. 
213-4. Biblical Criticism. 

Two hours credit. 
313-4. Analysis of Faith. 

Two hours credit. 
413-4. Morality. 

Two hours credit. 



N. B. Courses 113-114, 213-214, 313-4, 413-414 are designated 
for non-Catholic students. 



CATALOGUE 63 



SOCIOLOGY 

401. Social History. 

A survey of ancient, medieval and modern social movements and 
institutions. Marriage and the family in ancient Greece, Rome, 
among the Hebrews and in Christian times. Labor in ancient Greece, 
Rome, among the Hebrews and in Christian times. The rise, decline, 
and suppression of the Guilds. Capitalism and the Reformation. 

Three hours credit. 

402. General Sociology — The Family. 

Definition of sociology; its relations to Ethics, Revealed Religion, 
Political and Economic Sciences; Its postulates; Evolution and Soci- 
ology; Human personality and its social significance. Rights and 
Duties; Theories of Kant and Spencer. The Social Virtues: Justice, 
Charity and Equity. The nature and the ends of marriage; The 
functions of the family. Divorce, Neo-Malthusianism, Sterilization, 
The Eugenic Movement. Forces inimical to the family in the polit- 
ical, economic and social spheres. Remedial measures. Encyclical 
of Pius XI. Three hours credit. 

403. Sociology: The State and International Relations. 
Origin of the State and of civil authority. Theories of Hobbes 

Locke and Rosseau. The early American theory of the State and 
Scholastic Political Philosophy. The nature of authority and of law. 
The functions of the State. The Liberal, Socialist and Fascist State, 
intervention and State assistance: Old Age Dependency; Accidents; 
Sickness; Unemployment; Family Dependency. Social Legislation 
and Social Insurances. Representative Government and Political 
Parties; the plural vote and proportionate representation. Consulta- 
tive role of economic and professional councils in Government. 

International relations. Nationalism and internationalism; 
true and false patriotism. The World Court and the League of Na- 
tions. International cooperation in economic and other social prob- 
lems. Three hours credit. 

404. Sociology, Economic Relations. 

Property, rights and duties. False theories of property. Present 
distribution, concentration and control of wealth. Government own- 
ership. Government supervision of industry, commerce and finance 
in the interests of the common good. Capitalism as a vicious system: 
Free competition, economic domination, economic nationalism and 
imperialism, financial internationalism. The problem of wages: The 
morality of the wage contract. Individual and family living wage, 
minimum wage laws. Modifications of the wage system: Labor 
participation in management, profit sharing and labor stock-holding, 
industrial pensions. Strikes, lockouts and industrial arbitration. 
Labor Unions: Right of organization; functions of the Union; Col- 



64 SPRING HIL L COLLEGE 

lective Bargaining. The Company Union, the closed and the open 
shop. Defects and abuses in the present Union situation and their 
remedies. The Christian Labor Union Movement. Economic reor- 
ganization and regulation. Encyclicals of Leo XIII On the Condition 
of the Workingmen and of Piux XI On The Reconstruction of the 
Social Order. Three hours credit. 

405. Social Problems. 

Poverty: Causes, prevention, relief. Crime: causes and treat- 
ment, legal and judicial reform. Juvenile delinquency. Treatment 
of defectives. The alcoholic and narcotic problems. Heredity and 
eugenics. Three hours credit. 

406. Organized Charity. 

Public and private agencies, their cooperation. The Church 
and organized charity: the social work of the Religious Orders and 
the Sodality; Ozanam and the Saint Vincent de Paul Society. Social 
case work; the purpose, methods of investigation diagnosis and treat- 
ment. Three hours credit. 

SPANISH. 

1. Elementary Spanish. 

Grammar: Garner. Alphabet, pronunciation, accentuation, 
punctuation and capitals. The article and noun; adjectives; numer- 
als; personal and demonstrative pronouns; auxiliary and regular 
verbs. For reading: Second Spanish Book, Worman and Bransby 
(complete). First semester. No college credit. 

2. Elementary Spanish (Continued). 

Grammar: Garner. Pronouns (continued) — relative, interroga- 
tive and indefinite. Auxiliary and regular verbs (repeated), ortho- 
graphic changes, formation of tenses, passive voice, reflexive verbs, 
impersonal verbs. For reading: Alarcon, El Capitan Veneno. Second 
semester. No college credit. 

101-2. Intermediate Spanish. 

Open to students who have completed Courses 1-2' or who have 
presented two units of Spanish for admission. Advanced grammar; 
idiomatic uses of the prepositions; irregular verbs, verbs requiring 
a preposition. Composition and conversation. Colma, Lecturas Re- 
creatives; Valera, El Pajaro Verde; Alarcon, Novelas Cortas. 

Six hours credit. 

201-2. Advanced Spanish. 

Survey course in Spanish literature from the XII century to 
modern times. Spanish Anthology will be used as class text and 
readings in the classics will be required out of class. References: 



CATALOGUE 65 



FitzMaurice-Kelly, History of Spanish Literature; Salcedo Ruiz, 
Historia de la literatura espanola; Northup, Introduction to Span- 
ish Literature. 

301. Classical Prose. 

Selections from Cervantes, Don Quixote de la Mancha; St. The- 
resa, Life of; Ribadeneira, Historia del Cisma de Inglaterra, selec- 
tions. Kelly, History of Spanish Literature. Three hours credit. 

302. Classical Poetry. 

Fray Luis de Leon, poesias; Romancero General (Duran) ; 
Jorge Manriquo, Coplas, selections. Three hours credit. 

401. Modern Prose. 

Luis Coloma, Jeromin; Boy, La Reina Martir; Jose Maria 
Pereda, Penas arriba, Cuentos y novelas; Saj, Europa salvaje; Fer- 
nan Caballero, La Gaviota, Clemencia; Valvuena, Estudios Critices. 

Three hours credit. 

402. Modern Poetry. 

Selections from the writings of Alberto Risco, Jose Selgas, 
Nunez de Arce, Zorilla. Three hours credit. 



STENOGRAPHY 

101-2. Shorthand. 

A thorough study of the principles of Gregg Shorthand with 
special emphasis on phonetics. Dictation of business letters and 
interpretation of unseen passages of court testimony. 

Four hours credit. 

112-2. Typewriting. 

A first course for students who wish to learn the elements of 
typewriting technique and general use of the machine. 

Four hours credit. 



66 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Student Organizations 



As college education is accomplished not only dur- 
ing the hours of class, but also in no small degree during 
the students' intercourse with each other at other periods, 
the College heartily encourages all student organizations 
which help to develop in the student initiative, self- 
reliance and leadership in organized religious and social 
movements, qualities which are expected of college men 
generally. 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR CREDIT 

The college accepts towards graduation 4 credits in 
extra-curricular activities, and requires a minimum of 
1 such credit from all candidates for a degree. The 
scale by which such credits are given is as follows: 

A) One credit per year: to President of the Student 

(Council, Prefect of College Sodality, Editor-in- 
Chief of Springhillian, and presidents of vari- 
ous study-clubs; also to members of various 
musical organizations, and members of Inter- 
collegiate Debating team. 

B) One-half credit per year: to members of all recog- 

nized college organizations listed in this cata- 
logue, and such officers as are not named in 
(A) above. 

Participation in any activity is contingent upon the 
rules of the particular organization, and subject to the 
academic standing of the student. Thus, upon failure 
in any subject a student may be asked to drop one extra- 
curricular activity, and in the case of several failures 
will be liable to suspension from all student organiza- 
tions. 

SPRING HILL STUDENT COUNCIL 

The Spring Hill Student Council is elected by the 
Student Body to safeguard the honor and traditions of 



CATALOGUE 67 



the College and to promote and direct its activities, with 
the approval of the faculty. 

MEMBERS 

Joe Martin Senior 

Eugene LeCompte Senior 

Charles Traynor... . Junior 

Paul Brunson Junior 

Charles M. J. Moseley Sophomore 

Michael J. Donahue, Jr - Sophomore 

Charles Phillips Freshman 

OFFICERS 

Joe Martin President 

Eugene LeCompte Vice-President 

Charles Traynor Secretary 

SODALITY OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION. 

The purpose of this Sodality is to develop Christian 
character under the protection of the Mother of Christ 
and to cultivate the lay apostolate. The Sodality en- 
deavors to attain this end by conducting weekly meetings 
at which the office of the Blessed Virgin is recited and 
instructions are given by the Director and by organizing 
sections for the promotion of special activities. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Edward T. Cassidy, S. J Moderator 

•-Starks O'Shea Prefect 

Charles Traynor ...Sub-Prefect 

Buckner Webb Recording Secretary 

Reginald Hatcher Corresponding Secretary 

APOSTLESHIP OF PRAYER — LEAGUE OF THE SACRED 

HEART. 

This Association aims at training its members in the 
practice of prayer and other good works by seeking in 
them the interests of the Sacred Heart of Jesus: "The 
glory of God and the good of souls."' Meetings are held 
once a month. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Andrew B. Fox, S. J Moderator 

Breen Bland. Head Promoter 



68 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



SAINT JOHN BERCHMAN'S SANCTUARY SOCIETY 

The object of this Society is to contribute to the 
beauty and solemnity of Divine Worship by the accurate 
performance of liturgical ceremonies. The members are 
accorded the privilege of serving the priests at the altar. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Edward T. Cassidy, S. J Moderator 

Eugene Dobyns Prefect 

THE SPRINGHILLIAN. 

The Springhillian, formerly a quarterly publication, 
is now published monthly. It is edited by the students 
under the direction of a member of the faculty to encour- 
age self-expression and literary ambition among the stu- 
dents, and to record current events of the College. 

STAFF 

Rev. Charles J. Quirk, S. J Moderator 

^C. P. Martin.... Editor-in-Chief 

"James Dowds ...Associate 

John Henry '_ Associate 

Paul Brunson Literary Editor 

Jack Bland Activities 

James Reilly Exchanges 

Burton Browne Sports 

Jack Zalumas Sports 

Victor Geld.... Business 

Carle McEvoy Business 

Leonard Brandau.. Circulation 

Burke McEllin Circulation 

Hector L. Bruno Staff Artist 



THE SOCIAL STUDY CLUB 

The Social Study Club was organized last year for 
the study and discussion of social problems. The relation 
of government to economic problems, and the rights and 
obligations of capital and labor were among the subjects 
discussed at the meetings during the past few months. 



CATALOGUE 69 



THE PORTIER DRAMATIC AND DEBATING ACADEMY. 

This Society is named in memory of the learned and 
saintly prelate, the Rt. Rev. Michael Portier, D.D., first 
Bishop of Mobile, who founded the College in 1830. 

Membership is open to all students and is attained 
by those who demonstrate their literary ability to the 
satisfaction of the Academy. 

The members hold weekly meetings at which they 
engage in literary and forensic exercises. They also stage 
entertainments for the student body at intervals during 
the year and a public dramatic production once a year. 
The Intercollegiate Debating Team is chosen from this 
Academy. 

OFFICERS 
1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Douglas Grymes President. Frank Skeffington 

John Callahanf^r. Vice President Charles Moseley 

John Henry Secretary James Borthwick 

Jules Houssiere Treasurer Eugene Dobyns 

Eugene Dobyns Sgt.-at-Arms Charles Miller 

Moderator Mr. Louis J. Twomey, S. J. 

THE SPRING HILL GLEE CLUB 

This organization has for its aim the desire to excel 
in vocal music. Its membership is open to all students 
who are interested in vocal expression. It has one essen- 
tial requirement, however, and this is attendance at the 
practices, which are held twice a week, 

OFFICERS 

Dr. Edward V. Cupero Conductor 

Charles M. J. Moseley President 

Roger Ching Vice-President 

Eugene LeCompte.*.*^ , Secretary 

MEMBERS 
Roger Ching, Everett Cox, Louis Dion, Floyd Doughty, Edward 
Freyberg, Gerald Griffin, John L. Lavretta, Eugene LeCompte, 
C. P. Martin, Carle McEvoy, Edwin Melsheimer, Charles M. J. Mose- 
ley, John Thompson, M. Carey Thompson. 



~0 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE ORCHESTRA 
OFFICERS 

Dr. Edward Victor Cupero Conductor 

Charles M. J. Moseley President 

M. Carey Thompson... Vice President 

Richard Dwight Secretary 

MEMBERS 
Cecil Gavin Chason, James Cook, Richard Dwight, Edward Frey- 
berg, Alvin de la Houssaye, Charles M. J. Moseley, Marshall Seifert, 
Francis Simpson, William Talbott, M. Carey Thompson, George 
Wood. 

SPRING HILL COLLEGE BAND 

OFFICERS 

Dr. Edward Victor Cupero Conductor 

Charles M. J. Moseley .President 

M. Carey Thompson Vice President 

Richard Dwight t Secretary 

MEMBERS 
Cecil Gavin Chason, James Cook, Paul Deimling, Richard Dwight, 
Edward Freyberg, Victor Geld, John L. Lavretta, Jr., Milton Liebe- 
skind, Charles M. J. Moseley, William J. Phelan, Marshall Sei- 
fort, Francis Simpson, Thomas A. Steely, William Talbott, M. Carey 
Thompson, Fred E. Walker, Charles Wilds, George Wood. 
SPRING HILL POETRY SOCIETY 
The purpose of this club is to promote a greater interest in Phy- 
ation of poetry. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. Charles J. Quirk... Moderator 

C. P. Martin..... President 

Paul Brunson Vice President 

Jack D. Bland -Secretary 

THE PHYSICS CLUB 
The purpose of this club is to promote a greater interest in Phy- 
sics. At its bi-monthly meeting, demonstrations present the matter 
discussed in class, and papers are given by the students or by visit- 
ing lecturers. 

OFFICERS 

Rev. A. J. Westland, S. J Moderator 

Breen Bland - President 

Alvin B. Hayles...— Vice President 

Albert J. Pilkington ...Secretary 

Carle McEvoy Librarian 

George Wood - - Librarian 



CATALOGUE 71 



THE "S" CLUB 

This club has for its object the promotion of interest 
in athletics at Spring Hill. Membership is limited to those 
who have been awarded the letter S for excellence in any 
branch of athletics, and who are striving to live up to the 
ideals of true sportsmanship. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Spring Hill endeavors to keep in touch with its former 
students, and takes pride in their achievements. The Col- 
lege has been greatly helped by certain organizations 
formed by the Alumni in different cities for the purpose 
of fostering the recollections of their college days, and 
working for the interest of their Alma Mater. These are : 

Augusta Spring Hill College Club 
Georgia Club of Spring Hill College 
New Orleans Spring Hill College Club 
Thibodaux Spring Hill College Club 
Montgomery Spring Hill College Club 
Washington Spring Hill College Club 
Chicago Spring Hill College Club 
New York Alumni of Spring Hill College, Inc. 
The St. Louis Chapter of the Alumni Association of Spring 
Hill College 



GOLF CLUB 

To promote greater interest among the students in 
golf this organization was founded. From this club are 
selected the students who participate in intercollegiate 
and local tournaments. 

OFFICERS 

Charles Traynor .President 

William Saul-t^T:... Vice-President 

Max DeMouy Secretary 

Thomas Saul— r^ Treasurer 



72 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

One Hundred Fourth 
Annual Commencement 

OF 

Spring Hill College 

TUESDAY, MAY 25, 1934 

COLLEGE CAMPUS 

Spring Hill College 

PROGRAM 

National Emblem (March) Bagley 

* * * 

The Star Spangled Banner Key 

* * * 

President's Address Very Rev. John J. Druhan, S. J. 

ADDRESS TO THE GRADUATES 

Mr. Alvin R. Christovich 

Assistant City Attorney of the City of New Orleans 

* * * 

L'Estrella Spanish Serenade Mardones 

* * * 

AWARD OF MEDALS 

* * * 

Spring Hill Graduation Song.... Prof. A. J. Staub, Mus. D. 
The Senior Class of 1934 

(Directed by Mr. Peter J. Colvin; accompaniment, Prof. A. J. Staub) 

* * * 

VALEDICTORY 

Patrick J. Potts 

* * * 

DEGREES CONFERRED 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

James Arthur Carney, Jr. Patrick John Potts 

(magna cum laude) (cum laude) 

John Spears Daniel, Jr. Leo Francis Sneeringer 

(cum laude) John Joseph Travis 

Emmett Francis Goodman Nell Scanlan Vaughan* 

John William Kopecky Edmund Richard Vogelgesang 

(magna cum laude) 
Wilfred McKittrick Leatherwood 
(cum laude) 
*Degree conferred, July 14, 1934. 



CATALOGUE 73 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Willard Herrick Blount Irving Maisel 

John George Boehm (cum laude) 

(cum laude) William E. North 
Fletcher Eugene Davis, Jr. (cum laude) 

Louis Frisbie DeMouy Richard J. Putnam 
Charles Rene Houssiere, Jr. (cum laude) 

(cum laude) Jules Blanchet Schwing 

Nicholas A. Lamb Herbert Mansfield Stein, Jr. 

(cum laude) 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE 

Nicholas F. Dischler Thomas Gambus Sparks Vignes, Jr. 

Raymond Francis Driscoll Carl Robert Shirk 

Ernest Arthur Houssiere (cum laude) 

* * * 

Alumni Induction of Graduates 

* * * 

Purple and White Chapman and Hynes 



Prizes 

THE JOSEPH BLOCK MEMORIAL MEDAL to be awarded to the 
student who contributed most to the advancement of Music at 
Spring Hill College was founded by his, children: Edward Block 
of New York, Alexander Block, Mrs. Bettie Haas, Mrs. Emma 
Eichold, Mrs. Fannie B. Simon of Mobile. 

This medal was won in 1934 by William Suffich. 

THE BISHOP O'SULLIVAN MEMORIAL MEDAL, founded in honor 
of the Most Rev. Jeremiah O'Sullivan, D. D., Bishop of Mobile, 
for excellence in Christian Doctrine and Ecclesiastical History. 
This medal was won in 1934 by John W. Kopecky. 
Next in merit, Charles R. Houssiere, Marshall Seifert. 

THE HUTCHISON MEDAL, founded by (Miller Reese Hutchison, 
E. E., Ph. D., for the best thesis in Philosophy. 

This medal was won in 1934 by John W. Kopecky. 
Next in merit, Leo Francis Sneeringer, John J. Travis. 



74 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

THE MERILH MEDAL, founded by Edmond L. Merilh, B. S., '17, 
of New Orleans, La., for the best English essay. 

This medal was won in 1934 by Edmund Vogelgesang. 
Next in merit, Garet Van Antwerp, Jr. 

THE WALSH MEMORIAL MEDAL, founded in memory of William 
A. Walsh, A. B., '08, for excellence in Oratory. 

This medal was won in 1934 by Eugene J. LeCompte. 
Next in merit, ex aequo: Charles M. J. Moseley, Carey 
Thompson, Jr. 

THE O'CALLAGHAN MEDAL, donated by Rev. J. McDermott, in 
memory of Rev. C. T. O'Callaghan, D. D., for the best paper in 
Latin. 

This medal was won in 1934 by LaVerne J. Cure. 

THE MASTIN MEDAL, founded by William M. Mastin, M. D., LL. D., 
for the best paper in General and Organic Chemistry. 

This medal was won in 1934 by Charles R. Houssiere. 
Next in merit, Jules Houssiere. 

THE STEWART MEDAL, donated by D. M. Stewart, M. D., for the 
best paper in Biology. 

This medal was won in 1934 by John S. Daniel, Jr. 
Next in merit, William Ching, Richard J. Putnam. 

THE DEPORTMENT MEDAL, founded by the Most Reverend 
Edward P. Allen, D. D., for Excellent Deportment, to be awarded 
by the votes of the students, with the approbation of the Faculty. 

This medal was won in 1934 by John W. Kopeeky. 

Next in merit, Charles R. Houssiere, Carl Shirk, Emmett 

Goodman. 

THE MATT RICE SERVICE CUP, founded by the Omicron Sigma 
Chapter of Alpha Delta Gamma in memory of Matthew P. Rice, 
A. B., '19, a founder of the local chapter and a loyal Spring- 
hillian, to be awarded to the student, who, during the year, has 
rendered the greatest service to the College. 

This cup was awarded in 1934 to Carl R. Shirk. 



CATALOGUE 



75 



CLASS ROLL 



Abbot, J.Lloyd, Jr. 
Adams, David B. 
Akridge, Claude T. 
di Andrea, M,aurizio 
Bailey, Bradley 
Bean, Robert L. 
Beddow, Frank P., Jr. 
Bernard, Raymond E. 
Bordelon, Charles 
Caceres, Julio C. 
Capps, Mills 
Chason, Cecil G. 
Cox, Everett T. 
Cronier, E. Winston 
Deimling, Paul L. 
Demouy, Max Lee 
Dodd, Thomas H. 
Dolan, Charles 
Dolan, George 
Dolan, Richard 
Doughty, J. Floyd 
D wight, Richard E. 
Erwin, James H. 
Freyberg, E. Joseph 
Geer, Vasco R. 
Geld, Victor S. 
Geron, Farrington G. 
Glass, James, M., Jr. 
Grannis, John A., Jr. 
Grigsby, B. Prewkt 
Hardesty, John R. 
Harrison, Alfred L. 
Hazel, Guy W., Jr. 
Henderson, William Ware, 
Holliman, Herbert H. 
Holmes, William R. 
Howard, Karl N. 
Hyland, Norman D. 
Jarvis, Andrew W. 
Johnston, Wellington H. 



FRESHMElN 

Kemp, William B., Jr. 

Krumeich, Edward E. 

Lange, Charles E. 

Lawler, John C, Jr. 

Martin, Ed. 

Martin, Harold P. 

Mayeux, Lance James 

MlcConaghy, Charles 

McCowan, Edwin Tyson 

McEllin, James Burke 

Melsheimer, Edwin S. 

Miller, Charles 

Miller, Harold Crenshaw 

Minondo, Manuel A. 

Moore, Michael 

Norville, Richard G. 

Oliver, M'arshall 

Pap pas, Earle 

Partridge, William T. 

Phelan, William J. 

Phillips, Charles W. 

Plauche, Thomas J. 

Pringle, Milton B. 

Quint, Edwin Louis 

Robertson, Harold Allen 

Roell, LeRoy Charles 

Ryan, Edmund V. 

Seifert, Lee Roe 

Slaughter, Carl 

Smith, Walter 

Spellman, William T. 

Stanard, William Douglas 

Steely, Thomas A., Jr. 
Jr. Tacon, Avelin P., Jr. 

Talbott, John Daniel, Jr. 

Talbott, William R., Jr. 

Walker, Fred Earl, Jr. 

Wilds, Charles E., Jr. 

"\#mes, J. Judson 

Zieman, Edward 



76 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



yjrl 



SOPHOMORES 



Allen, Harold G. 
Andrews, Francis J. 
Barrasso, Louis A., Jr. 
Boudoin, Irby T., Jr. 
Bell, Thomas D. 
Bixler, William H. 
Bland, Breen 
Bland, Jack D. 
Boehm, Frank J., Jr. 
Borthwick, James 
Brandau, Leonard 
Britton, Vernon 
Browne, F. Burton 
Bruno, Hector S. 
Bulwinkle, Ernest H., Jr. 
Burke, Vincent B. 
Busby, F. E. 
Byrd, Billie 
Crigler, Fred D. 
DeCoursey, Frank E. 
Dion, Louis A. 
Donahue, Michael J., Jr. 
Duval, Philip E. 
Hayles, Alvin B. 
Henderson, Kenneth E. 
Herndon, Robin C, Jr. 
de la Houssaye, Alvin G. 



Hyde, William J., Jr. 
Hymel, Lynn 
Kilborn, Vincent F. 
Lanaux, Thomas L. 
Lavretta, John L., Jr. 
Lawley, Eugene 
Leftwich, Robert C. 
Leibeskind, Milton M. 
Long, Henry L. 
Marshall, John S., Jr. 
McDonald, Daniel J. 
McEvoy, L. Carle 
Moseley, Charles M. J. 
Palmes, Ed. 
Pilkington, Albert J. 
Reilly, James B. 
Rutherford, Jack 
Sutherland, Eugene C. 
Tarantino, John J. 
Thompson, M. Carey, Jr. 
Thompson, J. B., Jr. 
Waller, Shannon 
Walsh, Thomas D. 
Wilson, Louie 
Wood, George F. 
Zalumas, Jack 



JUNIORS 



Bedford, Stephen K. 
Bordelon, J. Y. 
Bordelon, Warren 
Boyd, Harry / 

Brassell, Richard Tr 
Brock, Lewis A. 
Brunson, Paul W. 
Ching, Roger B. 
Ching, William 
Crittenden, James R. 
Duffy, Charles W. 
Duffy, Daniel 
Flanagan, William P. 



Fulford, Briesten 
Gares, Everett I. 
Griffin, Gerald J. 
Grymes, Douglas 
Hatcher, Reginald W., Jr. 
Henry, John R. 
Houssiere, Jules 
Kelly, Donald 
McCown, Lawrence 
Miller, Bertrand A. 
Miller, C. W. 
O'Rourke, Michael Francis 
Pennington, Julius A. 



CATALOGUE 



77 



Reeves, Leslie Howard 
Repoll, John, Jr. 
Roney, Herbert 
Saul, Thomas L. 
Seifert, Marshall 
Simpson, Francis H. 
Traynor, JC. E., Jr. 



Vonesh, Otto Charles 
Waller, Charlie L., Jr. 
Walsh, Daniel C. 
Webb, Buckner G. 
Wettermark, Alfred B. 
Wulff, Donald E. 
Zieman, Jack 



Angle, Lanier P. 
Braswell, J. Bruce 
. Callahan, J. M. 
Crane, Joseph 
Dobyns, Eugene 
Dowds, James J., Jr. 
Elsevier, William 
Fort, Marshall 
Helmsing, Joseph H. 
Hope, John C, Jr. 
Kerrigan, Thomas 
LeCompte, Eugene 
Martin, C. P. 



SENIORS 

Martin, Joe 
Mudd, Dayton H., Jr. 
O'Shea, Starks 
Palmes, Jack 
Powell, Marion 
Power, Daniel 
Saul, William H., Jr. 
Sitterle, Julius 
^-Skeffington, Francis ^ 
Switzer, John E. 
Thompson, E. Leroy 
Weinacker, Robert M., Jr. y 






Cook, James W. 
Jaubert, M. Y. 



SPECIAL 

Sigler, Chas. W. 



*\y ~ 



78 SPRING HIL L OOLLBGE 

REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1934-35 

Abbot, J. Lloyd, Jr. Alabama 

-J- Adams, David B .Texas 

Akridge, Claude T Alabama 

Allen, Harold G. Alabama 

/ di Andrea, Maurizio , South Carolina ' 

Andrews, Francis J. Alabama 

Angle, Lanier P. Alabama 

4' Bailey, Bradley Pennsylvania 

^ Barrasso, Louis A., Jr Tennessee 

jf. Baudouin, Irby T., Jr. ...Louisiana 

Bean, Robert L .Alabama 

Beddow, Frank P., Jr Florida 

i Bedford, Stephen K Missouri 

Bell, Thomas D Alabama 

_jl Bernard, Raymond E Louisiana '-" 

Bixler, William H..._ Alabama 

^ Bland, Breen Tennessee 

, Bland, Jack D. Tennessee 

xBoehm, Frank J., Jr Missouri 

; Bordelon, Charles Louisiana 

Bordelon, J. Y .Louisiana 

| Bordelon, Warren Louisiana 

Borthwick, James Mississippi 

Boyd, Harry Alabama 

Brandau, Leonard Alabama 

vfirassell, Richard T... - Alabama 

Braswell, J. Bruce ~ Alabama 

Britton, Vernon..... Alabama 

Brock, Lewis A Alabama 

4-Brown, F. Burton , Tennessee 

j Bruno, Hector S Puerto Rico 

Brunson, Paul W Alabama 

Bulwinkle, Ernest N., Jr Alabama 

> Burke, Vincent B Florida 

Busby, F. E Alabama 

Byrd, Billie - JFlorida 

| Caceres, Julio C San Salvador 

J Callahan, J. M ....Arkansas 

^Capps, Mills Tennessee 

i Chason, Cecil G.— ....- Alabama 



CATALOGUE 79 



Ji Ching, Roger B. Tennessee 

> Ching, William ■_ Tennessee 

Cook, James W Alabama 

*Cox, Everett T . Texas 

Crane, Joseph.. Alabama 

Crigler, Fred D Alabama 

Crittendon, James R ~ - Alabama 

Cronier, E. Winston Alabama 

4 DeCoursey, Frank E Kansas 

Deimling, Paul L South Carolina 

DeMouy, Max Lee Alabama 

Dion, Louis A. Florida 

Dobyris, Eugene Illinois 

Dodd, Thomas H Alabama 

Dolan, Charles.. Alabama 

Dolan, George Alabama 

Dolan, Richard.... Georgia 

Donahue, Michael J., Jr .' Alabama 

Doughty, J. Floyd Mississippi 

4-Dowds, James J., Jr Arkansas ' 

4- Duffy, Charles W.. — - ..Illinois 

-#■ Duffy, Daniel Illinois 

Duval, Philip E Alabama 

4_ Dwight, Richard E Iowa 

Elsevier, William Alabama 

Erwin, James H , Alabama 

* Flanagan, William P Maine 

Fort, Marshall W Alabama 

j Freyberg, E. Joseph Florida 

Fulford, Briesten Alabama 

Gares, Everett I Louisiana 

Geer, Vasco R Alabama 

4. Geld, Victor S Pennsylvania 

Geron, Farrington G. Alabama 

Glass, James M., Jr... Alabama 

> Grannis, John A., Jr. Tennessee 

>. Griffin, Gerald J Minnesota 

... Grigsby, B. Prewitt Kentucky 

j,. Grymes, Douglas Tennessee 

Hardesty, John R Florida 



80 SPRI NG HILL COLLEGE 

•V Harrison, Alfred L Florida 

Hatcher, Reginald W., Jr. Georgia 

Hayles, Alvin B Alabama 

Hazel, Guy W., Jr.. Kentucky 

Helmsing, Joseph H. Alabama 

Henderson, Kenneth E. Alabama 

Henderson, William Ware, Jr Alabama 

Henry, John R. Mississippi 

Herndon, Robin C., Jr Alabama 

Holliman, Herbert H Alabama 

Holmes, William R Alabama 

Hope, John C., Jr Alabama 

4 de la Houssaye, Alvin G Louisiana 

Houssiere, Jules Louisiana 

Howard, Karl N Alabama 

Hyde, William J., Jr. Alabama 

Hyland, Norman D Alabama 

^Hymel, Lynn Louisiana 

Jarvis, Andrew W .- Alabama 

Johnston, Wellington H Alabama 

^ Jaubert, M. Y. Lousiana 

Kelly, Donald Alabama 

Kemp, William B., Jr Alabama 

\r Kerrigan, Thomas Tennessee 

Kilborn, Vincent F Alabama 

a Krumeich, Edward E Ohio 

Lanaux, Thomas L. Alabama 

^Lange, Charles E Texas 

Lavretta, John L., Jr Alabama 

Lawler, John C, Jr Alabama 

it* Lawley, Eugene Alabama 

>LeCompte, Eugene Louisiana 

^Leftwich, Robert C. Louisiana 

Liebeskind, Milton M New Jersey 

Long, Henry L Alabama i 

Marshall, John S., Jr Alabama 

> Martin, C. P Louisiana 

Martin, Ed Oklahoma 

Martin, . Harold P ..Alabama 

; Martin, Joe Oklahoma * 

Mayeux, Lance James Louisiana 



CATALOGUE 81 



McConaghy, Charles ' .. Alabama 

M'cCowan, Edwin Tyson , Alabama 

McCown, Lawrence Alabama 

McDonald, Daniel J Alabama *"" 

j McEllin, James Burke Georgia 

McE'voy, L. Carle - Missouri 

Melsheimer, Edwin S ....Mississippi 

Miller, Bertrand A. Alabama 

Miller, C. W Alabama 

Miller, Charles Tennessee 

Miller, Harold Crenshaw Alabama 

Minondo, Manuel A .....Puerto Rico 

Moore, Michael - Alabama 

Moseley, Charles M. J Louisiana^ 

Mudd, Dayton H., Jr ..* Missouri 

Norville, Richard G Alabama 

O'Rourke, Michael Franci: Alabama 

O'Shea, Starks Mississippi 

Palmes, Ed Alabama 

Palmes, Jack Alabama 

Pappas, Earle Alabama 

Partridge, William T. Alabama 

Pennington, Julius A Alabama 

Phelan, William J. Florida **" 

Phillips, Charles W Illinois 

Pilkington, Albert J Alabama 

Plauche, Thomas J Louisiana 

Powell, Marion .. Alabama 

* Power, Dan Tennessee' 

Pringle, Milton B Alabama 

Quint, Edwin Louis Alabama 

Reeves, Leslie Howard Louisiana 

4 Reilly, James B Georgia 

Repoll, John, Jr. Alabama ** — 

j- Robertson, Harold Allen Kentucky 

j Roell, Leroy Charles Mississippi 

.: Roney, Herbert Illinois 

Rutherford, Jack Alabama 

^Ryan, Edmund V Georgia' 



£ 4 



82 SPRING HILL COLLEGE 

Saul, Thomas L .. Georgia 

I Saul, William H., Jr > Georgia 

Seifert, Lee Roe.. Alabama 

Seifert, Marshall Alabama 

Sigler, Charles W. New Jersey 

. Simpson, Francis H Mississippi 

Sitterle, Julius Alabama 

,->■ Skeffington, Francis Georgia 

Slaughter, Carl Alabama 

Smith, Walter Alabama 

Spellman, William T.__ Georgia 

Stanard, William Douglas Alabama 

Steely, Thomas A., Jr Alabama 

Sutherland, Eugene C. Georgia 

I Switzer, John E Louisiana 

Tacon, Avelin P., Jr : ...Alabama 

Talbott, John Daniel, Jr. Kentucky 

Talbott, William R., Jr Kentucky 

Tarantino, John J Georgia 

Thompson, M. Carey, Jr Louisiana 

Thompson, E. Leroy Alabama 

Thompson, J. B., Jr. - Georgia 

Traynor, C. E., Jr. Georgia 

Hr" 

Vonesh, Otto Charles Illinois 

4 Walker, Fred Earl, Jr. Alabama 

Waller, Charlie L., Jr. Alabama 

Waller, Shannon Alabama 

Walsh, Daniel C Louisiana 

Walsh, Thomas D. Alabama 

* Webb, Buckner G ..Alabama 

Weinacker, Robert M., Jr Alabama 

I Wettermark, Alfred B Louisiana 

4 Wilds, Charles E., Jr Louisiana 

Wilson, Louie Alabama 

* Wines, J. Judson Florida 

Wood, George F Alabama 

Wulff, Donald E . Alabama 

Zalumas, Jack (Georgia 

Zieman, Edward Alabama 

Zieman, Jack Alabama' 



CATALOGUE 



83 



PART TIME CLASSES 



1934-35 



Mr. L. F. Akridge 

Mr. William E. Akridge, Jr. 

Miss Eulalie Andrews 

Miss Marta Karin Armsden 

Miss Mary Nan Bagwell 

Mr. Edgar Barre 

Miss Freddie Bateman 

Miss Alyne Blackwell 

Mrs. Dorothy West Blum 

Mr. Bernard A. Bobe 

Miss Janice Bolen 

Mr. E. H. Boykin 

Miss Grace L. Brandon 

Mr. Charles A. Brown 

Miss Elizabeth Buckley 

Miss Louveta Cain 

Mr. Owen Calvin Cain 

Miss Miriam Calhoun 

Miss Harriet Casper 

Miss Anita Cassidy 

Mr. Bill Caton 

Mrs. Eva Lee Caviezel 

Miss Sarah Chapman 

Miss Adele Cometti 

Miss Margaret Connick 

Mr. Edwin M. Cox 

Miss Margaret Crane 

Mr. James Crow 

Miss Eileen Mae Currie 

Mrs. May A. Davenport 

Mr. P. E. Dewitt 

Miss Inez Doby 

Miss Cassie D'Olive 

Miss Mary Douglas 

Miss, Margaret Dubrock 

Miss Glendine Duke 

Miss Kethie Edge 

Miss Alma Farnell 

Miss Victoria Flechas 

Miss Alice Fowler 

Miss Annie Gartman 



Miss Elizabeth Green 

Miss Mary Green 

Miss Genevieve Greenwood 

Mrs. Lillian Dreaper Grove 

Miss Ouida Guice 

Mrs. Emma C. Harris 

Miss Ouida Hartin 

Miss Eva Haselmaier 

Miss Kathleen Haselmaier 

Miss Beatrice Havens 

Mr. Charles Hoffman 

Miss Una Hughes 

Miss Elsie J. Jane 

Miss Genevieve Jarvis 

Mrs. Maude Jenson 

Miss Petrina Jetmundsen 

Mrs. E. J. Johnson 

Miss Nellie Judge 

Miss Modesta Keoughan 

Miss Mary Lee Kilgore 

Miss Helen Kowaleski 

Miss Ora Lee Ladnier 

Miss Eola Lane 

Miss Ethel Langham 

Miss Gertrude Lanicek 

Mrs. Ruth Laubenthal 

Miss Lois Leslie 

Miss M. Virginia Libbey 

Miss Bessie Lyle 

Miss Eunice Mallett 

Miss Jewel Malete 

Miss Clara Mayhall 

Miss Mary Elizabeth McAleer 

Mis s Aileen McCain 

Miss Jamie Augusta McCord 

Miss A. B. McCorvey 

Miss Anna Mary McCreary 

Miss Atha McGehee 

Miss Edna Eloise IMcGill 

Miss Margaret Mcllwain 

Miss Hazel McMullen 



84 



SPRING HILL COLLEGE 



Miss Opal Merifield 
Miss Reba Mills 
Miss Tallulah Moore 
Miss Mary Leona Morgan 
Miss Kate Moslander 
Miss Rena Murphy- 
Miss Lillian Nail 
Miss Ruth Sigrid Nelson 
Miss Dorothy Noel 
Mr. Marshall N. Oliver 
Miss Marie Olson 
Miss Marguerite d'Ornellas 
Miss Virginia d'Ornellas 
Miss Gertrude Cecilia O'Rourke 
Miss Bessie Lee Parnelle 
Miss Frances Parrish 
Mrs. Linnie B. Pooley 
Mis s Aline Posey 
Miss Celestine Pratt 
Miss Bertha Pullen 
Miss Clara Reaves 
Miss Irene Reilly 
Mr. Bill Roberts 
Mrs. Lily Rouse 
Miss Adeline Rush 
Mr. Edwin L. Schettler 
Miss Helen Scott 



Miss Mildred Shuman 

Miss Celestine Sibley 

Miss Marguerite Smith 

iMiss Marjorie Smith 

Mr. Philip N. Sowell 

Miss Abbie Strachan 

Miss Olene Strength 

Miss Jean Taube 

Mr. William Russell Thompson 

Mr. Lyman Toulmin, Jr. 

Miss Avon Turner 

Miss Margaret Unruh 

/Miss Virginia Unruh 

Miss Lillian A. Vaughan 

Miss Theresa Orestes Wackerle 

Miss Bernice Wainwright 

Miss LaVerne Watts 

Miss Vivienne Waller 

Miss Florence Wheeler 

Miss Agnes Wilikie 

Miss Mary Lou White 

iMiss Gertrude Williams 

Mr. Cowan E. Woodham 

Miss Catherine R. Yeend 

Miss Fidelis Yeend 

Miss Mildred Yousko 

Miss Gwendolyn Yniestra 



SISTERS OF THE HOLY GHOST 
Sister Mary Edna Sister Mary Augustine 

SISTERS OF LORETTO 



Sister Teresa Agnes 
Sister Gerald Marie 



Sister Mary Cecelia 



SISTERS OF MERCY 



Sister Mary Agnes 
Sister Mary Celina 



Sister Mary Regis 

Sister Mary Teresa Agnes 



CATALOGUE 



85 



SUMMER SESSION 
1934 



Mr. Charles Akridge 
Mr. Francis, Andrews 
Miss Grace L. Brandon 
Mrs. J. H. Cowan 
Mrs. Catherine DeVan 
iMiss Alice Fowler 
Miss Janice Fry 
Mr. Victor Geld 
Miss Elizabeth Green 
Mr. Henry P. Griggs, S. J. 
Mrs. A. G. Harrington 
Mrs. Emma C. Harris 
Mr. Joseph H. Helmsing 
Mr. Kenneth E. Henderson 
Mr. John Henry 
Miss Genevieve Jarvis 
Miss Petrina Jetmundsen 
Mrs. E. J. Johnson 
Miss Lillian Kamphius 



Miss Modista Keoughan 

Miss Beryl Kirk 

Miss Margaret d'Ornellas, ' 

Miss Virginia d'Ornellas 

Mrs. H. E. Parsons 

Mr. Charles Phillips 

Mrs. Lily Rouse 

Mr. Julius Sitterle 

Miss Marguerite Smith 

Miss Vera Stroecker 

Miss Hazel Turner 

Mrs. C. B. Vaughan 

Miss Genevieve Walsh 

iMiss Alice Webb 

Mr. Robert M. Weinacker, Jr- 

Miss Catherine Yeend 

Miss Fidelis Yeend 

Miss Mildred Yousko 



BROTHERS OF THE SACRED HEART 



Brother Albert 
Brother Benet 
Brother Bernadine 
Brother Boris 
Brother Casimir 
Brother David 
Brother Edmund 
Brother Ephrem 



Brother Eugene 
Brother Howard 
Brother Hugh 
Brother Julian 
Brother Roger 
Brother Roland 
Brother Wilbert 



SISTERS OF MERCY 



Sister Mary Ambrose 
Sister Mary Antonia 
Sister Mary Austin 
Sister Mary Bernadette 
Sister Mary Bernadine 
Sister Mary Bernard 
Sister Mary Borgia 
Sister Mary de Chantel 
Sister Mary Francisca 



Sister Mary Gabrielle 
Sister iMary Helena 
Sister Mary Isadore 
Sister Mary Loretta 
Sister Mary Monica 
Sister Mary Regis 
Sister Mary de Sales 
Sister Mary Vincentia 



INDEX 

GENERAL CATALOGUE 

Page 

Administration _ 14 

Admission 21 

Alumni Associations - 71 

Attendance ..- 14 

Calendar 3 

Certificate in Education 25 

Class Roll - 

Credentials 21 

Degrees 23, 24, 25 

Discipline 15 

Examinations ...., 15 

Expenses 17 

General Statement 8 

Grounds and Buildings 9 

Historical Statement 6 

Location -- 6 

Objectives - - 12 

Officers of Instruction and Administration 5 and 6 

Prizes 78 

Register of Students 75 

Remarks on Regular Courses 34 

Requirements for Graduation - 23 

Schedule of Regular Courses 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33 

Student Organizations 6 $ 

Special Students - 22 

Subjects in Course 36 

System of Education - H 

Transcript of Record - 17 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 
1936-1937 

1936 

Sept. 8— Registration. 

Sept. 9 — First classes of the session. 

Sept. 18 — Fine for late registration. 

Sept. 19 — Last day for conditioned examinations of previous 
session. 

Sept. 21 — Mass of the Holy Ghost. 

Nov. 1— Feast of All Saints. 

Nov. 11 — Armistice Day. Holiday. 

Nov. 12 — Annual Requiem Mass for deceased faculty and stu- 
dents. 

Nov. 26-27 — Thanksgiving Holidays. 

Dec. 8 — Feast of the Immaculate Conception. Holiday. 

Dec. 18 — Freshman Dance. 

Dec. 22 — Christmas Holidays begin after 10 o'clock classes. 

1937 

Jan. 5 — All Classes resume. 

Jan. 8— Phi Omega Dance. 

Jan. 18 — Beginning of semester examinations; registration for 

the second semester. 

Jan. 25 — First classes of the second semester. 

Feb. 3 — Fine fpr late registration. 

March 8-9 — Shrovetide holidays. 

March 15 — Annual retreat begins. 

March 19 — Feast of St. Joseph, Patron of the College. 

March 24 — Easter recess begins. 

March 30 — All classes resume. 

April 1 — Senior Theses due. 

April 2 — Omicron Sigma Dance. 

May 7 — Sophomores file Program of Major and Minors for 

graduation. 

May 23 — Baccalaureate Sunday. 

May 25 — Commencement exercises. 

May 29 — Second semester ends. 



Trustees of the Corporation 

Very Rev. John J. Druhan, s.j., Chairman 

Rev. Michael J. Cronin, s.j., Secretary 

Rev. John V. DeigNan, s.j. 

Rev. Theodore A. Ray, s.j. 

Rev. Andrew C. Smith, s.j. 

Corporate title : The President and Trustees of the Spring Hill 

College, in the County of Mobile, Alabama 



Board of Governors of the Spring Hill 
College Foundation 

This board, organized in 1931, is responsible for the supervision and 

administration of the endowment fund of the College. 

Very Rev. John J. Druhan, s.j., Chairman 

Rev. George G. McHardy, s.j. 

Thomas M. Stevens, ll.d. 

J. M. Walsh 

Matthias M. Mahorner, a.m., ll.b., ll.d. 

David R. Dunlap 

Very Rev. Joseph M. Walsh, s.j. 



Administrative Officers of the College 
1935-1936 

Very Rev. John J. Druhan, s.j., President 

Rev. Andrew C. Smith, s.j., Dean and Prefect of Studies 

Rev. George !T. Day, s.j., Prefect of Discipline 

Rev. David R. Lorig, s.j., Student Counsellor 

Rev. Theodore A. Ray, s.j., Treasurer 

Rev. Michael J. Cronin, s.j., Supt. of Buildings and Grounds 

Rev. George G. McHardy, s.j., Business Manager 

Louis J. Boudousquie, b.s., Registrar 

Marie Yvonne Jaubert, a.b., m.a., b.l.s., Librarian 

Norborne R. Clarke, jr., a.b., m.a., m.d., Director of 

Student Health Service 

Standing Committees of tne Faculty 

Committee on Admissions and Degrees 

The Dean, the Registrar, Rev. Patrick H. Yancey, s.j., Professor 
Kermit T. Hart, Professor Louis L. Sulya. 

Committee on Athletics 

Rev. J. Lambert Dorn, s.j., Professor Michael J. Donahue, Pro- 
fessor William T. Daly 

Committee on Curricular Problems 

Rev. Patrick H. Yancey, s.j., Rev. William F. Obering, s.j., Rev, 
John Hutchins, s.j., Professor L. E. Loveridge. 

Committee on Examinations 

Rev. John V. Deignan, s.j., Rev. Francis L. Janssen, s.j., Rev. 
William A. Mulherin, s.j., Mr. Cecil Lang, s.j. 

Committee on Student Activities 

Rev. David R. Lorig, s.j., Rev. George T. Day, s.j., Mr. Wm. 
Crandell, s.j., Mr. Louis Twomey, s.j. 

Committee on Student Discipline 

Rev. George T. Day, s.j., Mr. Wm. Crandell, s.j., Mr. Wm. Pat- 
rick Donnelly, s.j., Mr. Cecil Lang, s.j., Mr. John Schwing, s.j., 
Mr. Louis J. Twomey, s.j. 

Committee on Publications 

Rev. Charles J. Quirk, s.j., Mr. Wm. Patrick Donnelly, s.j., Pro- 
fessor Edgar Barre. 



Officers of Instruction 

Edgar Barre, Instructor in Commerce 

Commercial certificate, St. Joseph's College, 1911. 

Instructor, St. Paul's College, Covington, La., 1911-1918; Instructor, 
Spring Hill High School, 1918-1921; Registrar, Spring Hill College, 1927- 
1928; Secretary to the President and Instructor in Commerce, 1928- 

Louis J. Boudousquie, b.s., Registrar, Professor of Drawing, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., Spring Hill, 1917; Cand. M.S., Auburn. 

Instructor in Mathematics, McGill Institute, Mobile, 1921-1928; Regis- 
trar, Professor of Drawing, Associate Professor of Mathematics, 
Spring Hill, 1928- 

O. L. Chason, b.s., m.d., dr.p.h., Special Lecturer in Sociology 
B.S., University of Alabama, 1923; M.D. Tulane University, 
1925; M.P.H., Harvard, 1930; Dr.P.H., Harvard, 1934. 

Health Officer, Mobile, 1934- ; Special Lecturer in Public Health, Spring 
Hill College, Night Classes, 1936. 

A. William Crandell, s.j., a.m., Instructor in Political Science and 
Greek 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1932; A.M., 1933. 

Instructor in Civics, Latin, and Greek, Spring Hill High School 1933-35. 

Edward Victor Cupero, mus.d., Professor of Music, Director of 
Band, Orchestra, and Glee Club 
B.Mus., Royal Conservatory, Naples, 1896; Mus.D., 1898. 

Conductor, Baltimore Symphony, 1915; Conductor Aibany Symphony 
Orchestra, 1933-1934; Professor of Music, Spring Hill, 1934- 

William Thomas Daly, ph.b., Professor of Economics; Instructor 
in Physical Education, Coach, Football, Baseball 
Ph.B., Holy Cross College, Worcester, Mass., 1920. 

Instructor in Business Administration, St. Charles College, Grand Co- 
teau, La., 1920-1922; Instructor and Director of Athletics, Jesuit High 
School, New Orleans, La., 1922-1923; Instructor of Economics and 
Physical Education, Loyola University, New Orleans, 1923-1925; As- 
sistant Professor of Economics, Director of Physical Education, Spring 
Hill College, 1925-1931; Professor of Economics, Coach, 1935- 

Reverend John Vincent Deignan, s.j., a.m., ph.d., Professor of 
Chemistry, and Head of the Department 
A.B., National University, Dublin, 1907; A.M., Woodstock College, 
1917; Ph.D., Fordham University, 1929. 

Instructor in Chemistry, Spring Hill College, 1917-1922; Professor, and 
Head of the Department, 1929- 

Michael Joseph Donahue, a.b., Director of Athletics, Associate 
Professor of Economics and Physical Education, Asst. Coach 
A.B., Yale, 1904. 

Instructor in Athletics, Yale, Summers, 1905-1907; Athletic Director, 
Professor of Physical Education, Auburn, 1905-1923; Director of Ath- 
letics, Riverside (Ga.) Summer School, 1919-1921; Athletic Director and 
Professor of Physical Education, Louisiana State University, 1923-1928; 
Spring Hill, 1930- 

William Patrick Donnelly, s.j., a.m., Instructor in History and 
Education 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1932; A.M., 1934. 

Instructor in History and Latin, 1934-35; Instructor in History and 
Education, Spring Hill, 1935- 



Reverend Joseph Lambert Dorn, s.j.,am., Professor of Education 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1924; A.M., 1925. 

Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1925-1928; Director of 
Athletics, 1926-1928; Director of Athletics, and Professor of Education, 
Spring Hill, 1934- ; Prefect of Discipline, 1934-1935. 

Elizabeth Myrtle Enderle, a.b., Instructor in History and Prin- 
ciples of Art 

A.B., Tulane University, 1932. 

Instructor in Art 'Education, Daphne State Teachers College, 1924-1931; 
Instructor of Art Classes, Barton Academy, 1926-1931; Spring Hill 
College, 1935- 

Kermit Thomas Hart, b.s.b.a., Professor in Accounting and Busi- 
ness Administration; Head of the Department of Commerce 

B.S.B.A., University of Florida, 1927. 

Instructor, American Institute of Banking, Mobile Chapter, 1929-1934; 
Instructor in Accounting and Business Administration, Spring Hill 
College, 1928-1929; Professor, Head of the Department of Commerce, 
1929- 

Reverend John A. Hutchins, s.j., a.m., Professor of French 
A.B., Woodstock College, 1911; A.M„ 1912. 

Instructor, St. Boniface High School, Winnipeg, Canada, 1913-1916; 
Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1920-1921; Spring Hill High School, 
1925-1927; Professor of French, Spring Hill College, 1927- 

Reverend Francis Louis Janssen, s.j., a.m., Professor of German, 
and Head of the Department of Languages 
A.B., Loyola University, New Orleans, 1920; A.M., Gonzaga Uni- 
versity, 1922. 

Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1924-1925; Professor of French, 
Loyola University, New Orleans, 1929-1932; Regent of Arts and 
Sciences, 1931-1932; Professor of Modern and Ancient Languages, 
Spring Hill College, 1932- ; Head of the Department, 1934- 

Reverend Michael Kenny, s.j., a.m., ph.d., litt.d., Professor 
Emeritus of Philosophy 

E. Cecil Lang, s.j., a.m., Instructor in Mathematics 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1932; A.M., 1933; Graduate Work, St. 
Louis University, 1935. 

Instructor in Biology, Spring Hill, 1933-1934; Instructor in Mathe- 
matics, Spring Hill, 1934- 

Guy Joseph Lemieux, s.j., a.m., Instructor in English 

A.B., Loyola University, New Orleans, 1930; A.M., St. Louis Uni- 
versity, 1934. 

Reverend David R. Lorig, s.j., a.m., Professor of Religion and 
Head of Department 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1924; A.M., 1925. 

Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1925-1927; Jesuit High School, New 
Orleans, 1927-1928; Student Counsellor and Instructor, St. John's High 
School, Shreveport, La., 1932-1933; Student Counsellor, Jesuit High 
School, New Orleans, 1934-1935; Student Counsellor, Professor of Re- 
ligion and Head of the Department, 1935- 



Lawrence Earle Loveridge, b.s., m.a., ph.d., Professor of Physics 
and Mathematics 
B.S., University of Oregon, 1927; M.A., University of California, 
1929; Ph.D., 1931. 

Teaching Fellow in Physics, University of California, 1927-1931; Re- 
search Physicist in Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie 
Institution of Washington, 1931-1932; Professor of Mathematics, Seton 
Hall College, 1932-1935; Spring Hill, 1935- 

Jose Martinez, a.b., b.s., ph.lic., Professor of Spanish 
A.B., B.S., Institute Nacional CC de Madrid, 1914; Ph. Lie, Uni- 
versidad Central de Madrid, 1919. 

Professor of Languages, Elizabeth town College, 1926-1929; Instructor in 
Spanish Language and Literature, University of Notre Dame, 1929-1931; 
Professor of Spanish (Extension), Indiana University, 1929-1931; Ci- 
vilian Instructor, U. S. Military Academy, 1931-1935; Spring Hill, 1936- 

Reverend William Austin Mulherin, s.j., a.m., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Philosophy and Professor of Psychology 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1921; A.M., 1922. 

Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1922-1925; Principal, 1929-1930; 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Spring Hill College, 1931-1932; As- 
sociate Professor, 1932- ; Professor of Psychology, 1935- 

Joseph Otto Muscat, m.d., Associate Professor of Biology 

M.D., St. Louis University, School of Medicine, 1931. 
Lecturer in Anatomy, Spring Hill, 1935- 

Reverend William F. Obering, s.j., a.m., ph.d., Professor of 
Ethics and Sociology; Head of the Department of Philosophy 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1909; A.M., 1910; Ph.D., Fordham 
University, 1930. 

Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1907-1908; St. Charles College High 
School, Grand Coteau, La., 1910-1913; Assistant Professor of Phil- 
osophy, St. Charles College, 1918-1919; Loyola University, New Orleans, 
La., 1919-1920; Instructor in English, History, and Classics, Spring 
Hill, 1920-1927; Associate Professor of Philosophy, 1927-1928; Professor 
and Head of Department, 1930- 

Reverend Charles Joaquin Quirk, s.j., a.m., Professor, and Head 
of the Department of English 
A.B., Georgetown College, 1923; A.M., Columbia University, 1931. 

Instructor, St. Charles College, Grand Coteau, La., 1915-1920; Pro- 
fessor of English Literature, Spring Hill, 1925- ; Lecturer in English 
Poetry, St. Louis University, Summer Session, 1935. 

John Elmer Schwing, s.j., a.m., Instructor in Latin and Greek 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1933; A.M., 1935. 

Reverend Andrew Cannon Smith, s.j., a.m., ph.d., Dean, Asso- 
ciate Professor of English Literature 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1923; A.M., Catholic University, 1930; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1934. 

Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1923-24; Assistant Professor of English 
Literature, Loyola University, New Orleans, 1931-1932; Dean and Asso- 
ciate Professor of English, Spring Hill College, 1934- ; Director of 
Summer Session, 1934, 1935. 

Louis Leon Sulya, b.s., m.s., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Holy Cross College, 1932; M.S., 1933. 

Graduate Assistant in Chemistry, Holy Cross, 1932-1933; Instructor in 
Chemistry, Spring Hill, 1934-1935; Associate Professor, 1935- 



Louis Joseph Twomey, s.j., a.m., Instructor in English and Public 

Speaking 

A.B., Loyola University, New Orleans, 1931; A.M., St. Louis 

University, 1933. 

Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1933- ; Coach of Debating Team, 1934- 

Reverend Patrick Henry Yancey, s.j., a.m., ph.d., Professor of 
Biology and Head of the Department 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1918; A.M., 1919; Ph.D., St. Louis 
University, 1931. 

Instructor in Biology, Spring Hill, 1919-1923; Instructor in Biology, St. 
Louis University, 1930-1931; Professor of Biology and Head of the De- 
partment, Spring Hill, 1931- 



Otner Officers 

Edgar Barre, Secretary to the President 

Joseph G. Tyrrell, Assistant Treasurer 

Brother Martial Lapeyre, s.j., Dietitian 

Mrs. Albert Levet, r.n., Director of the Infirmary 

C. W. Miller, Secretary to the Dean 

Marshall Seifert, Assistant Registrar 

Clifford Louisell, Library Attendant 



Student Assistants 

Accounting: Harold G. Allen 

Biology: Milton Liebeskind 

Chemistry: Briesten Fulford, Alvin B. Hayles 

Physics: Breen Bland 

Library: Francis J. Andrews, Charles Breland, Warren Breneman, 

Adolph Elsevier, John Lawler, Charles McConaghy, Harold 

Martin, James Rogers, Thomas Steely. 



Spring Hill College 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Historical Sketch 

The first Bishop of Mobile, the Right Reverend Michael Portier, 
d.d., laid the cornerstone of the first building of Spring Hill College 
on July 4, 1830. It stood on the site of the present Administration 
Building and was opened for classes in November, 1831. Five years 
later, the Governor of Alabama signed the legislative bill which 
chartered the Bishop's seminary-college and gave it "full power to 
grant or confer such degree or degrees in the arts and sciences, or in 
any art or science ... as are usually granted or conferred by other 
seminaries of learning in the United States." This power was used in 
the following year, 1837, when four graduates received their degrees. 
Spring Hill thus takes its place among the three oldest colleges in the 
South, while of Jesuit Boarding Colleges, it is the oldest after George- 
town. 

As the years went on and the college enrollment rose from thirty 
to more than a hundred, the Bishop found it more and more difficult 
to provide from the limited personnel of his missionary clergy the 
necessary minimum of priest-teachers and administrators. The first 
two Presidents of Spring Hill were called away to be Bishops, one 
of Dubuque (Bishop Loras), the other of Vincennes (Bishop Bazin), 
and the third, Father Mauvernay died after a very brief term of office. 
Reluctantly, Bishop Portier was compelled to transfer his college to 
a newly arrived French Congregation, the Fathers of Mercy. With 
little or no experience in teaching, these zealous missionaries found 
the direction of Spring Hill a thankless task and gave it up after two 
years. A similar experiment with the Eudists succeeded no better, and 
in 1845 the College suspended operations, pending some new arrange- 
ment. 

In this crisis the Lyons province of the Society of Jesus was per- 
suaded to take over Spring Hill, and the new regime was inaugurated 
with Father Francis Gautrelet, s.j., as President, in September, 1847. 
Since that time through many vicissitudes, the Jesuit Fathers have 
directed the policies of the college and endeavored to make it a center 
of liberal culture. During the Civil War studies continued without 
interruption, but a costly fire in 1869 destroyed the main building and 
required the removal of students and faculty to St. Charles College, 
Grand Coteau, Louisiana. 'Through the generous aid of many friends, 
particularly Bishop Quinlan, "the second founder," a new building 
rose on the site of the old and the new Spring Hill opened its doors. 

Until 1921 the High School and College Departments were not 
perfectly separate in organization and faculty, but after that date, a 
more clear-cut division was noticeable. Within a few years new build- 
ings arose on the western side of the campus, and thither the college 
removed for classes and recreation. With the close of the term in 1935, 

10 



Spring Hill College 

the High School department was discontinued, and the whole plant 
thus given over to the needs of the college.* 

Situation 

The college campus occupies some 700 acres of the elevation which 
gives its name to this residential suburb of Mobile. The city and Bay 
are both visible from the hill and easily accessible either by street car 
line or by the famous Old Shell Road, which passes the college gates. 
The village of Spring Hill has a post office, but no railroad station. 
The prospective student or visitor will therefore come first to Mobile, 
a beautiful city of the Old South, now nationally famous for its 
"Azalea Trail." 

Spring Hill is on the Azalea Trail, just six miles from the center 
of the city. The natural beauty of its well-chosen site, adorned with 
an almost endless variety of trees and shrubs and flowers, its lake, its 
shaded avenues, and the striking setting of its athletic fields and its 
buildings make the campus one of the most attractive in the United 
States. 

Owing to its altitude and to the invigorating influence of its resin- 
ous pines upon the surrounding atmosphere, Spring Hill holds one 
of the best records for health in the country. The air is pure and 
bracing, and even in the hottest summer months, the temperature, 
thanks to the nearby Gulf, is usually several degrees lower than in the 
neighboring city. The mildness of the climate all the year round makes 
it possible for outdoor sports to continue without interruption. 

Buildings 

The Administration Building stands on the site of the first building 
which Bishop Portier erected for his pioneer college. The present 
plant, erected partly in 1869, partly in 1909, to replace the damage 
caused by historic fires, is a brick structure several hundred feet in 
length and three stories high. Covered Spanish colonnades join it to 
the Dining Hall on the west, the Infirmary on the east, and the 
Chapel on the north. The building itself is occupied by the Faculty 
and the administrative offices. Class-rooms are also located in this 
building. 

The Infirmary Building is the only building in present use which 
antedates the fire of 1869. On the first floor is located the pharmacy 
under the charge of a resident nurse; and the rooms on the second 
floor are equipped to take care of all ordinary cases of illness. 



♦Those interested in the full story of the first hundred years of Spring 
Hill should read Kenny, M., "Catholic Culture in Alabama" (Centenary 

History of Spring Hill College). New York: America Press, 1931. 

• . 

11 



Spring Hill College 

The Refectory Building across the quadrangle from the Infirmary 
contains the dining halls for faculty and students. The faculty hall 
upstairs is brightened by the painting which Napoleon's uncle, Card- 
inal Fesch, presented to his friend, Bishop Portier for his new college. 
The students' dining room is panelled in dark oak and decorated with 
the seal of St. Ignatius Loyola. 

The College Chapel, dedicated to the Patron of the College, St. 
Joseph, was built in 1910. It is modified Gothic in style, and beauti- 
fully appointed within. 

Yenni Hall, erected and named in memory of Father Dominic Yenni, 
s. j., Professor of Latin and Greek at Spring Hill for over fifty years, 
and author of Yenni's Latin and Greek Grammars, is entirely de- 
voted to Science. Here are installed on different floors the Physics, 
Chemistry, and Biology lecture rooms and laboratories, and the 
Seismographic Station. 

The Thomas Byrne Memorial Library, the newest building on the 
campus, is the gift of Mrs. Byrne in memory of her husband and son. 
It was completed in 1930. It has room for 150,000 volumes. The gen- 
eral reading room is large enough to accommodate 200 students at 
one time. There are besides smaller rooms for research and conference, 
and one large lecture room. A special section of the building contains 
the Lavretta Library, donated by Mr. L. C. Lavretta, a Mobile 
alumnus. 

The College Inn is a recreation center midway between the golf course 
and Mobile Hall. It contains a dance-hall, billiard room, and a 
fraternity meeting-room. 

The Gymnasium is located in a building just west of the Dining Hall. 
It contains a basket-ball court, locker rooms, and showers. Next door 
is the Auditorium. 

Quinlan Hall is the name given to the long corridor of rooms, built 
over the Gymnasium- Auditorium Building in 1916, and named in 
honor of Spring Hill's second founder, Bishop Quinlan. There are 
40 living rooms in the building, each equipped with clothes-press and 
lavatory. 

Mobile Hall is the newest dormitory building. Dedicated November 
6, 1927, it gave a new center to the college campus. Built on modern 
lines and with ample provision for the future growth of the college, 
it has space and equipment for housing over 200 students. Tempor- 
arily some of the rooms on the first floor have been arranged as offices 
and class rooms. The living-rooms in this building are bright and 
airy, and provided with every modern convenience. 

The Stadium. The growing importance of athletics was recognized in 
1935 by the erection on beautiful Maxon Field of a long-needed 
stadium. It is built to accommodate 4000 spectators and equipped 
with floodlights for night football. 

12 



Spring Hill College 

Scholastic Standing 

The scholastic standing of Spring Hill as a "grade A" college is 
attested by the fact that it is a member of, affiliated with, or approved 
by the following educational organizations : 

The Jesuit Educational Association 

The National Catholic Educational Association 

The Association of American Colleges 

The Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

The Alabama College Association 

The University of Alabama 

The State Department of Education 

The Dixie Athletic Conference ! 

Statement of Objectives 

Ultimate Objective 

As a Jesuit Liberal Arts College, Spring Hill has the same primary 
purpose as the Catholic educational system taken in its entirety. This 
is best expressed in the words of Pope Pius XI : "The proper and im- 
mediate end of Christian education is to cooperate with divine grace 
in forming the true and perfect Christian, that is, to form Christ 
Himself in those regenerated by baptism. . . The true Christian, pro- 
duct of Christian education, is the supernatural man who thinks, 
judges and acts constancy and consistently in accordance with right 
reason, illumined by the supernatural light of the example and teach- 
ing of Christ; in other words, to use the current term, the true and 
finished man of character." 

Immediate Objectives 

It is in terms of this end that the Jesuit College of Liberal Arts 
conceives its special function in contemporary American life. Ob- 
viously, then, it will not neglect the field of religion. Instruction in 
Catholic faith and morals will always be a part of its task. But it is 
not the whole. The Jesuit college by its traditions can never be con- 
tent with simply presenting Catholicism as a creed, a code or cult. It 
must strive to communicate the riches of Catholicism as a culture, thus 
giving the modern man a coign of vantage whence to view with under- 
standing not merely the facts in the natural order, but those in the 
supernatural order also, those facts which give meaning and co- 
herence to the whole life. 

Jesuit education regards the college of liberal arts as the heart of 
its system. It is through the instrumentality of such colleges that 
Catholic leaders will be formed, men and women who have been 
trained spiritually and intelligently in the Catholic sense, who have 
intelligent and appreciative contact with Catholicism as a culture, 
who through their general education in the college of arts have so de- 

13 



Spring Hill College 

veloped their powers of mind and heart and will that they can take 
an active part in the service of Church and society. 

The Jesuit college in its teaching aims at reaching the whole man, 
his intellect, his will, his emotions, his senses, his imagination, his 
aesthetic sensibilities, his memory, and his powers of expression. It 
seeks to lift up man's whole being to that broad, spiritual outlook on 
life whereby he not only understands and appreciates the fact that our 
entire social heritage is bound up with the Truth, Goodness and 
Beauty of God as seen in Revelation, Nature, Art, and Language, but 
is likewise willing and ready to become identified with those activities, 
individual as well as collective, that make for the sanctification of 
the individual and the betterment of society. 

The Jesuit college strives to provide a broad foundation in general 
education, upon which advanced study in a special field may be 
built. 

In addition to these objectives held in common with all Jesuit 
colleges, Spring Hill aims by proper direction in the choice of elec- 
tive studies to prepare her graduates for successful work in profes- 
sional schools and in business. 

The Government and Welfare of the Students 

The Discipline 

Spring Hill is committed to the belief that a system of education 
which discounts the formation of character is pernicious. For this 
reason opportunity is given to learn the important lesson of obedience 
to salutary laws and restraints. Everywhere necessary for ordered 
living, discipline is imperative when restless youths are forming a 
community of their own, as they do in a boarding school. Whatever 
the age of the students, and their opinion of their abilities to shape 
their own lives, the authorities of the school feel for their charges the 
responsibility of a parent. Rules are therefore made governing the 
out-of-class life of the students, particularly their social activities 
and absences from the campus. These rules and the sanctions for 
their observance are made known to the student from the beginning. 
Their enforcement, while considerate, is unflinchingly firm. 

Naturally, in addition to minor breaches of college discipline, there 
occur at times serious offenses which require drastic punishment, 
even suspension or dismissal from college. Such are: serious insub- 
ordination, repeated violation of regulations, neglect of studies, pos- 
session or use of intoxicating liquors, habitual use of obscene or 
profane language, and in general any serious form of immorality. In 
case of the suspension or dismissal of a student for such reasons, the 
tuition fee is not refunded. 

Without committing any overt act of the kind described in the 
preceding paragraph, a student may at times by constant and ill- 
founded criticism, or an habitual attitude of opposition to the college 
government become an undesirable member of the community. For 

14 



Spring Hill College 

such cases the college reserves the right to request any student to 
withdraw from school, with, however, an honorable dismissal, and 
the refund of such fees as may be refundable by the treasurer's regu- 
lations. 

Ordinarily the discipline at Spring Hill should furnish no serious 
difficulties to youths who come from Christian homes where filial 
obedience is practiced, and honor and self-restraint are held up as 
ideals of genuine character. 

Religious Life of Students 

The College is a Catholic institution intended primarily for Cath- 
olic students, but it does not exclude those of other religious beliefs 
who may wish to take advantage of its system of education. As a 
rule about 25 per cent of the whole student body, and about 5 per 
cent of the boarding students are non-Catholic. Special courses in 
religion are provided for the non-Catholics to replace the required 
courses in Catholic religion. They are permitted and encouraged to 
attend to their own religious obligations on Sunday. By exception they 
are expected and required to assist as part of the student body at the 
collegiate chapel services listed in the annual College Calendar. 

The Catholic students are given every opportunity to learn their 
religion in theory and in practice. A graded course in Religion is 
offered, running through four years, and all Catholics are obliged 
to register for these courses. Credits are given for the courses and 
required for graduation. 

Except on special occasions daily Mass is part of the order of the 
day for boarding students. Frequent, even daily Communion is en- 
couraged and quite generally practiced. Special devotions are prac- 
ticed towards the Sacred Heart on the first Friday of the month, 
and towards the Blessed Virgin Mary during the months of October 
and May. A wonderful occasion of grace for many is the annual three- 
day Retreat given in the second semester and obligatory on all Cath- 
olic students, boarders and day scholars alike. The day scholars will 
be charged a nominal fee for board and lodging during the three days 
of the exercises. 

One of the Fathers on the Faculty is appointed as counsellor or 
advisor of the students. His principal duty is to direct the spiritual 
activities of the college and the various religious societies and so- 
dalities, in regard to which he exercises much the same supervision as 
the Prefect of Discipline exercises- in his department. 

He is in a special sense the friend and advisor of the students, not 
only in matters directly spiritual but also material and temporal, in 
their studies, their social duties, and in other intimate and personal 
matters. One of the questions of highest importance to every college 
graduate is the wise choice of a profession or vocation, according to 
one's character, talents and attractions, both natural and supernatural. 
In this matter the assistance of the Student Counsellor will be in- 
valuable. His hours will be arranged so as to afford ample oppor- 
tunity of conferring with him. 

15 



Spring Hell College 

expenses 

General (per year) 

Tuition . $150.00 

Board 240.00 

Activities Fee: library, entertainment, athletic fee . . 50.00 

Medical Fee: (for resident students only) 20.00 

These expenses and fees are payable in advance in semi-annual 
installments. In the case of resident students, $230.00 payable on 
the opening of school in September, and $230.00 payable on 
February 1st. In the case of day students, $100.00 payable on 
the opening of school in September and $100.00 payable on Feb- 
ruary 1st. 

Note: Activities fee is payable by all students including those 
enjoying the benefits of a scholarship. The Medical Fee takes 
care of medical attention by the Staff Physician and ordinary 
nursing in the College Infirmary not in excess of ten days. 

A Matriculation Fee of $10.00 is payable on first entrance only. 

The above are fixed charges for every student. 

Room Rentals (per year) 

Quinlan Hall $100.00 

Mobile Hall 150.00 

This expense includes laundry and is payable one-half at the op- 
ening of school in September and one-half on February 1st. 
Rooms are shared by two occupants. Single occupancy entails 
an extra fee of $50.00 for the year. A deposit of $10.00 for room 
reservation must accompany each application for entrance. This 
deposit is not applied to room rent but is retained to cover any 
damage beyond reasonable wear which may be done to the room 
or its furnishings while occupied by the students. The balance 
is returned to the parents when the student withdraws from the 
College. This deposit is not returned in case of failure to occupy 
a room. Rooms are equipped with shower bath and toilet, and 
are supplied with hot and cold water and all necessary heavy 
furnishings. Students supply their own toilet linen, rugs and 
whatever decorations are appropriate. 

16 



Spring Hill College 

Other Fees (per year) 

Physics, Chemistry, Biology — Laboratory, each . . . . $15.00 

Breakage deposit (in each Science course — refundable) . . 5.00 

Accounting Laboratory 10.00 

Special Courses in Accountancy 2.00 

Stenography and Typewriting, each 20.00 

Surveying 5.00 

Drawing, if not in course 25.00 

Conditional Examination, on days assigned 1.00 

Conditional Examination, on other than assigned days . 2.00 

Special Examination 5.00 

Make-up Laboratory period, each 1.00 

Duplicate Transcript of Record 1.00 

Fee for Late Registration 5.00 

Golf Membership Fee 10.00 

Lunch for day students on class days 50.00 

Graduation Fee, final year only 15.00 

Treasurer s Regulations 

All bills are payable in advance at the beginning of each semester, 
namely, in September and February. All checks should be made pay- 
able to Spring Hill College and addressed directly to the Treasurer. 
Those desiring to send postal Money Orders should have them drawn 
on the Mobile Post Office. 

All minor expenses, for books, stationery, etc., are on a strictly 
cash basis. Money for the personal accounts should be sent directly 
to the student, who alone will be responsible to the parents or guard- 
ians, for an itemized statement of expenditures. This money may be 
deposited for safe keeping with the Treasurer, but in this case, par- 
ents must state in writing a definite amount to be given weekly to the 
student. No advance of money will ever be made at any time for any 
purpose whatever. In case of emergency, students should have money 
wired to them. 

If a student is withdrawn before the end of the semester, no de- 
ductions will be made. Should, however, a student leave on account 
of prolonged illness, or be dismissed honorably, a deduction for 
board and room rental, but not for tuition and fees, will be made for 

17 



Spring Hill College 

the remainder of the semester, beginning with the first of the follow- 
ing month. The date on which notice is received by the Treasurer is 
considered the date of withdrawal. 

No student may have an honorable dismissal nor will he be given 
credit for his studies or be admitted to the examination in January 
or May until all indebtedness to the College has been settled. 

The college will not be responsible for books, clothing, jewelry or 
any other articles possessed by the student while in school or left by 
him at his departure. 

Students* visitors who stay at the College will be charged for board 
and lodging at the rate of $2.00 per day. 

Plans of Payment 

Although the general regulation calls for payment in two semi- 
annual installments, the College offers two alternate plans of pay- 
ment: 

First Plan : As a special inducement to early registration and full pay- 
ment in advance and with a view to cooperating with parents who 
wish to effect a saving, reductions are available on tution, board and 
roam rental only, as follows : 

A discount of 6 per cent, where payment for the Year is made in 
full prior to July 1. 

A discount of 4 percent where payment for the Year is made in 
full prior to August 1. 

A discount of 2 per cent, where payment for the Year is made in 
full before the end of the first week of classes. 

Second Plan: Payments on tuition, board and room rental may be 
made in nine monthly installments, in advance, beginning with Sep- 
tember and ending in May. An extra charge of $3.00 in the case of 
resident students, and $1.00 in case of day students, will be added 
each month, should parents elect to pay on the monthly plan. 

Special arrangements for any other alternative plan of payments, 
or possible reduction in the case of brothers, must be made before the 
opening of classes, with the Treasurer. 

An interest charge of 5 per cent will be added to accounts past 
due. 

18 



Spring Hill College 



admission 



Subjects Accepted for Admission 

The subjects accepted for admission and their values in units are given below 
in tabulated form. Fuller definition of the units, or information concerning 
the acceptance of subjects not listed below, may be had by writing to the 
Registrar. 



Subjects 


Topics 


Units 


English A 
English B 
English C 
English D 


Advanced Grammar and Composition 
Composition and Rhetoric 
Critical Study of English Literature 
History of English or American Literature 




Mathematics Al 
Mathematics A2' 

Mathematics B 
Mathematics C 
Mathematics D 


Algebra to Quadratic Equations 
Quadratics, Progressions, and the Binomial 

Formula 
Plane Geometry 
Solid Geometry 
Arithmetic 


% to 1 

% 

% 


History A 
History B 
History C 
History D 


Greek and Roman History 

Medieval and Modern European History 

English History 

American History 




Latin A 
Latin B 
Latin C 
Latin D 


Grammar, Composition and Translations 
Caesar's Gallic War, I-II; Grammar, Comp. 
Cicero's Orations (5); Grammar; Composition 
Virgil's Aeneid, I-V; Grammar; Composition 




German A 
German B 


Elementary Grammar, Composition, Trans. 
Intermediate Grammar, Composition, Trans. 




French A 
French B 


Elementary Grammar, Composition, Trans. 
Intermediate Grammar, Composition, Trans. 




Spanish A 
Spanish B 


Elementary Grammar, Composition, Trans. 
Intermediate Grammar, Composition, Trans. 




Science A 
Science B 
Science C 
Science D 
Science E 
Science F 
Science G 


Physical Geography 

Chemistry 

Physics 

!°SS£, Bio.o g y 
Physiology 
General Science 


i 

% 

% tol 


Social Science A 
Social Science B 
Social Science C 


Civil Government 

Economics 

Sociology 


y 2 to i 


VOCATIONAL SUBJECTS (Not more than Three Units) 


Manual and Mil- 
itary Training 


Drawing 
Shop Work 
R.O.T.C. 
Physical Training 


V 2 to 2 
% to 2 
V 2 to 1 
% to 1 


Agriculture 


(Accredited Agricultural School Course) 


1 to 2 


Commercial 
Subjects 


Business English 
Commercial Geography 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Bookkeeping 
Cemmercial Arithmetic 


y 2 to i 

y 2 
y 2 to i 

y 2 
y 2 to i 
y 2 to i 


Home Econom- 
ics and Music 


Cooking 

Sewing 

Music 


1 to 2 
1 to 2 
1 to 2 



19 



Spring Hill College 
Credentials 

The college requires for admission the satisfactory completion of a 
four-year course in a secondary school approved by a recognized ac- 
crediting agency or the equivalent of such a course. All candidates 
for admission to Freshman year must present fifteen units in accept- 
able subjects. A unit represents a year's study in any subject, con- 
stituting approximately a quarter of a full year's work. This defi- 
nition of a unit takes the four-year high school as a basis and assumes 
that the length of the school year is from thirty-six to forty weeks, 
that a period is from forty-five to sixty minutes in length, and that 
the study is pursued for four or five periods a week. 

Required Subjects for Admission 

Of the 15 units presented for admission to Freshman class, not 
more than three may be commercial, industrial, or vocational subjects. 
Specified units for all students are: English, 3 ; History, 1; Language, 
2. Candidates for the A.B. degree must present at entrance (or secure 
during Freshman and Sophomore years, Latin, 4. Candidates for the 
B.S. degree must present Science, 1, and Mathematics, 3. Candidates 
for the B.S.C. must present Bookkeeping, 1. 

Methods of Admission 
Candidates are admitted either on certificate or by examination. 

Admission by Certificate 
Admission by certificate is granted applicants from all schools on 
the approved list of the Commission on Accredited Schools of the 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern States 
and of other recognized accrediting agencies outside the territory em- 
braced by the Southern Association. 

Blank forms of entrance certificates, which are to be used in every 
case, may be had on application to the Registrar. Certificates must be 
made out and signed by the Principal or other recognized officer of the 
school, and mailed by him directly to the Registrar. It is expected 
that the Principal will not recommend all graduates, but only those 
whose ability, application and scholarship are such that the school 
is willing to stand sponsor for their success in college. 

Admission by Examination 

Applicants who are not entitled to admission by certificate must 
take examinations in the required entrance units. These examinations 
are held during the week preceding the opening of classes. 

20 



Spring Hill College 
Admission to Advanced Standing 

Students applying for admission from standard institutions of col- 
legiate rank will be given advanced standing provided the credits of 
the institution are acceptable and sufficient to be considered equivalent 
to the work done in the corresponding classes at Spring Hill. 

Such candidates should present in advance of registration : 

1. A certificate of honorable dismissal from the school last at- 
tended. 

2. An official transcript of college credits, with specifications of 
courses, year when taken, hours and grades. 

Special Students 

Mature and earnest students, who either are lacking in the required 
units or wish to pursue particular studies without reference to gradua- 
tion, may be admitted by the permission of the Dean to such course 
of their own choice as they seem qualified to take. The work done by 
these students cannot be counted later on toward a degree at Spring 
Hill unless all entrance requirements have been satisfied. 

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES OF THE 
VARIOUS DEGREES 

The objective of the Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) degree or curriculum 
is to give a balanced cultural education as a foundation for full 
living. This objective is to be attained through the humanistic and 
philosophic disciplines, supplemented by training in scientific and 
mathematical thinking, the entire curriculum to be integrated by an 
acquaintance with the social and religious factors that have entered 
into the making of Western civilization, and that contribute to the 
solution of contemporary problems. 

The objective of the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree or curricu- 
lum is to give by means of the natural sciences, biology and mathe- 
matics, a thorough training in the scientific method as a basis of 
sound scientific thinking, balanced by cultural training in language, 
literature and history, and correlated as intimately as possible with 
scholastic philosophy. 

The objective of the Bachelor of Science in Commerce (B.S.C.) 
degree or curriculum is to give a systematic and balanced training 

21 



Spring Hill College 

in the problems and principles of business administration with 
specialization in one of three fields related to the world of commerce, 
supplemented by cultural work in language, history and scholastic 
philosophy. 

The objective of the Bachelor of Philosophy (Ph.B.) degree or 
curriculum is a systematic training in the social studies or in the 
modern literatures, with specialization in one or two fields, supple- 
mented by the scientific or mathematical disciplines, and intimately 
correlated with scholastic philosophy. 

Distinguishing Characteristic of Degrees 

The A.B. degree is conferred if the candidate has completed the 
full cycle of Scholastic Philosophy, and included in his course two 
years of college Latin. 

The Ph.B. degree is conferred if the candidate has completed the 
full cycle of Scholastic Philosophy, and a major or minor in Social 
Sciences, Modern Language or History. 

The B.S. degree is conferred on one who has concentrated his 
studies on Science or Mathematics. 

The B.S.C. degree is conferred on students who complete their 
program in the Department of Commerce. 



PROGRAMS OF CURRICULA 
A.B. 

Freshman 

First Semester: Sem. Second Semester: Sem. 

Hrs. Hrs. 

Latin _______3 Latin _______3 

Greek (or Mod. Lang.) _ _ 3 Greek (or Mod. Lang.) _ _ 3 

English ______ 3 English - 3 

Mathematics _____ 4 Mathematics _____ 4 

Science ______ 4 Science ______ 4 

Religion _-___- 1 Religion ______ 1 

Sophomore 

First Semester: Second semester: 

Latin _______3 Latin _______3 

Greek (or Mod. Lang.) _ _ 3 Greek (or Mod. Lang.) _ _ 3 

English Literature _ _ _ 3 English Literature _ _ _ 3 

Modern Language _ _ _ 3 Modern Language _ _ _ 3 

Logic _______2 Logic _-_____2 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 

Religion ______ 1 Religion ______ 1 

22 



Spring Hill College 

Junior 

First Semester: Sem. Second Semester: Sem. 

Hrs. Hrs. 

General Metaphysics _ _ 3 Psychology _____ 4 

History ______ 3 History ______ 3 

Religion _______ 1 Religion _______ 1 

Major or Minor Elect _ _ 9 Major or Minor Elect _ _ 9 

Senior 
First Semester: Second Semester: 

Ethics ________ Ethics _____--- 

Religion ______ 1 Religion ______ 1 

Special Metaphysics _ _ 3 History of Philosophy _ _ 2 

Major or Minor Elect. _ _ 6 Major or Minor Elect. _ _ 6 



Ph.B. 



Freshman 



First Semester: 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

Modern Language _ _ _ 3 
Chemistry (or Math.) _ _ 4 
English ______ 3 

History ______ 3 

Sociology (or Polit. Sci.) _ 3 
Religion _______ 



Second Semester: 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

Modern Language _ _ _ 3 
Chemistry (or Math.) _ _ 4 
English ______ 3 

History ______ 3 

Sociology (or Polit. Sci.) _ 3 
Religion _______ 



Sophomore 



First Semester: 

Modern Language _ _ _ 3 

English ______ 3 

Logic _______2 

Economics _____ 3 

Polit. Sci. (or Sociol.) _ _ 3 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 



Religion 



Second Semester: 

Modern Language _ _ _ 3 

English ______ 3 

Logic _______2 

Economics _____ 3 

Polit. Sci. (or Sociol.) _ _ 3 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 



Religion 



Junior 



First Semester: 

Philosophy _____ 3 

Religion ______ 1 

Electives ______ 12 



Second Semester: 

Philosophy _____ 3 

Religion ______ 1 

Electives ______ 12 



First Semester: 
Ethics _ _ _ _ _ 
Special Metaphysics 
Religion _ _ _ _ 
Electives __ _ _ 



Senior 

Second Semester: 
4 Ethics _______4 

3 Hist. Phil. ______ 2 

1 Religion ______ 1 

6 Electives ______ 7 



23 



Spring Hill College 



Z?.<S. (with major in Biology) 



First Semester: 



Sem. 

Hrs. 
General Biology _ _ . _ 4 
Chemistry _____ 4 

French (or German) _ _ 3 
English ______ 3 

Mathematics _____ 4 

Religion ______! 



Freshman 

Second Semester: 



Sem. 

Hrs. 
General Biology _ _ _ - 4 
Chemistry _____ 4 

French (or German) _ _ 3 
English ______ 3 

Mathematics _____ 4 

Religion ______! 



Sophomore 



First semester: 
Comp. Anatomy _ _ _ _ 4 

Gen. Physics _____ 4 

Qualitative Chem. _ _ _ 4 
French (or German) _ _ 3 
Logic _______2 

Religion ______! 



Second Semester: 
Genetics ______ 2 

Gen. Physics _____ 4 

Quantitative Chem. _ _ _ 4 
French (or German) _ _ 3 
Logic ___-___2 
Religion ______! 



Junior 



First Semester: 



Histology ______ 4 

Organic Chemistry _ _ _ 4 
Philosophy _____ 3 

English ______ 3 

History ______ 3 

Religion ______! 



Second Semester: 
Vertebrate Embryology 

Organic Chemistry _ _ 

Psychology _ _ _ _ 

English _ _ _ _ _ 

History _ _ _ _ _ 

Religion _ _ _ _ _ 



Senior 



First Semester: 
Introd. Gen. Physiol. _ _ 4 
Physiolog. Chemistry _ _ 3 
Physical Chemistry _ _ _ 3 
Ethics _______4 

Religion ______! 



Second Semester: 
General Physiology _ _ 
Microscopic Technique 
Physical Chemistry _ _ 
Ethics ______ 

Religion _ _ _ _ _ 



B.S. (with major in Chemistry) 



First Semester: 



Sem. 
Hrs. 
English ______ 3 

Maths. ______ 4 

Mod. Lang. _____ 3 

_ _ 4 
_ _ 1 



Freshman 

Second Semester: 



Gen. Inorg. Chem. _ _ 
Public Speaking _ . _ _ 
Drawing ______ 2 

Religion ______! 



Sem. 

Hrs. 
English ______ 3 

Maths. ______ 4 

Mod. Lang. _____ 3 

Gen. Inorg. Chem. _ _ _ 4 
Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 1 

Drawing ______ 2 

Religion ______! 



24 



Spring Hill College 



First Semester: 



Physics _ _ - 
Qualit. Analysis - 
Mod. Lang. _ _ 
Logic _ _ _ _ 



Sophomore 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

_ 4 

- 4 

. 3 

. 2 



History 3 

Religion ______! 



Second Semester: 



Sem. 
Hrs. 



Physics ______ 4 

Quant. Analysis _ _ _ _ 5 

Mod. Lang. _____ 3 

Logic ____---2 

History ______ 3 

Religion ______ 1 



First Semester: 
Gen. Metaphysics 
English _ _ _ 
Religion _ _ _ 
Organic Chemistry 
Maths, or Biology 



Junior 

Second Semester: 

3 Psychology _____ 4 

3 English ______ 3 

1 Religion ______ 1 

4 Organic Chemistry _ _ _ 4 
4 Maths, or Biology _ _ _ 4 



Senior 

First Semester: 

Ethics _______ 4 

Religion ______ 1 

Physical Chem. _ _ _ _ 3 

Quantit. Analysis (4) or 

Physiological Chem. _ _ 3 

Elective ______ 3 



Second semester: 

Ethics ------- 4 

Religion ______ 1 

Physical Chem. _ _ _ _ 3 

Quantit. Analysis (4) or 

Physiological Chem. _ _ 3 

Elective ______ 3 



i5.5. (with major in Mathematics) 



First Semester: 

Chemistry _ - _ 
English _ _ _ _ 
Mathematical Analysis 
Mechanical Drawing 
Modern Language _ 
Public Speaking _ _ 
Religion _ - - - 



Freshman 

Second Semester: 



Sem. 
Hrs. 
. 4 
_ 3 
_ 4 
_ 1 
_ 3 
_ 1 
- 1 



Sem. 

Hrs. 
Chemistry _ - _ _ _ 4 
English _-_-__ 3 
Mathematical Analysis _ _ 4 
Mechanical Drawing _ _ 1 
Modern Language _ _ _ 3 
Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 1 
Religion ______! 



First Semester: 
Differential Calculus 
English Literature _ 
General Physics _ _ 
Logic _____ 
Modern Language _ 
Religion _ _ _ _ 



Sophomore 

Second Semester: 

4 Integral Calculus 

. 3 English Literature 

4 General Physics _ 

2 Logic _ _ _ _ 

3 Modern Language 
1 Religion _ _ _ 



25 



Spring Hill College 



Junior 



First Semester: 



Sem. 

Hrs. 
Analytic Geometry _ _ _ 3 
Differential Equations _ _ 3 
General Metaphysics _ _ 3 
History ______ 3 

Religion ______ 1 

Elective _ _ _ _ _ _ 3 



Second Semester: 

Advanced Calculus - 
Psychology _ _ _ 
History _ _ _ _ 
Religion _ _ _ _ 
Elective _ _ _ _ 



Senior 



First Semester: 
Analytical Mechanics _ 
Higher Algebra, _ _ _ 
Ethics ______ 

Religion _ _ - - _ 



3 
3 
4 
1 
Elective ______ 5 



Sem. 
Hrs. 
_ 4 
_ 4 
_ 3 
_ 1 
_ 4 



Second Semester: 
Analytical Mechanics _ _ 
Theory of Equations _ _ 
Ethics _______ 

Religion 



Elective ______ 5 



i5.5. (with major in Pnysics) 



Freshman 



First Semester: 



Sem. 

Hrs. 
Chemistry _____ 4 

English _______ 3 

Mathematical Analysis _ _ 4 
Mechanical Drawing _ _ 1 
Modern Language _ _ _ 3 
Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 1 

Religion _______ 



Second semester: Sem. 

Hrs. 
Chemistry _____ 4 

English _______ 3 

Mathematical Analysis _ _ 4 
Mechanical Drawing _ _ 1 
Modern Language _ _ _ 3 
Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 1 

Religion _______ 



First Semester: 
Differential Calculus _ 
English Literature _ _ 
Logic ______ 

Modern Language _ _ 
General Physics _ _ _ 
Religion _____ 



First Semester: 
Atomic Physics _ _ 
Differential Equations 
Electricity _ _ _ 
General Metaphysics 
History _ _ _ _ 
Religion _ _ _ _ 



Sophomore 

Second Semester: 
4 Integral Calculus 

3 English Literature 

2 Logic _ _ _ _ 

3 Modern Language 

4 General Physics _ 
1 Religion _ _ _ 

Junior 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 

Senior 



Second Semester: 
Atomic Physics _ _ _ 
Advanced Calculus _ _ 
Electricity _ _ _ _ 
Psychology _ _ _ _ 
History _____ 
Religion _____ 



First Semester: 
Analytical Mechanics _ _ 3 
Ethics __-____4 

Physical Optics _ _ _ _ 3 

Religion ______ 1 

Elective ______ 5 



Second Semester: 
Analytical Mechanics _ _ 3 
Ethics _______4 

Thermodynamics _ _ _ 3 
Religion ______ 1 

Elective ______ 5 



26 



Spring Hill College 

B.S.C. 



Freshman 



First Semester: 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

Accounting _____ 3 

Economics _ _ _ - - 3 

English _____ _ 3 

Business Mathematics _ _ 3 

Modern Language _ _ _ 3 

Religion ______ 1 



Second semester: 



Sem. 

Hrs. 



Accounting _____ 3 

Economics _____ 3 

English ______ 3 

Business Mathematics _ _ 3 

Modern Language _ _ _ 3 

Religion ______ 1 



First Semester: 

Accounting _____ 3 

Economics _____ 3 

English ______ 3 

Business Admin._ _ _ _ 3 

Logic _--__-_2 
Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 1 

Religion _______ 



Sophomore 

Second Semester: 
Accounting _____ 3 



Economics _____ 3 

English ______ 3 

Business Admin._ _ _ _ 3 

Logic __--_--2 
Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 1 

Religion ______! 



Junior 



First Semester: 
General Metaphysics 
Business Admin._ _ 
Religion _ _ _ _ 
Major and Minor Elec. 



First Semester: 



Second Semester: 

3 Psychology _____ 4 

3 Business Admin. _ _ _ _ 3 

1 Religion ______ 1 

9 Major and Minor Elec. _ _ 8 



Senior 



Ethics _ _ _ 
Religion _ - 
Major and Min. 



Elec. 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

_ 4 
_ 1 
_ 12 



Second Semester: 



Sem. 
Hrs. 



Ethics ______ 

Religion _____ 

Major and Min. Elec. _ 



4 

1 

10 



Special Pre-Professional Courses 

The best preparation for any profession is a complete four years' 
college course. 

Where students for financial or other reasons are unable to take 
the full college course, their studies may be selected so as to consti- 
tute a minimum preparation for their professional course. As a con- 
cession to such cases, Spring Hill, though primarily a Liberal Arts 
College, offers the following programs of study. 



27 



28 



Engineering Course 



Freshman 

First Semester: Sem. Second Semester: Sem. 

Hrs. Hrs. 

Chemistry _____ 4 Chemistry _____ 4 

English ______ 3 English ______ 3 

Mathematical Analysis. _ 4 Mathematical Analysis. _ 4 

General Physics _ _ _ _ 4 General Physics _ _ _ _ 4 

Mechanical Drawing _ _ 2 Mechanical Drawing _ _ 2 

Religion ______ 1 Religion ______ 1 

Sophomore 

First Semester: Second Semester: 

Differential Calculus _ _ 4 Integral Calculus _ _ _ 4 

English ______ 3 English ______ 3 

Drawing or Descript. Geo _ 3 Drawing or Descript. Geo _ 3 

Religion ______ 1 Religion ______ 1 

♦Electives (science) _ _ _ 6 Electives ______ 6 

Pre-Legal Course 

Note: Most law schools admit all applicants who have successfully 
completed two years of a regular college course for a minimum of 60 
credit hours. A few with higher standards, among them Georgetown 
University, require an A.B. degree. 

The following is only one possible two-year program for future law 
students. 

Freshman 



First Semester: Sem. 

Hrs. 
History ______ 3 

Political Science. _ _ _ 3 
Language ______ 3 

Science (or math) _ _ _ 4 
English ______ 3 

Religion ______ 1 



Second Semester: 



History _ _ _ _ 

Political Science. _ 
Language _ _ _ _ 

Science (or math) _ 
English ______ 3 

Religion _______ 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

_ 3 

_ 3 

_ 3 

_ 4 



Sophomore 



First Semester: 
History ______ 3 

Language ______ 3 

Logic _______2 

Sociology ______ 3 

English ______ 3 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 

Religion _______ 



Second Semester: 
History ______ 3 

Language ______ 3 

Logic _____-_2 

Sociology ______ 3 

English ______ 3 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 

Religion ______! 



*These electives should consist of additional courses in physics, mathe- 
matics, chemistry, or other special subjects as required by different 
engineering schools in the particular branches of engineering. 



28 



Spring Hill College 
Pre-Dental Course 



First Semester: 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

General Biology _ _ _ _ 4 

Inorganic Chemistry _ _ 4 

English ______ 3 

Modern Language _ _ _ 3 

♦Physics ______ 4 

Religion ______ 1 



Freshman 

Second Semester: 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

General Biology _ _ _ _ 4 

Inorganic Chemistry _ _ 4 
English ______ 3 

Modern Language _ _ _ 3 
♦Physics ______ 4 

Religion _______ 



Sophomore 



First Semester: 

Comparative Anatomy - - 4 

Organic Chemistry _ _ _ 4 

English ______ 3 

Modern Language _ _ _ 3 

Physics ------ 4 

Religion ______ 1 



Second semester: 

Quantitative Chemistry _ 4 

Organic Chemistry _ _ _ 4 

English ______ 3 

Modern Language _ _ - 3 

Physics _-__-- 4 
Religion _______ 



Pre-Medica1 C 



ourse 



The minimum requirement for admission to recognized medical 
schools, in addition to the high school requirement, is sixty semester 
hours of collegiate work extending through two years of at least 
thirty-two weeks each, in a college approved by the Council of Medi- 
cal Education of the American Medical Association. 

The subjects prescribed for the minimum of two years of college 
work are as follows : 

Chemistry _______ 12 

Physics ________8 

Biology ________8 

English composition and lit. _ _ 6 
Other non-science subjects _ _ 12 
French or German _ _ _ _ 8-12 



♦Dental Schools accept High School Physics for credit but College 
Physics is highly recommended. If two years of Pre-Dental work be 
taken, Physics should be taken in the second year. If Physics is not 
taken, some mathematics or history should be substituted for it. 



29 



Spring Hill College 

Subjects strongly urged: 

Advanced botany or compara- 
tive anatomy _____ 3-6 

Psychology ______ 3-6 

Algebra and trigonometry _ _ 3-6 
Additional courses in chemistry 3-6 

Other suggested electives: 

English (additional), economics, 
history, sociology, political science, 
logic, Latin, Greek, drawing. 

The above represents the minimum requirements. Many medical 
schools have raised their standards and demand a three-year course 
of college preparation. It is to serve these that the Spring Hill pre- 
medical program is designed. The ideal preparation for the future 
doctor is the four year course leading to a B.S., or preferably an A.B. 
degree. The student in this case, however, should make sure to include 
in his elective studies the courses listed above. 

Three Year Program 
First Year 



First Semester: 

General Biology _ _ . 

Inorganic Chemistry . 

French (or German) . 

English _ _ _ _ . 
Mathematical Analysis. 

Religion _ _ _ _ . 



Sem. 
Hrs. 
_ 3 
_ 4 
_ 3 
_ 3 
_ 4 
_ 1 



Second Semester: Sem. 

Hrs. 

General Biology _ _ _ _ 3 

Inorganic Chemistry _ _ 4 
French (or German) _ _ 3 
English ______ 3 

Mathematical Analysis. _ 4 
Religion _______ 



First Semester: 

Comparative Anatomy 
Qualitative Chemistry 
General Physics _ _ 
French (or German) 
Logic _____ 
Public Speaking _ _ 
Religion _ _ _ _ 



Second Year 

Second Semester: 

_ 4 Genetics ______ 2 

_ 4 Quantitative Chemistry _ 4 

_ 4 General Physics _ _ - _ 4 

_ 3 French (or German) _ _ 3 

_ 2 Logic _______2 

_ 1 Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 1 

_ 1 Religion _______ 



Third Year 



First Semester: 

Histology _ _ _ _ 
Organic Chemistry _ 
General Metaphysics 
History _ _ _ _ 
English _ _ _ _ 
Religion _ _ _ _ 



_ 4 

_ 4 

_ 3 

_ 3 

_ 3 

_ 1 



Second Semester: 

Vertebrate Embryology _ 4 

Organic Chemistry _ _ _ 4 

Psychology _____ 4 

History ______ 3 

English ______ 3 

Religion _______ 



30 



Spring Hill College 
Teacher Training 

Teachers' certificates which entitle the holder to teach in the schools 
of Alabama are issued by the State Department of Education to 
students of Spring Hill College who comply with the requirements 
set forth in the State bulletin. These requirements in the field of sec- 
ondary education may be fulfilled while the students are doing their 
work for college degrees. The types of certificates and the prescribed 
programs are given herewith. 

Secondary Professional Class C Certificates 

A Secondary Professional Class C Certificate may be issued to a 
person who started an approved teacher-training curriculum in Sep- 
tember 1930, or thereafter, who presents credentials showing: 

1. That he has completed a minimum of three years work in a 
standard institution, and ranks as a senior in a curriculum approved 
for the training of secondary teachers. 

2. That he has earned the following prescribed credits: 

Sem. 
Hrs. 

a) English ____________ 12 

b) History ____________6 

3) Political Science or, Sociology, or Economics - 6 

d) Science (Biology recommended) _____ 6 

e) General Psychology _________3 

f) Education 

1. Educational Psychology ______ 3 

2. Principles of High School Teaching _ _ _ 3 

3. Electives in Secondary Education _ _ _ 6 
(Excess credits in required courses in Educa- 
tion will not be accepted in meeting any part 
of this requirement.) 

3. That he has to his credit an academic major of 18 semester hours 
in an approved subject. 

4. That he has to his credit an academic minor of 12 semester hours 
in an approved subject. 

Secondary Professional Class B Certificate 

To the requirement for the Class C certificate must be added: 

1. A bachelor's degree from a standard institution in a. curriculum 
approved for the training of secondary teachers (Spring Hill is such 
an institution). 

2. The following Education credits: 

Materials and Methods of teaching: Major, 3 sem. hrs; Minor, 3 

sem. hrs. 

Practice Teaching in Major or Minor: 3 sem. hrs. 

3. The academic major in approved subject must be 24 hours. 

4. The academic minor in approved subject must be 18 hours. 

31 



Spring Hill College 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

General Requirements 

The conditions for the Baccalaureate degrees are the following: 

1. The satisfactory completion of the four years' course leading to 
the degree for which the student is a candidate. 

2. A written thesis approved by the Dean of the College and pre- 
sented on or before April 1st of the year in which the degree is to be 
conferred. 

3. In order to be accepted in fulfillment of any requirement for the 
degree, all work must be completed with a grade of D (70-75) or over, 
and the general average of the work must be of grade C (75-84) or 
above. 

4. At the end of his Senior year the student must pass a compre- 
hensive examination on the various courses offered as major and first 
minor. This requirement will be enforced for all students who register 
in or after September, 1933. 

5. The Senior year (or 24 of the last 30 credit hours) must be 
made at Spring Hill College. 

6. A graduation fee of fifteen dollars, payable in advance, and the 
settlement of all indebtedness to the College. 

All applicants for a degree must file their applications and present 
all their credits and the evidence of having met all requirements listed 
above, on or before the first of April. 

Quality Points 

A candidate for a degree must gain not only the number of credits 
required, but his work must reach a certain standard of excellence. In 
addition to the 128 hours credit necessary for graduation, each student 
must earn at least 128 quality points, or an average mark in all sub- 
jects of C or better. 

No student will be advanced to candidacy for any collegiate degree 
whose credit points do not equal his semester hours at the beginning 
of his last semester. 

For a grade of A (92-100) in a given course, a student will receive 
three times as many quality points as there are hour credits in that 
course; for a grade of B (85-91), twice as many quality points; for 
a grade of C (75-84), as many quality points as credit hours. For 
example: a three-hour course in which the student receives A gives 
9 quality points; B, 6 quality points; and C, merely three quality 
points. 

32 



Spring Hill College 
Major and Minor Sequence 

There must be completed a Major Sequence of at least twenty-four 
hours in some subject (or at the discretion of the professor concerned 
and with the approval of the Dean, in some closely related group of 
subjects) and a Minor Sequence of at least eighteen hours. 

A major may be changed only by the consent of the Dean and the 
heads of the departments concerned, and such change will be per- 
mitted only upon the distinct understanding that all the courses pre- 
scribed in the major finally chosen shall be completed before gradua- 
tion. 

Electives 

Courses (a) not taken as prescribed courses, and (b) not included 
in the student's major and minor, may be chosen as approved electives 
to complete the 128 credits required for graduation. 

The two years of Modern Languages required for degrees must be 
of strictly college level. Hence students who are required to take an 
elementary language course, either for lack of two high school units 
in the modern language selected or because of inability to follow the 
intermediate language course, will receive no college credit for such 
elementary courses. 

In the choice of electives, each student must be guided by his pro- 
spective future work. He must ascertain, moreover, that such courses 
are open to his class; that he has fulfilled the prerequisites, and that 
there will be no conflict in the schedule of recitations or laboratory 
periods. 

Graduation Honors 

Honors at graduation are granted on the basis of quality points in 
their ratio to the total number of credit hours carried. Thus, for ex- 
ample, a student who consistently made A (92-100) in all his subjects 
of a 128-hour program would have 384 quality points, for a quality 
quotient of 3. The honors to be inscribed on the diplomas, read at 
commencement, and published in the lists of graduates are awarded 
on the following scale : 

Maxima cum laude for a quality quotient of 2.8; 

Magna cum laude for a quality quotient of 2.5; 

Cum laude for a quality quotient of 2. 

33 



Spring Hill College 
Required Subjects 



Prescribed for the A. B. Degree: 

Sem. 

Hrs. 

Latin _______ 12 

Greek (Mod. Lang.) _ _ 12 
English ______ 12 

Science ______ 8 

Mathematics _ _ _ _ _ 6 

History ______ 6 

Religion ______ 8 

Prescribed for the Ph.B. Degree: 

Modern Language _ _ _ 12 
English ______ 12 

Science (or Math) _ _ _ 8 
History ______ 6 

Political Science _ _ _ 6 
Economics _____ 6 

Religion ______ 8 

Prescribed for the B.S. Degree: 

Chemistry _____ 8 

Physics ______ 8 

Mathematics _ _ _ _ 8-16 

English ______ 12 

Modern Language _ _ _ 12 
History ______ 6 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

Logic _____-_- 

Metaphysics _____ 6 

Psychology _____ 4 

Ethics _______8 

Hist. Phil. _____ 2 

Sociology ______ 6 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 

Logic _-_-_--- 
Metaphysics _____ 6 

Psychology _____ 4 

Ethics ____-__8 

His. Phil. ______ 2 

Sociology ______ 6 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 

Logic __-----_ 

Metaphysics _____ 3 

Ethics _______ 8 

Psychology _____ 3 

Religion ______ 8 



Requirements for the B.S.C. Degree 



GROUP I (Accounting) 
Title 

Principles of Accounting 
Intermediate Accounting 
Advanced Accounting _ 
Analysis of Financial 

Statements _ _ _ 
Cost Accounting _ _ _ 
Federal Tax Accounting 
Auditing and C.P.A. 

Problems _ _ _ - 



Hrs. 
_ 6 
_ 6 
_ 6 

_ 3 
_ 3 
_ 3 



GROUP II (Business Admin.) 

Title 

Hrs. 

Principles of Business _ _ 3 

Business Law _ _ _ _ 6 

Corporation Finance _ _ 6 

Money and Banking _ _ 3 

Business and Office Admin. 3 

Insurance _____ 3 

Real Estate _____ 3 

Investments _____ 3 



34 



Spring Hill College 

GROUP III (Economics) 

Title 

Hrs. 

Economic Geography _________3 

Economic History of the U. S. ------ 3 

Principles of Economics ________6 

Public Finance ____-_-____3 

Transportation Principles ______--3 

Foreign Trade _-.______-.__3 

Elements of Statistics ________-3 

Advertising and Salesmanship ______ 3 

Principles of Marketing ________3 

There must be completed a Major Sequence of at least 24 hours in 
one of the above groups; a Minor Sequence of at least 18 hours in one 
of the remaining two groups, and 12 hours in the remaining group. 

The Unrelated Minor of 18 hours must be completed in Philosophy. 

The Prescribed Courses and Electives are: 

PRESCRIBED Hrs. ELECTIVES Hrs. 

Business Mathematics _ _ 6 Department of Commerce _ 6 

English ______ 12 Other Departments _ _ _ 10 

History ______ 6 

Language (above element'y) 6 
Public Speaking _ . _ _ 2 
Religion ______ 8 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



Oessions 

The school year begins in the second week of September and ends 
in the beginning of June. The year is divided into two semesters or 
sessions of eighteen weeks each. The first semester ends during the 
last week of January. The second begins immediately thereafter, with- 
out mid-year holidays. 

Attendance 

Since the purpose of college education is not only to impart infor- 
mation and develop the mental faculties, but also, if not chiefly, to 
train the student in habits of punctuality and fidelity to duty, prompt 
attendance at all class meetings is constantly stressed, and the co- 
operation of parents and guardians in this important matter is earn- 
estly requested. The date of registration and the limits of the various 
holiday periods are clearly stated in this catalogue, and will be strict- 
ly adhered to. 

While it is left to the discretion of the Dean to grant excuse for 
class absence in the case of sickness or similarly grave cause, the re- 

35 



Spring Hill College 

sponsibility for absence ordinarily rests with the student. It is to his 
interest to see that unauthorized absence from any course does not ex- 
ceed twice the number of semester hour credits allowed for that 
course. The penalty for such excessive absence is that the student's 
registration in such courses will be automatically canceled, and ac- 
cordingly no credit given for the course. In special cases, the delin- 
quent may be reinstated by the Committee on Registration and De- 
grees, upon written recommendation of his Instructor. 

Tardiness in class attendance is regarded as a partial absence. 
Three tardy marks will constitute one cut. Tardiness of more than 
fifteen minutes is considered absence. No absences from laboratory 
are excused. Work missed must be made up at the hours assigned by 
the instructor, and with a charge of $1 per period. 

Amount of Work 

The semester hour is the unit or standard for computing the amount 
of student's work. A semester hour is defined as one lecture, recitation 
or class exercise, one hour in length per week, for one semester. Two 
hours of laboratory work are equivalent to one recitation hour. Two 
hours of preparation on the part of the student is supposed for each 
lecture or recitation. 

A normal student load is from sixteen to eighteen hours per week. 
No candidate for a degree will be allowed to register for fewer than 
twelve or more than nineteen. 

Reference Study 

1. Students taking courses in Philosophy shall prepare and submit 
a term paper of 2,000 words dealing with the development of some 
specific topic of the subject-matter treated in class. 

2. Students taking courses in Education, History and Social 
Sciences will be required to hand in two papers each semester. These 
papers are to contain not less than 1000 words, and are to be based 
on the student's outside reading. 

3. All such and other prescribed written assignments will be held 
as prerequisites for graduation, for the fulfillment of which no student 
will be allowed any extension of time beyond April 1st of his Senior 
year. 

Examinations 

Examinations in all subjects are held at the end of each semester. 
Besides, there are intra-semestral tests. The semester examination, 
together with the average of the months preceding, determine the 
standing of a pupil for the semester. If a pupil, on account of sickness 

36 



Spring Hill College 

or any other cause, misses a written test or an examination in any 
subject, he will be required to make it up. In such cases, however, the 
responsibility rests with the student, and his record will show zero 
until such test or examination is taken. 

Seventy per cent is required for passing in each subject. Conditions 
may be incurred by failure to satisfy the requirements of any course, 
which requirements include the recitations, tests, and other assigned 
work, as well as the examinations. A condition due, either to failure 
in a monthly test or in a semester examination, may be removed by a 
supplementary test or examination. The supplementary tests may be 
taken at the convenience of the professor. The supplementary ex- 
aminations are held, upon recommendation of the department con- 
cerned and with the approval of the Dean of the college, during the 
first month of the succeeding semester. They may be taken only on 
the days specified, and may not be deferred, except with the express 
consent of the Dean. For each subject a fee is charged, payable in 
advance to the Treasurer of the college. Removal of conditions by 
examination shall not entitle the student to a grade higher than 
seventy per cent. 

A condition due to failure to complete assigned work may be 
removed by making up the required work. This ordinarily entails a 
fine of one dollar. 

Poor Scholarship — Dismissal 

Failure or unremoved condition in fifty per cent, of his work in any 
semester renders a student liable to dismissal for poor scholarship. 
Exception to this rule is made only for weighty reasons. 

Low grades and neglect of work within the semester render a stu- 
dent liable to probation, including exclusion from extra-curricular ac- 
tivities; and failure to improve will entail reduction of schedule with 
a permanent record of failure in the subject canceled. 

A test in proficiency in English will be given all Juniors. Should 
any prove unsatisfactory, they will be required to take a course in 
remedial English. Passing this course by the beginning of their last 
semester is a condition of graduation. 

Promotion 

Those students are ranked as Sophomores who have at least twenty- 
four credit hours and points and have completed the prescribed courses 
of Freshman year; Juniors those who have fifty-six credits and points 
and have completed the prescribed courses of the Sophomore year; 
Seniors, those who have ninety-two credit hours and points and have 
completed the prescribed courses of the Junior year. 

Reports 

At least four times a year, i.e., in November, February, April and 
June detailed reports of scholarship and conduct are issued from the 

37 



Spring Hill College 

Dean's office. At other times also similar reports will be furnished 
to interested parents or guardians upon request. 

Transcript of Record 

Students wishing transcript of records in order to transfer from 
this College to another, or for any other purpose, should make early 
and seasonable application for the same. No statements will be made 
out during the busy periods of examination and registration. The 
first transcript of record is furnished free. For each additional copy 
there is a charge of one dollar. 

PART TIME COURSES 

For the convenience of teachers and others who have satisfied the 
requirements of college entrance, the College offers special courses 
in college subjects leading to the various bachelor degrees. Students 
who have not satisfied the requirements for college entrance may 
enroll in these courses for the cultural value and general information 
to be gained thereby, but credit will not be granted until the proper 
entrance credentials have been approved and filed. 

This part-time work is offered in Summer Session, in a Saturday 
morning course, and in a Night Course. 

The Summer Session runs for six weeks for a maximum of eight 
semester hours. The bulletin of this session is published in April. 

Saturday Courses 

On Saturdays from 8:30 to 12:30 courses are given on the college 
campus during a full year of thirty-four weeks. The length of the 
periods is so arranged that students may gain three semester hours 
credit in a subject by taking it through the year, or by taking a double 
period through the semester. The maximum number of credits is nine 
for the year's work. 

The Saturday Classes for 1936 begin on September 19th and close 
on May 22nd. 

The tuition fee is the standard Alabama rate of $4 per semester 
hour. 

Night Courses 

Night classes are held three nights a week, Monday, Tuesday, and 
Thursday from 7:30 to 9:20 in Mobile, at the St. Joseph Parochial 
School, St. Louis Street and Jefferson Street. A student with the ap- 
proval of the Dean may carry two subjects for a total of six semester 
hours credit for each semester. 

The first semester of the Night Courses begins on September 21st 
and will run for seventeen weeks. The second semester begins on Janu- 
ary 25th, and the Night Course will end on May 27th. 

The tuition fee for the Night Course is to be calculated on the same 
rate as the Saturday Course, $4 per semester hour credit. 

38 



Spring Hill College 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

For convenience of reference the courses offered in the various de- 
partments are listed alphabetically according to subjects. For ad- 
ministrative purposes all departments are under the control of the 
Dean of the College, assisted by the advice of the faculty assembly, 
and for particular subjects by divisional grouping of the staff: Phil- 
osophy and Religion; Sciences; Language and Literature; Social 
Studies; and Commerce. 

Cycle Courses 

Some courses, especially among those numbered 300 or higher are 
not given every year, but only in alternative years. The Faculty, 
moreover, reserves the right to withdraw any course for which there 
is not a sufficient number of applicants. 

Numbering of Courses 

Courses numbered less than 100 are preparatory courses designed 
to supply for high school deficiencies. They carry no college credit. 

Courses numbered 100-200 are ordinarily reserved to Freshmen 
and Sophomores. 

Courses numbered 200-300 are primarily intended for Sophomores; 
occasionally well-qualified Freshmen will be permitted to enroll for 
them. 

Courses numbered 300-400 are for Juniors, though Seniors may 
schedule them for full credit. 

Courses 400-500 are strictly upper division courses, and primarily 
for Seniors. 

The last number indicates the semester in which the course is given, 
the odd numbers being for first semester courses, the even for second 
semester courses. 

Art 

101. HISTORY OF ART 

Ancient and Medieval Periods. A survey of the origin and develop- 
ment of the plastic and graphic arts up to the Renaissance. 

Two hours credit. 

102. history of art 

Renaissance and Post-Renaissance Art, with particular attention to 
the schools of painting. 

Two hours credit. 

39 



Spring Hill College 
Biology 

101-102. GENERAL BIOLOGY 

An introductory course consisting of an outline of the physical struc- 
ture and chemical composition of protoplasm and the cell, the mor- 
phology and physiology of plant and invertebrate animal types. 

Lectures two hours per week: laboratory four hours per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

103. GENETICS 

A survey course of the facts and theories of heredity and variation. 
Prerequisite: Biology 101 or equivalent. 

Lectures two hours per week. 

One semester. Two hours credit. 

104-5. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

A course intended primarily for nurses. It consists of lectures and 
demonstrations in gross human anatomy and physiology and of lec- 
tures and laboratory work in histology and embryology. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory two hours per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

106. LABORATORY TECHNIQUE 

A course designed for laboratory workers in hospitals and phy- 
sicians' offices. It includes lectures and laboratory work in clinical 
pathology, hematology, serology and blood chemistry. No college 
credit will be given for the work but a certificate will be granted 
on the satisfactory completion of the course. 
Time to be arranged. 

201. COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF THE VERTEBRATES 

A comparative study of type forms with special reference to analogy 
and homology. Prerequisite: Biology 101-102. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory six hours per week. 

Given every year. 

One semester Four hours credit. 

301. VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY 

A study of gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and 
later development of typical vertebrate forms. Prerequisites: Bi- 
ology 101-102 and 201. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

Given in 1935; to be given in 1937. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

302. HISTOLOGY 

A study of cells, tissues and organ structure. Prerequisites: Biology 
101-102, 201 and 301. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

Given in 1936; to be given in 1938. 

303. MICROSCOPIC TECHNIQUE 

A laboratory course in methods of preparing tissues for microscopic 
study. Prerequisites: Biology 101-102, 201, 301 and Chemistry 301. 
Time to be arranged. Two hours credit. 

40 



Spring Hill College 

401. introduction to general physiology 

A study of matter and energy in relation to living things; solutions; 
diffusion and osmotic pressure; the physico-chemical structure of 
protoplasm. Prerequisites: Biology 101-102, 201, 301 and Chemistry 
101-102, 301-302. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 
One semester. Four hours credit. 

402. GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY 

The fundamental life processes of organisms from a general and 
comparative viewpoint. Prerequisites: Biology 401 and Chemistry 
301-302, 401-402, 405-406. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

To be given in 1937. 

403. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH 

Special work for advanced students and preparation of thesis. 

Credit to be arranged. 



Chemistry 



101-102. GENERAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

A course dealing with the fundamental laws and theories of Chem- 
istry together with the systematic study of the elements. The labora- 
tory experiments are designed to illustrate the matter of the course. 

Obligatory for all Freshmen B.S. 

Lectures 2 hours per week; laboratory 4 hours per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

201. ELEMENTARY QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 

This course involves the theoretical and practical study of the prin- 
ciples underlying the isolation of the metallic and acid-forming ele- 
ments. 

Obligatory for all Pre-Med. students and for all those majoring in 
Chemistry. 

Lectures 2 hours per week; laboratory 4 hours per week. 

Two semesters. Four hours credit. 

202. ELEMENTARY QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 

This course includes and emphasizes the elements of volumetric 
and gravimetric methods of analysis. 

Obligatory for all Pre-Med. students. 

Lecture 2 hours per week; laboratory 6 hours per week. 

One semester. Five hours credit. 

301-302. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

The principles of Organic Chemistry and its relation to General 
Chemistry are emphasized. Typical organic compounds are studied. 
General reactions and characteristics are discussed, and many appli- 
cations to practical life are given. 

Obligatory for all Pre-Med. students and for those majoring in 
Chemistry. 

Lectures 2 hours per week; laboratory 4 hours per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

41 



Spring Hill College 

401-402a. elementary physical chemistry 

This course is intended to acquaint the student with the fundamental 
principles of chemical theory. The structure of matter, thermody- 
namics and electrochemistry are discussed. 

Obligatory for Chemistry and Biology majors. 

Lectures 3 hours per week. Three hours credit. 

401b-402b. ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL LABORATORY 

This course is intended to accompany 401-402. It includes the dif- 
ferent methods of molecular weight determination, electrical conduc- 
tance, and the determination of hydrogen-ion concentration colori- 
metrically and electrometrically. 

Elective for Chemistry and Biology majors. 

Three hours per week. Two hours credit. 

403-404. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 

A more extended discussion of the theory and practice of volumetric 
and gravimetric methods, including an introduction to electro- 
analysis. 

Lecture 2 hours per week; laboratory 6 hours per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

405-406. PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

An elementary course dealing with the Chemistry of the carbohy- 
drates, fats and proteins. The chemical basis underlying the phe- 
nomena of metabolism, enzyme absorption and digestion are dis- 
cussed. 

Lecture 3 hours per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

407-408. PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 

A laboratory course to accompany 405-406. 
Four hours per week. 
Two semesters. Four hours credit. 

Commerce 

The three subjects from which candidates for the B.S.C. Degree 
must select their Major and related Minor are Accounting, Business 
Administration and Economics. Courses offered in these fields are 
here listed. 



Accounting 



BOOKKEEPING AND ACCOUNTING 

The bookkeeping equation applied to accounts; increases and de- 
creases in proprietorship; journal and journalizing; the ledger; 
posting, and the trial balance; the work sheet, the balance sheet, 
and the profit and loss statement; adjusting and closing the ledger; 
special journals. 

No college credit. 

42 



Spring Hill College 

111-112. principles of accounting 
Meaning and purpose of accounting; the balance sheet; the state- 
ment of profit and loss; accounts and the ledger; adjusting and 
closing entries; books of original entry; controlling accounts; ac- 
crued and deferred items; the periodic summary ; partnerships; 
nature and characteristics of the corporation; the voucher system; 
accounting for manufacturing; cost accounting; consolidated state- 
ments; analysis and interpretation of financial statements. 

Six hours credit. 

211-212. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING 

Fundamental process of accounting; working papers; statements; 
corporations; actuarial science; receivables; inventories; consign- 
ments; installment sales; tangible fixed assets; investments; lia- 
bilities; funds and reserves; comparative statements; the analysis 
of working capital; profit and loss analysis; statement of applica- 
tion of funds. 

Six hours credit. 

311-312. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING 

Partnerships; venture accounts; insurance; receiver's accounts; 
realization and liquidation account; home office and branch account- 
ing; parent company and subsidiary accounting; consolidated state- 
ments; foreign exchange; estate and trusts; budgets; public 
accounts; bank accounting; stock brokerage. 

Six hours credit. 

313. ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

Scope and influence of accounting; elements of accounting; adjust- 
ing and closing entries; balance sheet; special statements and 
forms; miscellaneous accounting; balance inventory; comparisons 
and ratios; analyzing complete accounting reports; verification of 
financial statements. 

Three hours credit. 

411. COST ACCOUNTING 

The need and value of cost accounting; classifications of cost; 
process cost systems and specific order cost systems; manufacturing 
expense theory; accounting for material; accounting for labor costs; 
distribution of costs; debatable methods; relative values; establish- 
ment and uses of standard costs. 

Three hours credit. 

412 FEDERAL TAX ACCOUNTING 

Income tax legislation; returns for individuals; gross income; ex- 
empt income; deductions; net income; computation of individual 
taxes; returns for estates and trusts, partnerships and corporations; 
accounting procedure; administrative procedure; capital stock tax; 
estate tax; gift tax; excise taxes. 

Three hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

413. auditing and c.p.a. problems 

Qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the public auditor; ex- 
act rules covering every detail of making an audit of books and 
records of representative business concerns; methods of securing 
and handling engagements; working papers and audit reports; 
C.P.A. problems of an advanced nature presented and analyzed. 

Three hours credit. 

490. PREPARATIONS FOR THE C.P.A. CERTIFICATE 

Questions and problems based on examination given by the Ameri- 
can Institute of Accountants. Individual instruction given. 

Examinations for the certificate of Certified Public Accountant 
are held in Montgomery twice a year, in May and November. Appli- 
cations may be made to the Secretary of State. 

No college credit. 

Business Administration 

103. PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS 

Forms of business enterprise; financing, management; wages and 
wage systems; the control of labor; purchasing; selling; advertis- 
ing; traffic; foreign trade and ocean traffic; credit; forecasting 
business condition; banking; exchange; insurance; principles of 
accounting; financial statements; cost accounting; investments; 
causes of business failures and remedies. 

Three hours credit. 

121-2. SHORTHAND 

A thorough study of the principles of Gregg Shorthand with special 
emphasis on phonetics. Dictation of business letters and interpreta- 
tion of unseen passages of court testimony. 

No college credit. 

131-2. TYPEWRITING 

A first course for students who wish to learn the elements of type- 
writing technique and general use of the machine. 

No college credit. 

221-222. BUSINESS LAW 

Law* in general, its definition, origin and sources; written and un- 
written law; law and equity; contracts defined and classified; 
origin of property; title to personal property; mortgages and their 
uses. 

Six hours credit. 

301-302. CORPORATION FINANCE 

Principles of financing; forms of business enterprise; the corporate 
form and its status before the law; owned and borrowed capital; 
basis of capitalization; sources of capital funds; disposition of gross 
earning; budgets; reorganization. 

Six hours credit. 

322. MONEY AND BANKING 

Brief history of origin and development of banking; early banks and 
banking systems of United States; operation of the Federal Reserve 
System; foreign banking systems; classes of credit and credit in- 
struments; money, credit and prices; international exchange. 

Three hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

402. business and office administration 
Methods of organizing and controlling the work of industrial estab- 
lishments; selection of plant site; nearness to raw materials and 
to market; available labor supply; power and transportation; profit 
sharing; types of internal organization; office administration; per- 
sonnel; standards and records. 

Three hours credit. 

431. INSURANCE 

Underlying principles, important practices and principal legal phases 
of life, fire, marine, employers' liability, fidelity, corporate surety, 
title, and credit insurance; state regulation of companies; under- 
writers' associations and their work. 

Three hours credit. 

441. REAL ESTATE 

What real estate is; the origin and development of real estate own- 
ership; practical discussion of the details involved in the conduct 
of transactions of real estate activity. 

Three hours credit. 

442. INVESTMENTS 

A study of the underlying principles of investment credit; elements 
of sound investment and methods of computing net earnings; amor- 
tization rights and convertibles; the investment policies of individ- 
uals and institutions; the investment market and its relation to the 
money market. 

Three hours credit. 

Economics 

101. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY 

A comprehensive survey of man's utilization of the earth in making 
a living; a study of the world's major regions and of their present 
and potential production of food and raw materials for manufacture. 
Special attention will be devoted to the South in general and to 
Alabama in particular. 

Three hours credit. 

102. ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

The economic development of the United States from the period 
of settlement to the present time; origin and growth of leading 
American industries; changes in industrial organization; com- 
mercial policies; influence of economic conditions on political his- 
tory; problems of expansion. 

Three hours credit. 

201-201. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS 

An analysis of production, distribution, and consumption; theories 
concerning rents, profits, interest and wages. A discussion of pro- 
posed remedies for inequality of distribution of w'ealth; single tax, 
government ownership, profit-sharing, co-operative enterprises. 

Six hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

321. public finance 

The evolution of securities; organized security markets and their 
economic functions; origin, development, purpose, and operation of 
the New York Stock Exchange; the dangers and benefits of stock 
speculation; floor trader; specialist; odd-lot business; security 
deliveries, loans and transfers; the stock exchange and American 
business. 

Three hours credit. 

331. TRANSPORTATION PRINCIPLES 

Relation of transportation to industry and society; development and 
present status of American transportation systems; organization of 
transportation service; rates and regulations. 

Three hours credit. 

332. FOREIGN TRADE 

Foreign trade historically considered; products of foreign trade; 
trade barriers; modifications of tariffs; marketing of raw materials; 
marketing of manufactured products; the foreign firm and public 
law; settlement of disputes; protection against risks; combinations 
in world trade. 

Three hours credit. 

401. ELEMENTS OF STATISTICS 

An introduction to statistics; a brief consideration of statistical 
theory; collection, classification and presentation of economic data; 
construction of graphs and charts; study of index numbers; prob- 
lems of statistical research. 

Three hours credit. 

421. ADVERTISING AND SALESMANSHIP 

The specific purpose of advertising; the copy; slogans; trademarks; 
newspapers; magazines; advertising research; preparing and mak- 
ing the sales presentation; overcoming objections and closing the 
sale; sales promotion. 

Three hours credit. 

422. PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 

The marketing functions; marketing farm products; marketing raw 
materials; marketing manufactured products; distribution through 
brokers, jobbers, wholesalers, commission houses; market finance; 
market risk; market news; standardization; market price; the cost 
of marketing. 

Three hours credit. 

432. PUBLIC UTILITIES 

Characteristics of public utilities; regulation by franchises and com- 
missions; valuation; rate of return; rate structures; regulation of 
service, accounts and reports; public relations; public ownership. 

Three hours credit. 



Drawing 



101-2. MECHANICAL DRAWING 

Lettering, geometrical construction, orthographic projection, di- 
mensioning. 

Two semesters. Four hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

201-2. mechanical drawing 

Isometric and oblique drawing, intersections and development of 
surfaces, tracing. 
Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

203-4. DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY 

A critical study of the science of drawing. The location of points, 
lines, planes; single-curved surfaces; surfaces of revolution; tangent 
lines and planes; intersection of surfaces; shades and shadows; per- 
spective. 

Prerequisite, Solid Geometry. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

205. TOPOGRAPHICAL DRAWING 

Shades and shadows, representation of surface forms by contours 
and by shading with pencil, pen and colors. Topographical symbols, 
copying, enlarging and reducing maps. 

Two hours credit. 

206. MACHINE DRAWING 

Free-hand and mechanical drawing of machine parts and complete 
machines, piping plans, etc. 

Two hours credit. 



Education 



301. HISTORY OF EDUCATION IN THE U. S. 

This course begins with a study of the origin and development of 
the various school systems, denominational and public, in the United 
States, section by section. It then takes up the advancement made 
in elementary, secondary and higher education. The treatment of 
such topics as professional education, technical and agricultural edu- 
cation, the preparation of teachers, art and manual education, com- 
mercial education, educational associations, is included in the course. 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

308. educational psycholgy 

This course considers the nature, function and measurement of the 
original tendencies of the individual, and the modifications of them 
which the school endeavors to bring about. That this purpose may 
be better effected, the student is directed in the study of the laws 
of learning, the learning curve, the efficiency and permanence of 
learning, transfer of training, the result of exercise, the measure- 
ment of achievement, the use of tests, the new type examinations. 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

47 



Spring Hill College 

335. extra-curricular activities 

The purpose of this course is to instruct the students of education 
in the importance of student participation in school activities out- 
side the class room. Considerable time is devoted to the theory and 
practice of the teaching of athletic sports, football, baseball, basket- 
ball, track sports, and boxing. The fundamental principles of various 
football systems, rules, training, special plays are among the topics 
dealt with. There is explicit insistence upon the transfer of training 
in punctuality, promptitude in the execution of plays and other de- 
sirable qualities from the field of play to the regular work of the 
school and of after life. Among other student activities discussed, 
are the following: student council, class organization; club, the 
poetry club, the dramatic club, the literary society, the debating so- 
ciety; musical organizations — the choir, the glee club, the band, the 
orchestra; the assembly; the commencement; the library; the study 
hall; the athletic association; school publications — the annual, the 
school magazine; publicity and public relations. 

Three hours credit. 
Given every year. 

336. PRINCIPLES OF HIGH SCHOOL TEACHING 

This course studies the individual at the stage of his secondary edu- 
cation, his native and acquired tendencies to action, and deduces 
principles by which the teacher may be guided in his attempt to 
direct the interest and secure the attention of the pupil. Among the 
topics considered are: the aims in instruction, the class exercise; 
the essentials of good questioning, the modes of instruction; the 
importance of study; the prelection or assignment; the repetition or 
recitation; standards and measurements; the individual and social 
elements in secondary instruction. 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

435-436. OBSERVATION AND PRACTICE TEACHING 

One and one-half or two semester hours each session. Schedule to 
be arranged by each student individually with the head of the de- 
partment of education. 

In order to supplement its instruction in educational principles, 
aims, methods, curricula and procedure, and to cultivate professional 
skill in teaching, Spring Hill College has secured the co-operation 
of the McGill Institute. Through the courtesy of its administrators 
and teachers, McGill Institute thus becomes the proving ground for 
the professional students of the Department of Education, who have 
free access to its classrooms for observation of the methods prac- 
ticed therein and for supervised practice teaching. Co-operating with 
the State Department of Education, Spring Hill College requires 
that its candidates for degrees with a major in education present a 
minimum of 3 semester hours in observation and practice teaching 
with a minimum of 30 full periods of class teaching. 

Three hours credit. 
Given every year. 

48 



Spring Hill College 

M. MATERIALS AND METRODS OF HIGH SCHOOL TEACHING 

The object of this course is to give the student an intimate knowl- 
edge of the reason, aim and material of the chief subjects found 
in the high school curricula, and the recognized methods by which 
they are taught. The student should emerge from the course with 
such a comprehensive view of its proper distribution that he should 
be capable of constructing in it a satisfactory curriculum. 

462M. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

466M. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING HISTORY 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

469BM. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING BIOLOGY 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

469PM. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING PHYSICS 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

470CM. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING CHEMISTRY 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

472M. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING FRENCH 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

475M. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING LATIN 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

477M. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING SPANISH 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

494M. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING PHYS. EDUCATION 

Three hours credit. 
Given every year. 



English 



1. GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION 

A course in the essentials of grammar and in the various modes of 
composition. Required of Freshman students who are deficient in the 
theory or practice of correct English. 

No credit. 

101-2. ADVANCED RHETORIC 

A course in the theory of rhetoric and the study of style based on 
reading, analysis and discussion of works of English prose authors. 
Insistence on the principles of literature and frequent practice in 
composition. Required of Freshmen, unless excused by examination. 

Six hours credit. 

49 



Spring Hill College 

103. POETRY 

A course in the study of the nature and elements of poetry, prin- 
ciples of versification, its various kinds, etc. Reading, analysis and 
appreciation of the chief poets, partly in class study, partly in as- 
signments. Frequent practice in composition. 

Three hours credit. 

104. TYPES OF ENGLISH PROSE 

A study of the chief forms of prose writing, narrative and expository. 
Required readings in the short story and the essay with class dis- 
cussions and frequent exercises in composition. 

Three hours credit. 

105-6. BUSINESS ENGLISH 

A course intended for students majoring in commerce. It comprises 
the theory and practice of effective expression in letters, reports, di- 
gests, and so forth. Models are studied, discussed, analyzed. Original 
themes weekly, with daily work in analyzing problems and outlines. 

Six hours credit. 

201-2. SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE 

A study of the historical background of the chief masterpieces of 
English literature from Beowulf to Thomas Hardy. Readings in the 
principal authors and critical papers at weekly intervals. 
Required of all Sophomores. 

Six hours credit. 

203. THE SHORT STORY 

This course will study the rise and development of the Short Story 
from earliest times up to the present. While stories of other litera- 
tures will be carefully discussed, special attention will be directed 
to the American short story. Students will be required to analyze 
various short stories, and to write at least one original short story. 

Three hours credit. 

204. THE DRAMA 

The theory of the drama will be studied by means of lectures and 
assignments in its history and development; reading, analysis and 
study of works of principal English dramatists, especially Shakes- 
peare; composition in dialogue, dramatic sketches, playlets, and a.t 
least one complete drama will be required. 

Three hours credit. 

301. THE ENGLISH NOVEL 

The principal purpose of this course is to study the technique of the 
novel and the various schools of fiction and their tendencies with 
special attention to their ethical and literary value. Reading and 
discussion of noted novels. 

Three hours credit. 

302. SHAKESPEARE 

Shakespeare's life, influence, sources of his drama; an acquaintance 
by reading and assignments With the Shakespearian literature of 
criticism; reading, analysis and study of Shakespeare's plays, es- 
pecially in comparison with those of other dramatists. 

303. AESTHETICS AND LITERARY CRITICISM 

The philosophical basis of aesthetics, the elements of taste; the 
theory of criticism; a survey of critical standards; a study of the 
Schools of criticism and of the work of the chief literary critics. 
Critical papers on assigned subjects will be required. 

Three hours credit. 

50 



Spring Hill College 

304. NEWMAN 

A study of the Present Position of Catholics in England, Idea of a 
University, Apologia pro Vita Sua,, with detailed analysis of thought 
and examination of literary merits. 

Required of all majors in English. 

Three hours credit. 

305. MILTON 

A survey course in the life and work of Milton, with special em- 
phasis on the longer poems. 

Three hours credit. 

309. ENGLISH LITERATURE 

From Beowulf to 1500. A series of lectures on Old English and 
Middle English Literature. Among the authors studied will be such 
as Caedmon, Bede, Alfred the Great, Aelfric and Chaucer. Attention 
will also be directed to a study of the early ballads and lyrics. Based 
on James McCullum's 'The Beginnings to 1500.' (Scribner's Eng- 
lish Literature Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

310. ENGLISH LITERATURE 

The Renaissance. The student will have an opportunity in this course 
to study such great writers as Sir Thomas Wyatt, Henry Howard, 
Earl of Surrey, Sir Philip Sydney and Edmund Spenser. In this 
course the plays of Marlowe and Shakespeare will be especially 
stressed. Based on Robert Whitney Bolwell's 'The Renaissance.' 
(Scribner's English Literature Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

311. ENGLISH LITERATURE 

The Seventeenth Century. This course will include a careful survey 
of the Puritan Age and that of the Restoration. Milton's Paradise 
Lost and Dryden's Hind and the Panther will be carefully studied 
and discussed. Based on Evert Mordecai Clark's 'The Seventeenth 
Century.' (Scribner's English Literature Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

312. ENGLISH LITERATURE 

The Eighteenth Century. In this course lectures will be given on 
Daniel Defoe, Addison and Steele, Alexander Pope and his circle, 
with a thorough study of the social and religious backgrounds of the 
period. Based on Joseph P. Blickensderfer's 'The Eighteenth Cen- 
tury.' (Scribner's English Literature Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

313. ENGLISH LITERATURE 

The Romantic Period. This important period in the development of 
English poetry and aesthetic ideals will be studied with a view to the 
appreciation of its historical and religious background. Bernbaum's 
"Guide Through the Romantic Movement" will be used and wide 
reading required in Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Shelley, 
Lamb, Hazlitt, and DeQuincey. 

Three hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

314. english literature 
The Victorian Period. The most important developments in the novel 
and drama. Impact of the Industrial Revolution on literature and 
thought. Particular study of Carlyle, Ruskin, Newman; Tennyson, 
Browning, Arnold. 

Three hours credit. 

French 

*1. ELEMENTARY FRENCH 

The Article, the Noun, the Adjective, the Numerals, the Pronouns. 
Conjugation of regular verbs and of the more common irregular 
verbs. Frequent themes. 
First Semester. No college credit. 

*2. ELEMENTARY FRENCH 

Irregular verbs. Use of Moods and Tenses. Government of Verbs. 
Order of words in the Sentence. Frequent themes. 
Second semester. No college credit. 

101. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 

Review of Syntax. Prose Composition. Reading of graduated texts: 
Chateaubriand, de Maistre, Danemarie. 

Three hours credit. 

102. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 

Continuation of preceding course. 

Three hours credit. 

201. ADVANCED FRENCH 

Survey of the History of French Literature, accompanied by written 
work in advanced prose composition. Text: Harper's French An- 
thology. 

Three hours credit. 

202. ADVANCED FRENCH 

Continuation of preceding course. 

Three hours credit. 

301-2. THE FRENCH NOVEL 

A detailed study of different types of the French novel: Classical, 
Romantic, Realistic, and Contemporary, with reference to theme, 
characters, treatment, and style. 
One year course. Six hours credit. 

401. THE FRENCH DRAMA 

A study of the technique of the French drama. Special stress will 
be laid on the classical tragedy, Racine and Corneille. 

Three hours credit. 

402. THE FRENCH COMEDY 

A reading course with special attention to the w'orks of Moliere. 

Three hours credit. 

♦Courses 1 and 2 are required of students who choose French for their 
college modern language and cannot present 2 High School units. 

52 



Spring Hill College 
German 

*1. ELEMENTARY GERMAN 

The article. Declension of nouns, adjectives, and pronouns. Conju- 
gation of the auxiliary, weak, and strong verbs. Easy reading. Fre- 
quent themes. 

No college credit. 

*2. ELEMENTARY GERMAN 

Prefix verbs, reflexive verbs, modal auxiliaries. Syntax. Easy read- 
ing. Frequent themes. 

No college credit. 

101. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 

Review of syntax. Prose composition. Reading of graduated German 
texts. 

Three hours credit. 

102. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 

Continuation of preceding course. 

Three hours credit. 

201. ADVANCED GERMAN 

Advanced composition. Survey of the history of German literature. 

Three hours credit. 

202. ADVANCED GERMAN 

Continuation of Course 201. 

Three hours credit. 

301-2. GERMAN DRAMA 

Technique of the drama in German, with special study of Goethe and 
Schiller. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

401-402. THE GERMAN NOVEL 

A reading course in the modern novel. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

Greek 

*1. ELEMENTARY GREEK 

The article, noun, adjective, pronoun, numeral. Conjugation of pure 
and contract verbs. Simple themes. 

No college credit. 

*2. ELEMENTARY GREEK 

Liquid, mute, mi, and irregular verbs. Syntax. Reading of Xenophon. 

No college credit. 



♦Courses 1 and 2 are required of those students who choose German 
for their college modern language, and cannot present 2 High School 
units in the subject. 

♦Courses 1 and 2 are required of Greek students presenting no high 
school units in Greek. 

53 



Spring Hill College 

101. intermediate greek 

Review of syntax. Prose composition. Reading of works of St. John 
Chrysostom, St. Basil. 

Three hours credit. 

102. INTERMEDIATE GREEK 

Prose composition based on Arnold. Reading of Demosthenes : Philip- 
pics, Olynthiacs. 

Three hours credit. 

201. ADVANCED GREEK 

Study of Greek Poetry. Prosody and Versification. Reading of Ho- 
mer's Iliad. 

Three hours credit. 

202. ADVANCED GREEK 

A study of the Greek drama, with required reading of Sophocles, 
Oedipus Tyrannus; and Euripides, Hecuba. 

Three hours credit. 

301. SURVEY OF GREEK LITERATURE 

Readings from various authors. 

Three hours credit. 

302. POETRY 

A study of Greek Lyric Poetry. Selections from the Greek Anthology. 

Three hours credit. 



History 



101. EARLY MEDIEVAL HISTORY 

Migration of Nations. The Islam, the Franks, the Lombards, and the 
Holy See. Church and State. The Carolingians. The Northmen in 
Europe. The Making of Germany and the Rise of the Empire. Lay- 
Investiture. 

Three hours credit. 

102. THE MIDDLE AGES 

The Crusades. The Hohenstaufens. Invasion of the Mongols. Saint 
Louis. Life in the Middle Ages. The Exile of the Papacy. The Wes- 
tern Schism. The Hundred Years' War. The War of the Roses. Con- 
solidation of European Monarchies. 

Three hours credit. 

103. BACKGROUNDS OF CIVILIZATION 

(Introduction to History). The aim of this course is to orient the 
student so that he may view in its proper setting the status of the 
world today. That this may be done in a reasonable way, the contrib- 
utory causes to the present intellectual, moral and religious culture 
are traced from their probable origins. In the same way the pro- 
gressive stages of the world's economic and political development 
as recorded in history are followed from the remote past to the 
present actual situation. 

Three hours credit. 

54 



Spring Hill College 

104. backgrounds of civilization 

(Introduction to History Continued). This course reviews the revo- 
lution in industry brought on by the Machine Age. It points out the 
sociological and economic problems arising from the centralization 
of capital and mass production which follow'ed in the wake of new 
discoveries in science and industrial machines. The new facilities in 
world communication and transportation are considered together 
with the complicated systems of distribution and finance which they 

connote. 

Three hours credit. 

201. RENAISSANCE and REVOLUTION 

The Revival of Learning, of Art and Politics. Social Conditions. The 
Protestant Revolution in Germany, England and Scotland. Catholic 
Revival. The Huguenot Wars in France. The Revolt of the Nether- 
lands. The Thirty Years' War. The Puritan Revolution. The Age of 
Louis XIV. The War of the Spanish Succession. The Church and the 
State. The Making of Russia. The Rise of Prussia. The Downfall of 

Poland. The French Revolution. Napoleon Bonaparte. 

Three hours credit. 

202. EUROPE SINCE 1814 

The Industrial Revolution. England and France in the Nineteenth 
Century. The Unification of Germany. The Unification of Italy. The 
Social, Political and Religious Conditions in Europe. The Eastern 
Question. The Partition of Africa. The World War of 1914. Recon- 
struction after World War. 

Three hours credit. 

301. AMERICAN HISTORY TO THE RECONSTRUCTION PERIOD 

This course, with the following, aims to bring into relief the out- 
standing influences that have shaped the history of the United 
States from the Colonial Period to our own, stressing for this pur- 
pose topics of import for the social, economic and political develop- 
ment of the nation. First semester. 

Three hours credit. 

302. AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE THE RECONSTRUCTION PERIOD 

A course similar to the preceding, stressing in its latest phases the 
conditions and circumstances that led to America's participation in 
the Great War, with the resulting stimulus to a clearer national con- 
sciousness of the value and significance of American citizenship. 

Three hours credit. 

401. HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA 

European Background. Early discoveries and settlements in the is- 
lands and on the mainland of North, Central and South America. 
Civilization of the Natives. Spanish and Portuguese Colonial Sys- 
tems. Contribution of the Jesuit and Franciscan Missionaries to 
Culture and Civilization. Abuses of the Spanish Government. The 
Struggles for Independence. History of Independent Mexico and 
Central American Countries after 1821. Economic, Social and Politial 
Life. 



Three hours credit. 



55 



Spring Hill College 

402. HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA (Continued) 

History of the Independent Countries of South America, Economic, 
Social, and Political Life. The Monroe Doctrine. Significance and In- 
fluence. Relation of the Latin American Countries with one another, 
the United States and the World. Pan-Americanism. Latin America 
and the World War. Present Situation and Outlook. 

Three hours credit. 

403. CONTEMPORARY HISTORY 

The Peace Treaties. Post-war readjustments. The League of Na- 
tions : its early successes, later failures, present position. The World 
Court. Reparations and war debts. The rise of dictatorships. Dis- 
armament Conferences. The Stresa Front. Colonial Problems. Latest 
developments in African and Far Eastern Imperialism. Dangers to- 
day. The road to peace. 

Three hours credit. 



Latin 



*1. elementary latin 
Declension of nouns, adjectives, pronouns. The numerals. Conjuga- 
tion of regular verbs; verbs in *io"; deponent and semi-deponent 
verbs; periphrastic conjugation. Themes. 

Texts: New Yenni Latin Grammar; Loyola Latin Elements. 

No college credit. 

*2. ELEMENTARY LATIN 

Irregular verbs. Syntax of cases, moods, and tenses. Themes. 
Texts: same as for Course 1; Caesar, Helvetian War. 

No college credit. 

v ■ 
**3-4. ELEMENTARY LATIN 

Review of Syntax. Elementary prose Composition based on Cicero. 

Texts: New Yenni Latin Grammar; Cicero, Catilinarian Orations; 
Vergil, Selections. 

No college credit. 

101. INTERMEDIATE LATIN 

Prose Composition. Cicero. 

Texts: Arnold's Latin Prose Composition, Part I; Cicero, Pro Lege 
Manilia or Pro Milone. 

Three hours credit. 

102. INTERMEDIATE LATIN 

Latin Prose Composition. Sallust. Tacitus. Livy 

Texts: Arnold's Latin Prose Composition, Part II; Anthology of 
Roman Historians. 

Three hours credit. 



♦Courses 1 and 2 are required of those student who present no high 
school credits in Latin. 

**Courses 3 and 4 are required of those students who present less 
than 4 years of high school Latin. 

56 



Spring Hill College 

201. advanced latin 

A study of Latin Poetry. Prosody. Versification. Horace. Ovid. 
Text: Horace, Odes and Epodes; Ovid. 



202. ADVANCED LATIN 

A study of Roman Satire. Horace. Juvenal. 

301. A STUDY OF ROMAN PLAYS 

Plautus. Terence. 

302. ECCLESIASTICAL LATIN 

Hymns and Homilies, Selected. 



Three hours credit. 



Three hours credit. 



Three hours credit. 



Three hours credit. 



Mathematics 

1. ALGEBRA 

A brief review of elementary algebra. A detailed study of the third 
semester of high school algebra. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of high school algebra. Required of 
all students offering but one unit of high school algebra.. 

Three lectures per week. First semester. No credit. 

2. SOLID GEOMETRY 

An elementary course in the geometry of three dimensions. Equi- 
valent to high school solid geometry. 

Prerequisite: high school plane geometry. Required of all stu- 
dents having no high school credit in this subject. 

Three lectures per week. Second semester. No credit. 

101-2. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS 

An introductory course. The essentials of algebra, trigonometry, an- 
alytic geometry, and calculus built up around the function concept. 
Applications to science and engineering. 

Prerequisite: Three semesters of high school algebra. Required 
of all majors in Mathematics, Engineering, Physics, Chemistry and 
Biology. 
Four lectures per week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

103. COLLEGE ALGEBRA 

Rules of Algebra. Laws of Exponents. Linear and quadratic equa- 
tions. Progressions. Binomial theorem. Logarithms. Determinants. 
Solution of equations. 

Prerequisite: Three semesters of high school algebra. Required 
of all students not taking mathematics 101-2. Three lectures per 
Week. First semester. Three hours credit. 

104. PLANE TRIGONOMETRY 

The six elementary functions. Solution of right and oblique tri- 
angles. Graphs. Logarithms. Solution of trigonometric equations. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 103. Required of all students not 
taking Mathematics 101-2. 

Three lectures per week. Second semester. Three hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

105. spherical trigonometry 
Similar to Mathematics 104 but applied to a spherical surface. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 104. Required in certain engineering 
courses. 

Two lectures per week. First semester. Two hours credit. 

107-8.— BUSINESS MATHEMATICS 

Percentage. Simple and compound interest. Bank trade and cash 
discounts. Equations of accounts. Mathematics of sinking funds. 
Bond values and asset valuation. 

Prerequisite: High school algebra. Required of all majors in B.S.C. 

Three lectures per week. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

201. DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS 

Functions, algebraic and transcendental. Limits. Continuity. Slopes. 
Maxima and Minima. Derivatives. Differentials. Geometrical and 
physical application. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101-2 or 103, 104, and 203. Required of 
all majors in Mathematics, Engineering, Physics, and Chemistry. 
Four lectures per week. First semester. Four hours credit. 

202. INTEGRAL CALCULUS 

The nature of integration. Integrals. Definite integrals. Reduction 
formulas. Geometrical and physical applications. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 201. Required of all majors in Mathe- 
matics, Engineering, Physics, and Chemistry. 

Four lectures per week. Second semester. Four hours credit. 

203. PLANE ANALYTIC GEOMETRY 

Loci and their equations. The straight line. The circle. The conic 
sections. Transformation of co-ordinates. Polar co-ordinates. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101-2 or 103 and 104. 

Required for all majors in Mathematics, and in certain Engineer- 
ing courses. 

Three lectures per week. First semester. Three hours credit. 

204. SOLID ANALYTIC GEOMETRY 

A three dimensional treatment of the point, line, plane, and surface. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 203. Required in certain Engineering 
courses. 

Two lectures per week. Second semester. Two hours credit. 

301. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 

Elementary forms of ordinary differential equations of the first and 
second order. Application to science and engineering. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 201-2. Physics 201-2. Required of all 
majors in Mathematics or Physics. 

Three lectures per week. First semester. Three hours credit. 

302. ADVANCED CALCULUS 

Multiple integrals. Elliptic integrals. Partial differentiation. Taylor's 
Theorem. Fourrier series. Expansion of functions. Complex variables. 
Hyperbolic functions. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 201-2. Required of all majors in Mathe- 
matics or Physics. 

Four lectures per week. Second semester. Four hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

401. higher algebra 

Theory of numbers and invarients. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 301, 302. Required of all majors in 
Mathematics. 

Three lectures per week. First semester. Three hours credit. 

402. THEORY OF EQUATIONS 

Binomial equation. Roots of higher degree equations. Numerical so- 
lutions. Theory of the general system of linear equations. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 401. Required of all majors in Mathe- 
matics. 

Three lectures per week. Second semester. Three hours credit. 



Phil 



osophy 



201. LOGIC 

A. Formal Logic 

Simple apprehension, classification of ideas; verbal terms, the classi- 
fication and use; logical division, definition; judgments and propo- 
sitions, their division according to quality, quantity and matter; op- 
position, equivalence, and conversion of propositions. Reasoning; 
fundamental principles of reasoning; the syllogism, its laws, figures 
and modes, other forms of reasoning, induction, analogy; classifica- 
tion of arguments according to their validity; sophisms; method; 
the circle. 

B. Applied Criteriology 

Conceptual truth and the possibility of attaining it; state of the 
mind with regard to truth. Certitude; its nature, kind; Skepticism; 
the Methodical Doubt; opinion, trustworthiness of the human fa- 
culties for the attainment of truth; consciousness, the external 
senses; the intellect, Nominalism, Conceptualism, exaggerated and 
moderate realism. Sources of certitude; human testimony; universal 
testimony; Divine testimony; tradition; history; the new criticism; 
objective evidence. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Four hours credit. 

202. GENERAL METAPHYSICS 

A. Ontology 

Being and its transcendental attributes; real being, logical being; 
extension, comprehension, analogy, unity, truth, goodness. State of 
being: Actual and possible; proximate and ultimate; foundation of 
intrinsic possibility. Kinds of being: substance, accident; the Aris- 
totelian categories. Causality. Causes in general; material, formal 
and efficient; the first cause; final cause; exemplary cause. Perfec- 
tion of being; simple and composite; finite and infinite; contingent 
and necessary; time and eternity; order, beauty, sublimity. 

B. Cosmology 

General properties of corporeal substance: quantity; continuous ex- 
tension, condensation and rarefaction; impenetrability, space, place; 
motion, time; change, substance, accidents. Intrinsic constituents of 
corporeal substances; Atomism; Dynamism; Hylomorphism. Organic 
life; the vital principle, nutrition, growth; reproduction; sensitive 
life, sense perceptions, sensuous appetite, spontaneous locomotion; 
the dynamic principle; the substantial form: Darwinism rejected. 

Three hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

301. psychology 

The human intellect and its proper object; its spirituality proved by 
its acts; origin of ideas; innate ideas; Empiricism and Ontologism 
rejected. The human will and its formal object; its freedom; its con- 
trol of the other faculties. Nature of the human soul; a substantial 
principle, simple, spiritual, immortal, its union with the body; its 
origin. The unity and antiquity of the human race. 
Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy Four hours credit. 

302. SPECIAL METAPHYSICS (Theodicy) 

The existence of God; metaphysical, physical and moral proofs. The 
nature and attributes of God; His self-existence, infinity, unity, im- 
mutability, eternity and immensity. 

His operative attributes: a) The Divine intelligence; His knowl- 
edge of pure intelligence, of vision; scientia media of futuribles. 
b) the Divine will; Its holiness; Its primary and secondary objects; 
Its relation toward moral and physical evil. Action of God in the 
universe; creation; conservation; concurrence; Divine providence; 
miracles. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Three hours credit. 

305. HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY 

Oriental Philosophy; the Greeks: Socrates, Plato, Aristotle. The 
Gnostics and Neo-Platonists. The early Fathers of the Church. Med- 
ieval Philosophy. The rival schools and tendencies among the 
Scholastics. The Thomistic synthesis. 

Two hours credit. 

306. HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY 

Descartes and his followers; Malebranche, Locke, Hume. Voltaire 
and the encyclopaedists. Leibnitz. Sensists and the Scottish School. 
The Transcendentalists : Kant, Fichte, Schelling and their schools 
of thought. The Neo-Kantians. Neo-Scholasticism and the present 
outlook. 

Two hours credit. 

401. GENERAL ETHICS 

Ethics defined. The material and formal objects of ethics. The hu- 
man act; the voluntary, the free and deliberate. Causes modifying 
the voluntary and free. The ultimate end of man. The Eternal Law; 
the Natural Law. Moral obligation defined; source of moral obli- 
gation. The sources of positive law in the natural law; essential 
conditions of positive law. The morality of human acts and the 
norm of morality. Refutation of hedonism. Utilitarianism, Moral 
Sensism and Moral Rationalism. The specific determinants of mor- 
ality. Merit and demerit. The perfect sanction of the moral law'. 
The obligation of following the dictates of conscience. Natural 
rights. Virtues and vices. Character. 

Four hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

402. special ethics 

Man's duties towards God. Man's duties towards himself. Man's 
duties of justice and charity towards others. The Natural Right of 
private ownership; limitations on the exercise of the right. The 
duties of wealth. Refutation of irresponsible ownership. Explana- 
tion and critique of Marxian Socialism, Agrarian Socialism and Syn- 
dicalism. Modes of acquiring property. The obligations and rights 
arising from contracts. The duties and rights of buyer and seller, 
of employer and employe. Society in general. The Family: Divine 
institution of marriage; its primary and secondary ends; the unity 
and indissolubility of marriage; parental authority. Rights and du- 
ties of parents in education. Civil society: its nature, origin, end. 
Origin of civil authority and government by consent of the governed. 
Social and distributive justice. Specific forms of government. The 
repression of crime and capital punishment. The moral law govern- 
ing international relations. Conditions of a just war. 

Four hours credit. 

Physical Education 

Ample opportunity is offered the student for physical exercise in 
many forms of competitive sport. Intramural leagues are organized 
in football, basketball, and baseball. Boxing matches are staged. 
Swimming in the college lake, golf on the college course, and tennis on 
the Mobile Hall courts are all the year sports. 

To stimulate students not naturally prone to systematic exercise, 
and to create in them a useful interest in some form of recreational ac- 
tivity, all Freshmen and Sophomores are required to register in one 
or other of the courses here listed : 

101-102. FRESHMAN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Freshmen must choose one of the following sections: 

Section A. — Major Sports. Competition for the Freshman team in 
current sport. 

Section B. — Minor Sports. Two hours per week of Tennis, Golf, In- 
door Baseball, Swimming. 

Section C. — Remedial Exercise. Light activities for those unable to 
follow more violent sports. 

One hour credit. 

201-202. SOPHOMORE PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Sophomores must choose one of the following sections: 

Section A. — Major Sports. Competition for the Varsity team in cur- 
rent sport. 

Section B. — Swimming. Three hours per week of swimming. 
Section C. — Indoor Baseball. Tennis. Two hours per week. 

One hour credit. 

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Spring Hill College 
Physics 



201-2. GENERAL PHYSICS 

The essentials of the classical concepts of mechanics, heat, elec- 
tricity, and light. Introduction to the modern physics of the structure 
of matter. Application to science and industry. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101-2, or 103 and 104. Required of all 
majors in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, or Mathematics. 

Three lectures and one laboratory per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

203. SURVEYING 

Theory, use, and adjustment of instruments. Methods of computa- 
tion. Practical field work. Topographic map-making. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 104, or 101-2. Recommended for all 
majors in Engineering. 

One lecture and six hours of field work per week. 

One semester. Three hours credit. 

301-2. ELECTRICITY 

Electrical nature of matter. Source of potentials. Production of cur- 
rents. Flow of electricity through vacuum, gases, liquids, and solids. 
Circuit problems. Magnetic phenomena. Thermo-electricity. Vacuum 
tubes. Application. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201-2; Mathematics 201-2. Required of all 
majors in physics. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

303-4. ATOMIC PHYSICS 

Atomic theories. The structure of atoms and molecules. The mech- 
anics of matter. Corpuscular theories of light. Interaction of radia- 
tion and matter. Spectral lines. X-rays. Infra-red rays. Quantum 
theory. Relativity. Metaphysics. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201-2; Chemistry 101-2. Mathematics 201-2 
recommended. Required of all majors in Physics. Optional with Bi- 
ology 101-2 for majors in Chemistry. 

Three lectures per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

305-6. ASTRONOMY 

A general study of the solar system and the sidereal universe. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201-2; Mathematics 101-2; 201-2 recommen- 
ded. Recommended for majors in Physics or Mathematics. 

Three lectures per week. 

One or Two Semesters. Three or six hours credit. 

307-8. ANALYTICAL MECHANICS 

A study of statics, kinetics, and dynamics. Application to physics 
and engineering. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201-2. Mathematics 201-2, 301 recommended. 
Required of all majors in Physics or Mathematics. 
Three lectures per week. 
Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

309. physical optics 

Dispersion. Interference. Diffraction. Double refraction. Polarization. 
Magneto-optics. Spectroscopy. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201-2; Mathematics 201. Required of all 
majors in Physics. 

Tw'o lectures and one laboratory period per week. 

Three hours credit. 

310. THERMODYNAMICS 

The nature of heat. The phenomena of radiation, conduction, and 
convection. The law of Conservation of Energy, Entropy, Free 
Energy. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201-2; Mathematics 301. Required of all 
majors in Physics. 

Three lectures per week. 

Second semester. Three hours credit. 

401-2. ADVANCED ELECTRICITY 

The vacuum tube as an oscillator, amplifier, and detector. Electro- 
magnetic waves and antennas. Ultra high frequency phenomena. 

Prerequisites: Physics 301-2; Mathematics 301. Recommended for 
all majors in Physics. 

Two lectures per week and one laboratory period. 

One or two semesters. Three or six hours credit. 

403. SEMINAR 

Reports on recent experimental and mathematical papers. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Recommended for all majors in 
Physics. 

Two semesters. One hour credit. 

Political Science 

101. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 

American National Government. The historical background of the 
Federal Constitution and of political issues in the United States, and 
the organization and functions of the National Government. The 
President. The Cabinet. The Senate. The House of Representatives. 
The Supreme Court and the Subordinate Federal Courts. Local and 
State Government in the United States. The place of the States in 
the Nation. The State Constitutions. The State Legislature. The 
State Courts. Organization and functions of adminisration in coun- 
ties and cities. 

Three hours credit. 

102. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT 

A comparative study of the governmental organization and adminis- 
tration of the principal European nations. 

Three hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

201. party politics 

The development of political parties in the United States. Import- 
ance of the extra-constitutional element in American Government. 
Party platforms. Presidential campaigns and elections. The nomin- 
ating machinery; the Presidential primary and the nominating con- 
vention. Party patronage. The spoils system and civil service reform. 
State parties and practical politics in local government. 

Three hours credit. 

202. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 

Fundamental principles of the United States Constitution viewed in 
the light of their history, development and application. The making 
of the Constitution. The Constitution regarded as a grant of power. 
Federal powers and State powers. The principle of "checks and 
balances." The doctrine of Judicial Supremacy. Constitutional Limi- 
tations on Legislative Pow'er. Limits of the Police Power of the 
States. Guarantees of the Fourteenth Amendment. Religious Liberty. 
The Fifteenth Amendment and the Negro Problem. State Consti- 
tutions. 

Three hours credit. 



Psychology 



301. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 

The normal functioning of the mind. Proper object of the intellect. 
Origin of ideas. Nature and relationship of the various faculties of 
the soul. 

Three hours credit. 

308. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

The nature and laws of learning. Conditions most favorable to ef- 
ficient and economical learning. Permanence of learning, transfer 
of training, measurement of achievement. Prerequisite: Psychology 
301. 

Three hours credit. 

402. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Relation of the abnormal to normal in psychology. Present-day con- 
ception of mental disorders. The chief types. Remote causes: in- 
herited emotional instability, environment. Proximate or precipi- 
tating causes. Detailed study of examples of major classifications. 
Treatment. 



Three hours credit. 



Public Speaking 



201. THE OCCASIONAL PUBLIC ADDRESS 

Informal public address: the presentation of business propositions 
before small or large audiences; impromptu and extempore speak- 
ing; after-dinner talks. Speeches for various occasions. Class ex- 
ercises, individual criticism, and conferences. 

Two hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

202. argumentation and debating 

Briefing of arguments. Methods of development and arrangement. 
Exposure of common fallacies in argumentation. The essentials of 
parliamentary law and practice. The manner of conducting deliber- 
ative assemblies. Class exercises, criticism, and conferences. 

Two hours credit. 



Religion 



*101. THE COMMANDMENTS OF GOD 

The Catholic theory of Morality. The fundamental obligations of the 
Christian. Detailed study of the various commandments with ap- 
plication to practical cases. 

*102. THE SEVEN SACRAMENTS 

An advanced study of the meaning and value of the Sacraments. 
Their place in the Catholic economy. 
Two semesters Two hours credit. 

201-202. CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS 

Revelation and the Church of Christ. A study of Christianity as a 
revealed religion. Divine institution of the Church. Marks of the 
Church. Its end and constitution. 

Required of Catholic Sophomores. 

Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

301-302. CHRISTIAN LIFE AND WORSHIP 

A study of the vital forces of the corporate worship of the Catholic 
religion that contribute to the upbuilding of individual character and 
social solidarity. The Mass, the crowning act of Christian Worship. 

Required of Catholic Juniors. 

Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

401. CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ORDER 

A study of the ideal social order as delineated in the Papal Ency- 
clicals, Rerum Novarum and Quadragesimo Anno. Rejection of the 
opposite extremes of Communism and Capitalism. 

Required of Catholic Seniors. 

One semester. One hour credit. 

402. CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE 

Catholic doctrine on the morality of sex. The Sacrament of Matri- 
mony. Premarital chastity. Prenuptial requirements. Rights, duties 
and graces of married couple. 

Required of Catholic Seniors. 

One semester. One hour credit. 



♦These two courses are ordinarily required of all Catholic Freshmen. 

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Spring Hill College 

113-114. comparative religion 

Definition and division of religions. A general history of the world's 
great religions with stress on the common factors and characteristic 
differences. 

Required of Non-Catholic Freshmen and Sophomores. Given al- 
ternate years, 1935, 1937, etc. 

Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

213-214. BIBLICAL CRITICISM 

The notion of inspiration. Application to the books of the New Testa- 
ment. Method and spirit of higher criticism. Historical value of New 
Testament. Difficulties answered. 

Required of Non-Catholic Freshmen and Sophomores. Given al- 
ternate years, 1934, 1936, etc. 

Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

313-314. ANALYSIS OF FAITH 

Faith, its nature and norm. The act of faith. Relation of reason and 
revelation. Faith and Science. 

Required of Non-Catholic Juniors and Seniors. Given alternate 
years, 1935, 1937, etc. 

Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

413-414. CHRISTIAN MORALS 

The obligation of morality. Bases in reason and aids from Faith. 
Practical applications. 

Required of Non-Catholic Juniors and Seniors. Given alternate 
years, 1934, 1936, etc. 

Two semesters. Two hours credit. 



Sociology 



101. ELEMENTARY 



Definition of Sociology: its relation to Ethics, Revealed Religion, 
Political and Economic Science. The fundamental facts and princi- 
ples relating to the individual, the family and the state, and their 
mutual relations. 

Three hours credit. 

102. ELEMENTARY (continued) 

Fundamental facts and principles relating to private property, capi- 
tal, labor, and international society. 

Three hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 
201-202. economic relations 

Private ownership: rights and duties. False theories of property 
rights. Present distribution and control of wealth. Distributive own- 
ership of the means of production. Government ownership. Co- 
operatives; consumers; producers; credit. Government supervision 
of industry, commerce and finance in the interests of the common 
good. Capitalism as a vicious system: irresponsible ownership, free 
competition, economic domination, economic nationalism and im- 
perialism, financial internationalism. The problem of wages: the in- 
dividual and family living w'age, minimum wage laws. Modification 
of the wage system: labor participation in management, profit- 
sharing and labor stockholding. Strikes, industrial arbitration. La- 
bor Unions of different kinds. International labor legislation. (Al- 
ternative to this course : Economics, 201-202.) 

Six hours credit. 

301. SOCIAL CASE WORK 

The philosophy, methods and processes of social case work; ob- 
servation and understanding of family and individual needs; agen- 
cies created to meet them. The ethical aspects of case work. 

Three hours credit. 

302. SOCIAL HISTORY: SOCIAL ORIGINS 

Early groupings among primitive people. Domestic society. Position 
of woman and the child. Sibs and tribal relationships. Notion of 
property. Slavery. Primitive morality and religion. 

Three hours credit. 

304. SOCIAL HISTORY: HISTORY OF SOCIAL WORK 

Historical antecedents of present-day social work. Greek and Roman 
practice; Hebrew social legislation; Christian concept of charity. 
Medieval charities under ecclesiastical, communal or guild direction. 
The post-Reformation poor-laws. Rise of professional social work. 
Social work of religious orders. 

Two hours credit. 

401. SOCIALISM AND REVOLUTIONARY COMMUNISM 

Historical and literary antecedents of Karl Marx's "Capital". Nature 
and tenets of Marxian Socialism; critique of the same. Historical 
sketch of Bolshevism. Soviet governmental system; internal policy. 
Communist international propaganda and activities. Defensive meas- 
ures. (Recommended supplement to this course: Religion 401.) 

Two hours credit. 

402. SOCIAL ETHICS 

Cf. Philosophy 402— Special Ethics. 

Four hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

403. the family 

Conjugal society, natural: monogamy, polygyny, polyandry. Matri- 
archal and patriarchal families. The evolutionist theory of marriage. 
Divorce: prevalence, causes, consequences, remedies. Birth-control 
and feticide. Social and economic emancipation of woman. The Eu- 
genic Movement. Family disintegration: forces hostile to the family. 
Economic security: family living wage and allowances; mothers' 
pensions. Rights and duties of parents in education; sex-education 
and training to chastity. Parent-teacher co-operation. Industrialism 
and the home: woman in industry. Equal rights amendment; Child 
Labor Amendment. The State and Marriage. 

Three hours credit. 

404. THE STATE AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

Origin of civil society and authority. Theories of Hobbes, Locke, 
Rousseau; the early American theory of the State. The protective 
and promotive functions of the State. Relation of the State to the in- 
dividual and the family. The Liberal, Socialist and Fascist State; 
the Corporative State. State assistance and compulsory social in- 
surance. Necessity of social legislation and of government regula- 
tion of economic activity. Representative government and political 
parties. Plural vote and proportional representation. Principles of 
just taxation: inheritance taxes, income taxes, corporation taxes. 
The State and morals. The natural society of nations; international 
law. Patriotism, Nationalism, Internationalism. Pacificism, true and 
false. Causes of war; conditions of a just war. Measures to insure 
peace. 

Three hours credit. 

405. SOCIAL PROBLEMS: POVERTY AND DEPENDENCY 

Definitions: causes, consequences. Preventive and remedial meas- 
ures. Outdoor and indoor relief. Comparative merits of the dole and 
of work relief. Public and private relief agencies and their co-or- 
dination. Comparative merits of public and private charity and their 
mutual relations. The St. Vincent de Paul Society, and social work 
of religious orders. 

Two hours credit. 

406. SOCIAL PROBLEMS: UNEMPLOYMENT 

Causes: personal, natural, industrial, social. Preventive measures: 
budgeted production, long-range planning of public works by muni- 
cipalities and state and national governments; public labor ex- 
changes. Remedial: Unemployment insurance, private by Labor 
Unions and employers; State-aided and compulsory. 

Two hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

407. social problems: crime and juvenile delinquency 

General conditions of crime in the United States. Analysis and 
evaluation of various schools of criminology. Retribution; repres- 
sion; reformation; prevention. Treatment of the criminal; parole 
and merit system. Necessary legal, judicial and police reforms. The 

juvenile delinquent and the juvenile court. 

Two hours credit. 



Spanish 



•1. ELEMENTARY SPANISH 

Study of the most widely used words in Spanish. Phonetics. Class 
work will consist of dictation, reading and conversation based on 
the day's lesson. Oral drill of auxiliary and regular verbs. 

No college credit. 

*2. ELEMENTARY SPANISH 

Fundamental principles of Spanish grammar, studied and applied 
in dictation, reading and conversation. Irregular verbs completed. 
Considerable outside reading required 

No college credit. 

101. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 

This course will be open to students who have completed courses 1 
and 2, or who present two units of Spanish from high school. Gram- 
mar review, graded reading and composition. 

Three hours credit. 

102. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 

Continuation of preceding course. 

Three hours credit. 

201. ADVANCED SPANISH 

Spanish history. The history of Spain will constitute the introduc- 
tion to Spanish literature. Special attention to religious and political 
influences. Classes conducted in Spanish as far as possible. Outside 
reading required. 

Three hours credit. 

202. ADVANCED SPANISH 

Spanish literature. A continuation of the preceding course, with more 
insistence on literary history. 

Three hours credit. 



"Courses 1 and 2 are required of Spanish students who present less 
than 2 high school units in Spanish, or who are unable to follow 
Spanish 101. 

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Spring Hill College 

301. spanish literature: the classical period 

The masterpieces of the most celebrated writers of the Golden Age 
will be presented in a series of Spanish lectures. Thorough study 
of prose structure and poetic technique, with obligatory written re- 
ports. 

Three hours credit. 

302. SPANISH LITERATURE: CERVANTES 

The entire course will be devoted to the life and works of Cervantes, 
with special emphasis on Don Quijote de la Mancha. A notebook 
kept up-to-date will be the out-of-class assignment. 

Three hours credit. 

401. MODERN PROSE 

This course is intended as a study of the literary and philosophical 
principles of modern Spanish writers. A thorough reading of not less 
than six authors will be required out of class. The class will be con- 
ducted in Spanish. 

Three hours credit. 

402. MODERN POETRY 

A study of the romantic movement in Spain. Reading, analysis and 
appreciation of contemporary poets will be included. 

Three hours credit. 



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Spring Hill College 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

As college education is accomplished not only during the hours of 
class, but also in no small degree during the students' intercourse with 
each other at other periods, the College heartily encourages all student 
organizations which help to develop in the student initiative, self- 
reliance and leadership in organized religious and social movements, 
qualities which are expected of college men generally. 

Extra Curricular Credit 

The College accepts towards graduation 4 credits in extra-curric- 
ular activities, and requires a minimum of one such credit from all 
candidates for a degree. The scale by which such credits are given is 
as follows: 

A) One credit per year: to President of the Student Council, Prefect 

of college Sodality, Editor-in-Chief of Springhillian, and presi- 
dents of various study-clubs; also to members of various musical 
organizations, and members of Inter-collegiate Debating team. 

B) One-half credit per year: to members of all recognized college 
organizations listed in this catalogue, and such officers as are not 
named in (A) above. 

Participation in any activity is contingent upon the rules of the 
particular organization, and subject to the academic standing of the 
student. Thus, upon failure in any subject a student may be asked 
to drop one extra-curricular activity, and in the case of several failures 
will be liable to suspension from all student organizations. 

Spring Hill Student Council 

The Spring Hill Student Council is elected by the student body to 
safeguard the honor and traditions of the College and to promote and 
direct its activities, with the approval of the faculty. 

Officers 

Charles E. Traynor ___________ President 

J. Y. Bordelon ____________ Vice-President 

Alfred Wettermark ___________ Secretary 

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Spring Hill College 

Members 

Jules Houssiere ____________ Senior 

Paul Brunson ____________ Senior 

John R. Henry ________ _ Senior 

Mike Donahue ____________ Junior 

James Borthwick ___________ Junior 

George Wood ____________ Junior 

John Lawrence Lavretta _________ Junior 

Avelin Tacon ____________ Sophomore 

Charles Isaac ____________ Freshman 



Sodality of the Immaculate Conception 

The purpose of this Sodality is to develop Christian character under 
the protection of the Mother of Christ and to cultivate the lay aposto- 
late. The Sodality endeavors to attain this end by conducting weekly 
meetings at which the office of the Blessed Virgin is recited and in- 
structions are given by the Director and by organizing sections for 
the promotion of special activities. 

Officers 

John R. Henry ____________ Prefect 

James Borthwick ___________ Vice-Prefect 

Burke McEllin ____________ Secretary 

Breen Bland _____________ Treasurer 

Members 

Jack Bland Leo Stelly 

J. Y. Bordelon William Rimes 

Warren Bordelon Frank Tally 

William Ching Carey Thompson 

Roger Ching Jack Thompson 

Charles Cochran Charles Traynor 

Frank DeCoursey Buckner Webb 

Richard Dolan Alfred Wettermark 

Victor Geld Charles Wilds 

Richard Flanagan Eugene Sutherland 

Prewitt Grigsby Charles Miller 

Reginald Hatcher Robert Zehnder 

Jules Houssiere George Lillich 

Guy W. Hazel Leonard Looney 

Charles Isaac Olaf Fink 

Edwin Melsheimer William Schonacker 

Charles Lange Frank Wilk 

Charles Phillips David Martin 

William Phelan Joseph Collins 

Tommy Plauche John Pracher 

James Reilly Matthew Thompson 

Thomas Saul Michael Hurley 

Francis Simpson Claude Pasquier 

72 



Spring Hill College 

Afiostleshifi of Prayer — League of the 
Sacred Heart 



This association aims at training its members in the practice of 
prayer and other good works by seeking in them the interests of the 
Sacred Heart of Jesus: "The glory of God and the good of souls." 
Meetings are held once a month. 

Officers 

Rev. Andrew B. Fox, S.J. _________ Moderator 

John R. Henry ____________ Head Promoter 



Saint John Berchmans* Sanctuary Society 

The object of this Society is to contribute to the beauty and solem- 
nity of Divine Worship by the accurate performance of liturgical 
ceremonies. The members are accorded the privilege of serving the 
priests at the altar. 

Officers 

Jack Bland _____________ President 

Charles P. Miller ___________ Vice-President 

Alfred Wettermark ___________ Secretary 

Members 

J. Y. Bordelon Leonard Looney 

Warren Bordelon Claude Pasquier 

Thomas Byrne William Phelan 

Richard Clarke John Pracher 

Richard Flanagan William Rimes 

Reginald Hatcher Harry Roell 

Jules Houssiere Herbert Roney 

Charles Isaac John Shearer 

William Kerr Phil Sheridan 

Raymond Kimble Leo Stelly 

Ed Lambert Robert Zehnder 

73 



Spring Hill College 
The S firing nilh an 

The Springhillian, formerly a quarterly publication, is now pub- 
lished monthly. It is edited by the students under the direction of a 
member of the faculty to encourage self-expression and literary am- 
bition among the students, and to record current events of the College. 

Staff 

Rev. Charles J. Quirk, S.J. ________ Moderator 

John R. Henry -_-_-_______ Editor-in-Chief 

J. Y. Bordelon -______----_ Business Mgr. 

Editorial Staff 

Alfred Wettermark ___________ News Editor 

Marshall Seifert __-_-_-__-_- Special Writer 

Edward Krumeich ___________ Special Writer 

Ferdinand Greifenstein _________ Special Writer 

James B. Reilly ____________ Feature Writer 

Dan C. Walsh ____________ Staff Writer 

Harry Martin ____________ Literary Editor 

Burke McEllin ____________ Staff Writer 

Michael O'Rourke ___________ Staff Writer 

F. E. Busby _____________ Sports Editor 

J. Chas. Cochran ___________ Staff Writer 

Jack Halliday ____________ Staff Writer 

Business Staff 

Harry Boyd _____________ Advertising Mgr. 

Jack Bland _____________ Assistant 

Burke McEllin ____________ Circulation 

Carey Thompson ___________ Assistant 

Charles Wilds ____________ Assistant 

The Social Study Club 

The Social Study Club was organized for the study and discussion 
of social problems. The relation of government to economic problems, 
and the rights and obligations of capital and labor were among the 
subjects discussed at the meetings during the past few months. 

74 



Spring Hill College 
The Portier Debating Academy 

This Society is named in memory of the learned and saintly pre- 
late, the Rt. Rev. Michael Portier, d.d., first Bishop of Mobile, who 
founded the College in 1830. 

Membership is open to all students and is attained by those who 
demonstrate their literary ability to the satisfaction of the Academy. 

The members hold weekly meetings at which they engage in 
literary and forensic exercises. The inter-collegiate Debating Team 
is chosen from this Academy. 

Officers 

Alfred Wettermark __________ President 

James Borthwick ___________ Vice-President 

Frank DeCoursey ___________ Secretary 

Daniel Walsh ____________ Treasurer 

Charles P. Miller ___________ Sergt.-at-Arms 

Members 

Earl Bassett John R. Henry 

Richard Clarke Lamar Jackson 

Joseph Collins Francis O'Rourke 

John Grannis Forrest Pendleton 

Reginald Hatcher William Talbott 

The Yenni Dramatic Society 

The Yenni Dramatic Society is an organization created in 1935 to 
foster a practical interest in the drama. The members meet to dis- 
cuss plays and acting. At least once during the school year they stage 
a play for the public. 

The society is named in honor of Father Dominic Yenni, S.J., who 
taught dramatics at Spring Hill for more than fifty years. 

Officers 

John Lawrence Lavretta ____-._-__ President 

James B. Reilly ____________ Vice-President 

W. Breisten Fulford __________ Sec.-Treas. 

Members 

Samuel Betty C. W. Miller 

William Claiborne Thomas Steely 

Charles Cochran Francis Tally 

Edward Lopez George Wood 
Harry Martin 

75 



Spring Hill College 
The Spring Hill Glee Club 

This organization has for its aim the desire to excel in vocal music. 
Its membership is open to all students who are interested in vocal ex- 
pression. It has one essential requirement, however, and this is at- 
tendance at the practices, which are held twice a week. 

Sfanng HUl College Band 

Officers 

Dr. Edward Victor Cupero ________ Conductor 

George Wood ____________ President 

Paul Deimling ____________ Vice-President 

Marshall Seifert ___________ Secretary 

Charles Isaac ____________ Librarian 



Members 



James Cook 
Paul Deimling 
Victor Geld 
Charles Isaac 
Lamar Jackson 
John L. Lavretta 
Milton Liebeskind 
Thomas Mclntyre 
Albert B. Meriwether 
Wm. Morley 
_$ick Moulyet 
John O'Connell 
Forrest Pendleton 



William Phelan 
Lee Seifert 
Marshall Seifert 
John Shearer 
Phil. Sheridan 
Charles Sigler 
Francis Simpson 
Thomas Steely 
William Stein 
Bob Thibus 
Carey Thompson 
George Wood 



S faring Hill College Orchestra 

Officers 

Lamar Jackson ____________ President 

George Wood ____________ Vice-President 

Marshall Seifert ___________ Secretary 

Charles Isaac ____________ Librarian 



James Cook 
Cecil Chason 
Charles Isaac 
Lamar Jackson 
Ralph Kies 



Members 



Marshall Seifert 
Phil Sheridan 
Carey Thompson 
Raymond Wolf 
George Wood 



76 



Spring Hill College 
Spring Hill Poetry Society 

The purpose of this club is to promote a greater interest in Poetry. 

Officers 

Paul Brunson ____________ President 

Jack Bland _____________ Vice-President 

James Reilly _____________ Sec.-Treas. 

Members 

Burton Browne Harold Martin 

John Henry Francis O'Rourke 

Karl How"ard George Wood 
Burke McEllinn 

The "S" Club 

This club has for its object the promotion of interest in athletics at 
Spring Hill. Membership is limited to those who have been awarded 
the letter S for excellence in any branch of athletics, and who are 
striving to live up to the ideals of true sportsmanship. 

The Alumni Association 

Spring Hill endeavors to keep in touch with its former students, 
and takes pride in their achievements. The College has been greatly 
helped by certain organizations formed by the Alumni in different 
cities for the purpose of fostering the recollections of their college 
days, and working for the interest of their Alma Mater. These are : 

Augusta Spring Hill College Club 
Georgia Club of Spring Hill College 
New Orleans Spring Hill College Club 
Thibodaux Spring Hill College Club 
Montgomery Spring Hill College Club 
Washington Spring Hill College Club 
Chicago Spring Hill College Club 
New York Alumni of Spring Hill College, Inc. 
The St. Louis Chapter of the Alumni Association of 
Spring Hill College. 

77 



Spring Hill College 
The Mendel Club 

The object of this club is to foster interest in biological research 
work. Meetings are held once a week, at which papers are read by in- 
dividual members, dealing with the results of private work. Twice a 
month, some eminent biologist or physician is invited to address the 
club. The club publishes a monthly paper, "The Mendelian," devoted 
to biological subjects. 

Officers 

Milton Liebeskind ___________ President 

Alvin B. Hayles ____________ Vice President 

Ferdinand E. Greifenstein ________ Secretary- 
Alfred Wettermark ___________ Treasurer 



William Chapman 
Mike Donahue, Jr. 
Lamar Jackson 
Edward Krumeich 
Charles Lange 
Claude Pasquier 



Members 



Wm. Phelan 
John Pracher 
Edwin Trigg 
Charles Wilds 
George Wood 



O 



micron 



Sigma 



Officers 

Douglas Grymes ____________ President 

Mike Donahue, Jr. ___________ Vice-President 

John Lavretta ____________ Secretary 

Jules Houssiere ____________ Treasurer 



Members 



Harold Allen 
Paul Brunson 
Francis Busby 
Bobby Herndon 
Lynn Hymel 
Donald Kelly 
Edward Martin 
Edwin Melsheimer 
Charles Phillips 
Tommy Plauche 
John Repoll 
Tom Saul 
Jock Sutherland 
Tom Walsh 
Charles Wilds 
Jack Zieman 
Randolph Bacot 
Sam Betty 



Lewis Brock 
Tom Byrne 
Charles Cochran 
Charles Collins 
Olaf Fink 
Theodore Jones 
Charles Rehm 
Jack Rosier 
Bill Schonacker 
Tommy Sharpe 
Clifford Stults 
Tom Talbot 
John Tarantino 
Billy Walsh 
Frank Wilk 
Charles Winnow 
Donald Wulff 



78 



Spring Hill College 



Phi Omega 

Officers 

J. Y. Bordelon ____________ President 

Steve Bedford ____________ Vice-President 

Warren Bordelon ___________ Treasurer 

Alfred Wettermark ___________ Secretary 

Members 

John Henry Ed Lambert 

Leslie Reeves Charles Bordelon 

Reginald Hatcher Frank Beddow 

Ed Palmes James Borthwick 

Claude Pasquier Cecil Chason 

Forrest Pendleton Frank DeCoursey 

Matthew Thompson Frank Boehm 

William Kerr John Avery Grannis 

Jack Bender Prewitt Grigsby 

E. G. Hernandez G. W. Hazel 

Marion Kent John Lawler 

Harry Roell James Reilly 

Herbert Abdalla Avelin Tacon 

Richard Clarke Jack Thompson 

Charles Isaac Charles Traynor 

Bobby Cunningham Dan Walsh 

Thomas Mclntyre Charles Waller 

Richard Norville Shannon Waller 

Harry Boyd Raymond Kimble 



79 



Spring Hill College 

DEGREES CONFERRED 
1935 

May 28, 1935 

Bachelor of Arts 

■, 

Lanier P. Angle Dayton H. Mudd, Jr. 

cum laude 
Jefferson Bruce Braswell Peter Starks O'Shea 

cum laude 
John Marion Callahan Daniel E. Power, Jr. 

John Crawford Hope, Jr Francis Joseph Skeffington 

Thomas Edward Kerrigan Robert Machel Weinacker, Jr. 

Charles Placide Martin 

cum laude 

Bachelor or Science 

Wallace Eugene Dobyns Eugene Joseph LeCompte 

William Elsevier Jack E. Palmes 

Marshall Wilson Fort Julius M. Sitterle 

cum laude 
Joseph H. Helmsing John Edward Switzer 

cum laude 

Bachelor of Science in Commerce 

Joseph Augustine Crane William Henry Saul, Jr. 

cum laude 
James Joseph Dowds, Jr. Edward Leroy Thompson 

magna cum laude magna cum laude 

Marion L. Powell 

magna cum laude 

Bachelor of Philosophy 
Joseph Thomas Martin, Jr. 

July 20, 1935 

Bachelor of Arts 

Gerald James Griffin Sr. M. Gabriel Slattery, R.S.M. 

Bachelor of Philosophy 

Brother Albert Lents, S.C. Brother Roland Smith, S.C. 

December 11, 1935 

Doctor of Laws (honoris causa) 
Reverend James Meehan, A.B. 

80 



Spring Hill College 

prizes 

1935 

The Joseph Block Memorial Medal to be awarded to the student who 
contributed most to the advancement of Music at Spring Hill Col- 
lege was founded by his children: Edward Block of New York, 
Alexander Block, Mrs. Bettie Haas, Mrs. Emma Eichold, Mrs. 
Fannie B. Simon of Mobile. 

This medal was won by Charles M. J. Moseley. 

The Bishop O'Sullivan Memorial Medal, founded in honor of the 
Most Reverend Jeremiah O'Sullivan, d.d., Bishop of Mobile, for 
excellence in Christian Doctrine and Ecclesiastical History. 

This medal was won by P. Starks O'Shea. 

Next in merit, Burton Browne. 

The Hutchinson Medal, founded by Miller Reese Hutchinson, e.e., 
ph.d., for the best thesis in Philosophy. 

This medal was won by J. Bruce Braswell. 
Next in merit, James Borthwick. 

The Merilh Medal, founded by Edmund L. Merilh, b.s., '17, of New 
Orleans, La., for the best English essay. 

This medal was won by Raymond E. Bernard. 

The Walsh Memorial Medal founded in memory of William A. 
Walsh, a.b., '08, for excellence in Oratory. 
This medal was won by John E. Switzer. 
Next in merit, Frank Skeffington, Donald Wulff. 

The O'Callaghan Medal, donated by Rev. J. McDermott, in memory 
of Rev. C. T. O'Callaghan, d.d., for the best paper in Latin. 
This medal was won by John Lawrence Lavretta, Jr. 
Next in merit, Charles Duffy, John Marion Callahan. 

The Mastin Medal, founded by William M. Mastin, m.d., ll.d., for 
the best paper in General and Organic Chemistry. 
This medal was won by Jules Houssiere. 
Next in merit, J. Bruce Braswell. 

81 



Spring Hill College 

The Stewart Medal, donated by D. M. Stewart, m.d., for the best 
paper in Biology. 

This medal was won by Milton M. Liebeskind. 
Next in merit, Breen Bland, William Ching. 

The Deportment Medal, founded by the Most Reverend Edward P. 
Allen, d.d., for Excellent Deportment, to be awarded by the votes 
of the students, with the approbation of the Faculty. 

This medal was won by P. Starks O'Shea. 
Next in merit, Jack Bland, Charles P. Martin. 

The Matt Rice Service Cup, founded by the Omicron Sigma Chapter 
of Alpha Delta Gamma in memory of Matthew P. Rice, a.b., '19, a 
founder of the local chapter and a loyal Springhillian, to be award- 
ed to the student,who, during the year, has rendered the greatest 
service to the College. 

This cup was awarded to P. Starks O'Shea. 



Spring Hill College 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 
1935-1936 

Regular Session 
Key: 

Course: A, Arts; S, Science; C, Commerce. 
Class: 1, Freshman; 2, Sophomore; 3. Junior; 4, Senior. 



Abdalla, Herbert 


C-l 


Allen, Harold Donald 


S-l 


Allen, Harold Gurganus 


Cc3 


Allen, James Edward, Jr. 


C-l 


Anderson, Frank Hunter 


S-l 


Andrews, Francis 


A-3 


Bacot, Randolph E. 


S-3 


Barry, Gerald 


C-l 


Bassett, Earl C, Jr. 


A-l 


Bean, Robert 


S-2 


Beddow*, Frank P., Jr. 


C-2 


Bedford, Stephen K. 


S-4 


Bell, Thomas D. 


A-3 


Bender, T. J., Jr. 


S-l 


Benefield, Oscar H. 


A-l 


Betty, Samuel Marks 


S-l 


Biggs, Oscar S. 


O-l 


Bland, Breen 


S-3 


Bland, Jack 


S-3 


Boehm, Frank J., Jr. 


S-2 


Bogue, Harry Inge 


S-l 


Bordelon, Charles 


C-2 


Bordelon, J. Y. 


C-4 


Bordelon, Warren 


C-4 


Borthwick, James F., Jr. 


S-3 


Boyd, Harry 


C-4 


Breland, Charles Gregory 


S-l 


Breneman, John Warren 


A-l 


Brin, Maurice Rene, Jr. 


C-l 


Brock, Lewis Ashton 


C-4 


Browne, Burton 


S-3 


Brunson, Paul W. 


A-4 


Bullwinkle, Ernest 


S-2 


Busby, F. Elmer 


C-3 


Byrd, Billie 


C-3 


Byrne, Thomas A. 


A-l 



Canale, John F. 



S-l 



Opelousas, Louisiana 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Union Springs, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 

Summit, Mississippi 
Luzerne, Pennsylvania 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Jacksonville, Florida 
Jefferson City, Missouri 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Spring Hill, Alabama 
Peterman, Alabama 
Memphis, Tennesee 
Memphis, Tennessee 
Kirkwood, Missouri 
Mobile, Alabama 
Opelousas, Louisiana 
Opelousas, Louisiana 
Opelousas, Louisiana 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Dallas, Texas 
Mobile, Alabama 
Memphis, Tennessee 
Spring Hill, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Chicago, Illinois 

Memphis, Tennessee 



83 



Spring Hill College 



Cazalas, Conrad 
Chapman, William Henry 
Chason, Cecil G. 
Ching, Roger 
Ching, William 
Claiborne, William Cole 
Clarke, Richard J. 
Cochran, James Charles 
Coggin, Gerald 
Collins, Joseph John 
Cook, James W. 
Craddock, S. Harris 
Crane, John Francis 
Crittenden, James Richard 
Cunningham, Robert 
Curley, Curtis 

Daves, Alfred C. 
Davis, Joseph Oglevee 
DeCoursey, Frank 
Deimling, Paul Lewis 
Demeranville, Hardy A., Jr. 
Demouy, Max Lee 
Dewey, Charles 
Dolan, Charles C. 
Dolan, Richard Joseph 
Donahue, Mike, Jr. 
Dreisbach, Henry 
Dreisbach, Joseph 
Dunn, James Thomas 
Duval, Philip 

Elsevier, Adolph 
Epperson, Joel Vaughn 
Erwin, James H. 
Evans, Edwin D. 



C-l 


Crichton, Alabama 


S-2 


Tennille, Georgia. 


A-2 


Yarbo, Alabama 


S-4 


Memphis, Tennessee 


S-4 


Memphis, Tennessee 


A-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-l 


Owensboro, Kentucky 


A-l 


Natchez, Mississippi 


C-l 


Crichton, Alabama 


C-l 


Forney, Texas 


S-3 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-l 


Lake Charles, Louisiana 


C-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


C-3 


Mobile, Alabama 


A-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


Crl 


Nashville, Tennessee 


S-l 


Irvington, Alabama 


S-l 


Laurel, Mississippi 


A-3 


Kansas City, Kansas 


S-2 


Greenville, South Carolina 


A-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


C-2 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


C-2 


Savannah, Georgia 


S-3 


Spring Hill, Alabama 


S-l 


Nashville, Tennessee 


Crl 


Nashville, Tennessee 


C-l 


Spring Hill, Alabama 


C-3 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-l 


Mobile, Alabama 



Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 



Farnell, William R. C-3 

Ferrell, D. Keith S-l 

Fink, Olaf C-l 

Flanagan, Richard M. A-l 

Flanagan, William P. A-3 

Fleming, Martin A. C-l 

Flynn, Michael J. A-3 

Fulford, Wm. Breisten S-4 



Mobile, Alabama 
Mt. Pleasant, Alabama 
New Orleans, Louisiana 
Bangor, Maine 
Bangor, Maine 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 
Pratt City, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 



Geer, Vasco R., Jr. 



Mobile, Alabama 



84 





Spring Hill 


Geld, Victor 




C-2 


Goodman, Wm. James, 


Jr 


A-l 


Grannis, John Avery, 


Jr. 


C-2 


Greifenstein, Ferdinand E. 


S-3 


Grigsby, B. Prewitt 




S-2 


Grymes, Douglas 




A-4 


Guchereau, Charles M. 




C-2 


Guhman, Jerome C. 




C-l 


Guillot, Lawrence E. 




C-l 


Halladay, Jack Thomas 


A-l 


Hamilton, Joseph L. 




S-l 


Hardesty, John R. 




C-2 


Harold, Ralph Andrew 




C-l 


Hatcher, Reginald W., 


Jr. 


C-4 


Hayles, Alvin B. 




S-3 


Hazel, G. W., Jr. 




C-2 


Heblon, Erwin E. 




A-l 


Heile, Francis 




S-l 


Hemphill, Dudley E. 




S-l 


Hsnry, John R. 




A-4 


Hernandez, Ernest G., 


Jr. 


A-l 


Herndon, Robin C, Jr. 




C-3 


Hightower, John R. 




S-l 


Hill, Bert 




S-l 


Holmes, William R. 




S-2 


Houssiere, Jules A. 




S-4 


Howard, Karl N. 




A-2 


Hunley, Charles 




S-2 


Hurley, Michael 




A-2 


Hyland, Norman D. 




S-2 


Hymel, Lynn 




C-3 



College 



Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 
Mobile, Alabama 
Nashville, Tennessee 
Newark, NeW Jersey 
Bardstown, Kentucky 
Memphis, Tennessee 
Vicksburg, Mississippi 
St. Louis Missouri 
Dallas, Texas 

Whistler, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Jacksonville, Florida 
Toulminville, Alabama 
Milledgeville, Georgia 
Mobile, Alabama 
Philpot, Kentucky 
Mobile, Alabama 
Ft. Mitchell ,Kentucky 
Mobile, Alabama 
Columbus, Mississippi 
Pensacola, Florida 
Mobile, Alabama 
Crichton, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Jennings, Louisiana 
Mobile, Alabama 
Theodore, Alabama 
Chicago, Illinois 
Mobile, Alabama 
Central, Louisiana 



Isaac, Charles 



A-l 



Montgomery, Alabama 



Jackson, James Lamar 


S-l 


Jones, Theodore B. 


C-l 


Jordan, Joseph L. 


S-3 


Karl, Erhard C, Jr. 


C-2 


Keating, Thomas A. 


C-2 


Kelly, Donald 


C-3 


Kelly Raymond 


C-l 


Kemp, William 


S-2 


Kent, Marion 


C-l 


Kerr, William Joseph 


A-2 


Kies, Ralph 


A-l 



Mobile, Alabama 
Whistler, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 

Mobile, Alabama 
Hamilton, Ohio 
Mobile, Alabama 
Chicago, Illinois 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Winnetka, Illinois 
Corpus Christi, Texas 



85 



Spring Hill College 



Kilday, Euclid Lloyd 
Kimble, Raymond V., Jr. 
Kroner, Frederick M., Jr. 
Krumeich, Edward E., Jr. 

LaCoste, Elmer W. 
Lambert, Edward 
Lambert, Herbert 
Landry, Alphonse C. 
Lange, Charles E. 
Lavretta, John L., Jr. 
Lawler, John C, Jr. 
Lawley, Eugene 
Libbey, Harry Gilbert, Jr. 
Liebeskind, Milton M. 
Lillich, George T. 
Looney, Leonard 
Lopez, Edward 
Lord, Charles 

McConaghy, Charles L. 
McCowan, Edwin T. 
McEllin, Burke 
Mclntyre, Tommie 
McKenzie, Fraser B., Jr. 
McKinley, John M. 
McLemore, James T. 
McVay, Woodie L., Jr. 
Maisel, Harold 
Maner, A. H. 
March, George M, 
Martin, David 
Martin, Edward 
Martin, Harold P. 
Mayeux, Lance 
Melsheimer, Edwin 
Meriwether, Albert B. 
Miller, Bertrand A., Jr. 
Miller, Chas. Preston 
Miller, C. W. 
Minondo, Manuel 
Montes de Oca, Ernesto 
Montes de Oca, Ignatio 
Montes de Oca, Ricardo 
Moore, James Edward 
Moore, Michael 
Morehead, Ernest L., Jr. 



C-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-3 


Helena, Arkansas 


C-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


A-2 


Akron, Ohio 


Crl 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-l 


Natchez, Mississippi 


C-l 


Monroeville, Alabama 


Crl 


Lafayette, Louisiana 


S-2 


Galveston, Texas 


A-3 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-2 


Toulminville, Alabama 


C-3 


Chunchula, Alabama 


S-l 


Spring Hill, Alabama 


S-3 


Newark, New Jersey 


A-l 


Rochester, New York 


S-l 


Shreveport, Louisiana 


C-l 


New York, New York 


C-l 


Crichton, Alabama 


S-2 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-2 


Mobile, Alabama 


A-2 


Savannah, Georgia 


Crl 


Columbus, Mississippi 


S-2 


Chickasaw, Alabama 


C-l 


Atmore, Alabama 


S-3 


Mobile, Alabama 


A-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


C-l 


Belfast, Maine 


A-3 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-l 


Mobile, Alabama. 


C-l 


Lafayette, Louisiana 


C^2 


Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 


A-2 


Mobile, Alabama 


C-2 


Lafayette, Louisiana 


C-2 


Vicksburg, Mississippi 


S-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


C-4 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-2 


Memphis, Tennessee 


S-3 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-2 


Guayama, Puerto Rico 


A-l 


Guanajuato, Mexico 


A-l 


Guanajuato, Mexico 


A-l 


Guanajuato,. Mexico 


A-l 


Orchard, Alabama 


S-2 


Orchard, Alabama 


S-l 


Mobile, Alabama 



86 



Spring Hill College 



Morley, William James 


S-l 


Moulyet, Nick 


S-l 


Nelson, Arthur Ray 


S-l 


Norville, Richard 


S-l 


O'Connell, John 0. 


S-l 


Oliver, Marshall 


S-3 


O'Rourke, Gregory Stockman 


A-l 


O'Rourke, Michael Francis 


A-4 


Ousley, Arthur Thomas 


S-l 


Palmes, Edward 


s-2 


Partridge, William T. 


C-2 


Pasquier, Claude M. 


S-l 


Pendleton, Forrest, Jr. 


A-l 


Peters, Phillip Frank, Jr. 


C-l 


Phelan, William P., f Jr. 


S-2 


Phillips, Chas. W. 


A-2 


Pilkington, Albert J. 


S-3 


Pipes, Robert Ford 


S-l 


Plauche, Thomas J. 


C-l 


Powell, Wm. Edward, Jr. 


C-l 


Pracher, John Robert 


S-l 



Michigan City, Indiana 
Prichard, Alabama 

Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 

Dallas, Texas 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 

Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Shreveport, Louisiana 
New Orleans, Louisiana 
Mobile, Alabama 
Key West Florida 
Chicago, Illinois 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Lake Charles, Louisiana 
Carson, Alabama 
Monroe, Louisiana 



Quackenbush, Henry 



C-l 



Mobile, Alabama 



Reed, Heyward 


C-l 


Reeves, Leslie 


S-4 


Regil, Alvaro de 


A-l 


Rehm, Charles Lawrence 


S-l 


Rehm, Edward F. 


A-l 


Reilly, James B. 


A-3 


Repoll, John A., Jr. 


C-4 


Rimes, Wm. John 


A-l 


Roell, Harry H. 


C-l 


Rogers, James Yates 


S-l 


Roney, Herbert J. 


C-4 


Rosier, John Curtis 


C-l 


Ruesga, Vincent R. 


C-l 


Saul, Thomas L. 


C-4 


Schonacher, Wm. Alfred 


Crl 


Seifert, Lee Roe 


C-2 


Seifert, Marshall E. 


A-4 


Sharp, Thomas E., Jr. 


C-l 


Shearer, John Ligon 


S-3 


Sheridan, Phil 


C-l 



Mobile, Alabama 
Bogalusa, Louisiana 
Merida, Yucatan, Mexico 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Thomasville, Georgia 
Mobile, Alabama 
Monroe, Louisiana 
Jackson, Mississippi 
Chickasaw, Alabama 
Chicago, Illinois 
Dallas, Texas 
Tampa, Florida 

Augusta, Georgia 
New Orleans, Louisiana 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Spring Hill, Alabama 
Raymond, Mississippi 
Macon, Georgia 



87 



Spring Hill College 



Shofner, Edward 
Sigler, Charles W., Jr. 
Simpson, Francis H. 
Slaughter, Carl 
Spafford, Ralph Bruce 
Stanard, W. Douglas 
Steely, Thomas A., Jr. 
Stein, Wm. Albert 
Stely, Leo Allen 
Stults, Clifford E. 
Sutherland, Eugene Charles 
Sweeney, Thomas P. 

Tacon, Avelin P., Jr. 
Talbot, Thomas L. 
Talbott, Wm. Roney 
Tally, Francis Hall 
Tarantino, John J. 
Thibus, Robert M. 
Thompson, John B., Jr. 
Thompson, Matthew* 
Thompson, M. Carey, Jr., 
Tidw'ell, Arthur F. 
Tray nor, Charles E., Jr. 
Trigg, Edwin McKeon 
Trimble, Jack W. 
Turner, Ben D., Jr. 



C-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-3 


Spring Hill, Alabama 


S-3 


Meridian, Mississippi 


S-2 


Tensaw, Alabama 


S-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


C-2 


Mobile, Alabama 


A-2 


Mobile, Alabama 


C-l 


Spring Hill, Alabama 


S-l 


Sulphur, Louisiana 


A-3 


Savannah, Georgia 


C-3 


LaGrange, Georgia 


A-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


Cr2 


Mobile, Alabama 


S-l 


Napoleonville, Louisiana 


S-2 


Lebanon, Kentucky 


A-l 


Pensacola, Florida 


C-3 


Savannah, Georgia 


A-l 


Independence, Kansas 


C-3 


Savannah, Georgia* 


S-l 


Ponce, Puerto Rico 


A-3 


Monroe, Louisiana 


C-l 


Peterman, Alabama 


A-4 


Savannah, Georgia 


S-l 


St. Louis, Missouri 


C-l 


Mobile, Alabama 


A-2 


Spring Hill, Alabama 



Unzicker, John A. 



S-l 



Satsuma, Alabama 



Varnado, Harry Milton 


C-l 


Voorhies, Pothier Jean, Jr. 


C-l 


Walker, David 


C-l 


Waller, Charles L., Jr. 


C-4 


Waller, Shannon E. 


C-3 


Walsh, Daniel Carroll 


S-3 


Walsh, Thomas D. 


S-3 


Walsh, William D. 


S-l 


Weaver, Homer A. 


S-l 


Webb, Buckner G. 


C-4 


Wettermark, Alfred Boyce 


S-4 


Wilds, Charles E., Jr. 


A-2 


Wilk, Frank A. 


C-l 


Willey, Herbert B. 


C-l 


Wilson Louie Francis 


C-3 


V • 


85 



Mobile, Alabama 
Lafayette, Louisiana 

Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Bogalusa, Louisiana 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 
Fowl River, Alabama 
Demopolis, Alabama 
Alexandria, Louisiana 
Monroe, Louisiana 
Nashville, Tennessee 
Mobile, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 



Spring Hill College 



Winnow, Charles Urban 


A-l 


Wolf, Raymond 


C-l 


Wood, George F. 


S-3 


Woods, John Stephen 


S-l 


Wulff, Donald E. 


C-4 


Zehnder, Robert J. 


S-l 


Zieman, John A. 


A-4 



Mobile, Alabama 
Savannah, Georgia 
Chatam, Alabama 
Montgomery, Alabama 
Semmes, Alabama 

Sheffield, Alabama 
Mobile, Alabama 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 
(Regular Session) 

By Classes: Freshmen, 133; Sophomores, 52; Juniors, 48; Seniors, 26. 
Total: 259. 

By Divisions: Arts, 58; Science, 104; Commerce, 97. 



By States: 












Alabama 


146 


Louisiana 


23 


Pennsylvania 


2 


Arkansas 


1 


Maine 


3 


South Carolina 


1 


Florida 


6 


Mississippi 


12 


Tennessee 


14 


Georgia 


13 


Missouri 


4 


Texas 


7 


Illinois 


6 


New Jersey 


2 






Indiana 


1 


New York 


2 


Foreign Countries: 




Kansas 


2 


Ohio 


2 


Mexico 


4 


Kentucky 


5 


Oklahoma 


1 


Puerto Rico 


2 



Part Time Students 



Andrews, Eulalie 
Armsden, Marta 
Austin, Helen 
Bagwell, Mary Nan 
Barnes, Margaret E. 
Bedford, Stephen K. 
Bell, Elva Jenia 
Bogue, Loretta 
Bogue, Sr. Teresa Agnes 
Bolen, Janice 
Bosso, Janis 
Bowab, Gladys 
Bowab, Madeline 
Boyd, Sr. Anne Madeleine 
Boyette, Mabel 
Brandon, Grace 
Brashear, Bro. Firmin 
Brey, Sr. Mary Romana 



Brinkley, Hazel 

Brooks, Clyde 

Busby, Pearl S. 

Byrne, Pat, Mrs. 

Cady, Sr. M. Alberta 

Cain, Louveta 

Calhoun, Miriam 

Carr, Sr. Mary Elizabeth 

Carter, Jessie 

Cashin, Sr. Genevieve 

Cassidy, Anita 

Chaffin, Sr. Mary Clotilde 

Chambers, Josephine Y. 

Chambers, Sr. Mary Stanislaus 

Chassaignac, Bro. Carol 

Ching, Ellen 

Clarke, Florence 

Coen, Sr. Mary Cecelia 



89 



Spring Hill College 



Coggins, Katherine 

Coleman, Sr. Anita 

Cometti, Adele 

Connick, Margaret 

Crane, Anne 

Cranford, Bertha 

Crocker, Mary R. 

Cullum, Sr. Agnes Stanislaus 

Cummins, Sr. Mary Dorothy 

Currie, Hettie Louise 

Dalton, Sr. Margaret Denise 

Deakle, Etta 

DeVan, Katherine C. 

Diamond, Gladys Waller 

D'Olive, Cassie 

D'Olive, Evie L. 

Doody, E. C. 

Doody, Sr. Mary Bernadette 

Dooley, Helen A. 

Doran, Sr. Mary Paulina 

Dorn, Martha 

Dougherty, Sr. Dolorita Marie 

Downey, Bro. Berchmans 

Draper, Thelma Alice 

Druhan, Sr. Mary Regis 

Dubrock, Margaret 

Duke, Inez 

Dyas, Alice 

Edge, Kethie 

Edington, Andrew 

Fabre, Imie 

Fanane, Katherine 

Farnell, Alma 

Feehan, Beulah Delma 

Felterman, Luella. 

Finch, Sr. Aloysia Marie 

FitzWilliams, Sr. Mary Laurentia 

Flinn, Harriet 

Flock, Mary Margaret 

Floyd, Grace 

Forehand, Ruth 

Fowler, Alice Anne 

Friedhoff, Eleanor 

Furr, Rose Emily 

Gallagher, Sr. Georgia Marie 

Gerhardt, Rose 

Gilbert, William J. 

Gill, May 

Girby, Helen 

Green, Elizabeth 

Greifenstein, Ferdinand 

Griffin, Sr. Andrea 

Guice, Ouida 

Haertel, Arthur C. 

Hails, Sr. Louise de Sales 

Harris, Emma C. 

Haselmaier, Kathleen 

Hastings, Sr. Isabel 

Havens, Beatrice 



Hayes, Lola Mae 
Heim, Araminta H. 
Herman, Mrs. J. L., Jr. 
Hillman. Leila 
Hogan, Sr. Mary Innocentia 
Holbrook, H. Shelby 
Holmes, William 
Hughes, Sr. Margaret Mary 
Hunt, Sr. Mary Benigna 
Hyde, Mary Catherine 
Janett, C. R. 
Jane, Elsie 
Jarvis, Genevieve 
Jetmundsen, Petrina 
Johns, Ruby 
Johnson, Mrs. E. J. 
Judge, Nellie 
Kane, Sr. Mary Karmen 
Kastner, Marie 
Kohn, Sr. Mary Theresa 
Kowaleski, Helen 
Krause, Roy 
LaCoste, Elmer 
Ladnier, Ora Lee 
Lambert, Sr. Gertrude 
Lambert, Sr. Mechtildes 
Lamkin, Juliette 
Lange, Charles 
Lanigan, Joseph N. 
Lanicek, Gertrude 
Laubenthal, Ruth 
Lennon, Sr. Mary Celine 
Leslie, Lois 
Libbey, Mary 
Libbey, Virginia 
Liebeskind, Milton 
Lining, Catherine 
Lorio, Bro Simeon 
McAleer, Mary Elizabeth 
McCain, Mary Aleen 
McCord, J. Augusta 
McCown, Helen 
McCreary, Nan 
McCurtin, Sr. Augustine 
McDavid, Elna 
McDavid, Mary Lee 
McDermott, Mary Patricia 
McElroy, Sr. Mary Angela 
McGehee, Atha 
Mcllwain, Margaret 
McLendon, Clydis D. 
McLeod, Emily Matilda 
McMullen, Hazel 
McWhorter, Fannielu 
Mackey, Mildred Adelia 
Mallory, Irene 
Mann, Virginia 
Marx, Melanie G. 



90 



Spring Hill College 



Mason, Cornelia 

Mayers, Elizabeth 

Mayhall, Clara 

Merifield, Opal 

Mills, Liba 

Moore, Tallulah 

Morgan, Mary Leona. 

Moss, Ora B. 

Noel, Dorothy 

O'Connor, Sr. Gerald Marie 

O'Hanlon, Sr. Mary of Mercy 

Oliver, Marshall 

Olsen, Marie 

O'Meara, Sr. Mary Naomi 

d'Ornellas, Marguerite 

O'Rourke, Bro. Thomas 

Pape, Mary 

Parnelle, Bessie 

Penny Elizabeth 

Perry, Ruth Aleen 

Pistole, Lillian 

Pope, Porter 

Porter, Abbie 

Powell, Marguerite 

Pratt, Margaret 

Pullen, Bertha 

Reaves, Clara 

Ricker, Sr. Mary Inez 

Robinson, Sr. Mary Brendan 

Roe, Sr. Mary Cornelia 

Rolls, Eloise McDavid 

Russell, Sallie 

Schettler, Edward L. 

Scott, Helen 

Segrest, Ida Ruth 

Seifert, Marshall 

Sharke, Bro. Aloysius 

Shaughnessy, Sr. Kevin 

Shaw, Ruth 

Shea, Sr. Mary Agnita 

Sheehan, Sr. Mary Bernard 

Sheffield, Constance Inez 

Shuman, Mildred 

Skipworth, Sylvia 

Smith, Earle 



Smith, Leah 

Smith, Marguerite 

Sneider, Fannie 

Snodgrass, Doris 

Spafford, Mrs. B. A. 

Spies, Sr. Bertha 

Spottswood, Joseph Sands 

Steiner, Norma M. 

Steiner, Rosalie Victoria 

Strachan, Abbie 

Strength, Olene 

Stringer, Claudia 

Terrell, Mary F. 

Thompson, Wm. R. 

Tierney, Sr. Teresa Agnes 

Turner, Avon 

Turner, Hazel 

Tyson, Sr. Genevieve 

Vaughan, Lillian A. 

Vaughan, Mrs. Chas. B. 

Waller, Vivienne 

Walsh, Genevieve 

Walsh, Sr. Mary Vincent 

Walsh, Mimi M. 

Walters, Ethel A. 

Walters, Miriam 

Webb, Alice 

West, Edith 

Wettermark, Alfred Boyce 

Whalen, Sr. Anne Berenice 

Wheeler, S. Florence 

Whelan, Sr. Margaret de Sales 

White, Annie Lou 

White, Sr. Rosanna 

Wiatt, Francis C. 

Williams, Mary Lelia 

Williamson, Addie 

Williamson, Agnes V. 

Wilson, Bro. Fidelis 

Wing, John Thomas 

Wood, Vera Bell 

Yeend, Catherine R. 

Yeend, Fidelis 

Yniestra, Gwendolyn 

Yousko, Mildred 



Summer School 1935 



Allen, William P., S.J. 
Benanti, Carmine, S.J. 
Betty, Ellen 
Betty, Samuel 
Bogue, Loretta 
Bogue, Sister M. Teresa 
Brislan, Billie 
Brislan, Jack 



Brown, Sister M. Monica 
Bulla, Brother Allen 
Burns, Robert E., S.J. 
Burns, Sister M. Agnes 
Busby, F. E. 
Agnes Cady, Sister M. Alberta 
Cahill, Sister M. Isadore 
Carpenter, Margaret 



91 



Spring Hill College 



Carr, Sister M. Elizabeth 
Chaffin, Sister M. Clotilde 
Coleman, Sister M. Anita 
Cosgrove, Brother Matthew 
Costello, Brother Wilbert 
Cow'les, George 
Crandell, A. William, S.J. 
Crilly, Sister M. Marcella 
Crowley, Sister M. Edwina 
Daly, Sister M. Cecelia 
Davis, Brother Marius 
Davis, Sister M. Catherine 
Dickson, Brother Boris 
Dolan, George 
Donaldson, Sister M. Aidan 
Donahue, Mike 
Donivan, Sister M. Aloysius 
Douglas, Ruth 
Downing, Joseph 
Druhan, Sister M. Regis 
Falgoust, Brother David 
Falgoust, Brother Ephrem 
Felix, Walter J., S.J. 
Feltz, Sister M. Lawrentia 
Finnegan, Brother Benet 
Forehand, Ruth 
Foster, G. W. 
Fowler, Alice 
Fuss, John, S.J. 
Gibbins, Brother Julian 
Goode, Joyce 
Goodman, William 
Grayson, J. W. 
Griffin, Gerald 
Griffin, Sister M. Andrea 
Halpin, Sister M. Ambrose 
Harbin, James R. 
Harris, Emma C. 
Havens, Annie 
Herm, Sister M. Vincentia 
Hogan, Sister M. Innocentia 
Huber, Sister M. Teresa 
Hunt, Sister M. Benigna 
Jarvis, Genevieve 
Johnson, Mrs. E. J. 
Jordan, Joe 
Kaach, Sister Annette 
Kersting, Aileen 
Kersting, Margaret 
Krassin, Annie E. 
Leanman, Brother Bernadine 
Lennon, Sister M. Celine 



Levell, Raymond P., S.J. 

Libbey, Virginia 

Lents, Brother Albert 

Long, Sister M. Magdeline 

Lynch, Brother Urban 

McClure, Nathaniel 

McDermott, Sister M. James 

McLaughlin, Brother Howard 

Malloy, Joseph W., S.J. 

Malone, Sister M. Angela 

Mangin, Brother Giles 

Marx, Melanie 

Mayeux, Lance 

Morris, Elizabeth 

Moylan, Sister Genevieve 

Nolan, Sister M. Helena 

O'Hanlon, Sister Mary of Mercy 

O'Hara, Brother Edmund 

Oliver, Marshall 

d'Ornellas, Margaret 

d'Ornellas, Virginia 

O'Rourke, Pauline 

Redmond, Sister M. Borgia 

Regil, Alvaro de 

Richart, Sister M. Genevieve 

Rine, Brother Sidney 

Roe, Sister M. Cornelia 

Roe, Sister M. Vincent 

Ryan, Sister M. Patricia 

Scarabin, Sister M. Doloretta 

Schwing, John C, S.J. 

Shaw, Sister M. Wilhemina 

Sheehan, Sister M. Bernard 

Slattery, Sister M. Gabrielle 

Smith, Brother Roland 

Smith, Marguerite 

Smith, Mildred 

Spies, Sister M. Bertha 

Steely, Thomas 

Strachan, Abbie 

Swan, Sister M. Placida 

Thornton, Brother Mark 

Truex, Brother Alton 

Turner, Hazel 

Waller, Charles 

Walsh, William 

Wilson, John 

Whalen, Sister M. Juliana 

Yeend, Catherine 

Yeend, Fidelis 

Yousko, Mildred 

Zinken, Brother Roger 



92 



Spring Hill College 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 
June 1, 1935 to June 1, 1936 

Students : 

Regular Session _________ 259 

Part-time ____________ 242 

Summer School 1935 ________ 120 

Total Gross Enrollment ________ 521 

Less duplication _________ 49 

Total Net Enrollment ________ 472 



93 



Spring Hill College 

Jesuit Colleges and Universities of tke 
United States 

(Seminaries and High Schools are not included in this list.) 

Alabama ______ Spring Hill College, Spring Hill 

California _ _ _ _ _ Loyola College, Los Angeles 

California _ _ _ _ Santa Clara University, Santa Clara 

California ______ Uni. of San Francisco, San Francisco 

Colorado ______ Regis College, Denver 

District of Columbia _ _ Georgetown University, Washington 

Illinois _______ Loyola University, Chicago 

Louisiana ______ Loyola University, New Orleans 

Maryland ______ Loyola College, Baltimore 

Massachusetts _ _ _ _ Boston College, Boston 

Massachusetts _ _ _ _ Holy Cross College, Worcester 

Michigan ______ University of Detroit, Detroit 

Missouri ______ Rockhurst College, Kansas City 

Missouri ______ Saint Louis University, St. Louis 

Nebraska ______ The Creighton University, Omaha 

New Jersey _____ St. Peter's College, Jersey City 

New York ______ Canisius College, Buffalo 

New York ______ Fordham University, Fordham, N. Y. 

Ohio _______ John Carroll University, Cleveland 

Ohio _______ St. John's College, Toledo 

Ohio _______ The Xavier University, Cincinnati 

Pennsylvania _____ St. Joseph's College, Philadelphia 

Washington _____ Bellarmine College, Tacoma 

Washington _____ Gonzaga University, Spokane 

Washington _____ Seattle College, Seattle 

Wisconsin ______ Marquette University, Milwaukee 

In 1934, 24,000 Jesuits, as part of their educational and religious 
work, are maintaining and directing a. chain of schools that encircles 
the globe. 

94 



Spring Hill College 



Ind 



ex 



A.B. curriculum, 22-23 
Academic regulations, 35 
Accounting, 42-44 
Administration, 5 
Admission, 19-21 
Advanced Standing, 21 
Alumni, 77 

Apostleship of Prayer, 72 
Art, 39 
Attendance, 19 

Band, 76 

Biology, 40-41 

Board of Governors, 4 

B.S., 24-26 

B.S.C.,27 

Buildings, 11 

Business Administration, 44-45 

Calendar, 3 
Certificates, 31 
Chemistry, 41-42 
Commerce, 42 
Courses, 39 
Credentials, 20 

Debating, 75 
Degrees, 21, 22, 80 
Discipline, 14 
Dramatics, 75 
Drawing, 46-47 

Education, 47-49 
Electives, 33 
Engineering, 28 
English, 49-52 
Enrollment, 89, 93 
Examinations, 36-37 
Expenses, 16-17 
Extra-curricular credit, 71 
Faculty, 6-9 
Fees, (16-17 
Fraternities, 78-79 
French, 52-53 



General Information, 10 
German, 53 
Glee Club, 76 
Graduation, 32 
Greek, 53-54 

Historical sketch, 10 
History, 54-56 
Honors, 33 

Jesuit Colleges, 94 

Latin, 56 

Majors, etc., 33 
Mathematics, 57-59 
Mendel Club, 78 

Objectives, 13-14, 21 
Orchestra, 76 

Part-time courses, 38, 89 

Ph.B., 23 

Philosophy, 59-61 

Physical education, 61 

Physics, 62-63 

Poetry* Society, 77 

Political Science, 63-64 

Pre-dental, 29 

Pre-legal, 28 

Pre-medical, 29-30 

Pre-professional courses, 27, ff. 

Prizes, 81-82 

Promotion, 37 

Psychology, 64 

Public Speaking, 64-65 

Quality Points, 32 



Register of Students, 83, 
Religion, 65-66, 
Religious life, 15 
Reports, 37 
Required subjects, 34 



ff. 



95 



Spring Hill College 

Sanctuary society, 73 Springhillian, 74 

Scholarship, 37 Student Council, 71 

Scholastic standing, 13 Student Organizations, 71, ff. 

Situation, 11 

Social Study Club, 74 Teacher Training, 31 

Sociology, 66-69 Transcripts, 38 

Sodality, 72 Treasurer's regulations, 17 

Spanish, 69-70 



96 



The Annual 

Catalogue 



of 



;> 



Spring Hill College 

For the Academic Year of 

1936-1937 

With Announcements for the Year of 

1937-1938 




Spring Hill (Mobile County) 
Alabama 

April,! 93 7 



1936 


V " -'"■ — - 

.93 7 


1938 


rsb SEPTEMBER 
, S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


MAY 

S M T W T F S 

1 


JANUARY 
S M T W T F S 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


2 3 4 "5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


OCTOBER 
S M T W T F S 
-12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


JUNE 

5 M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 


FEBRUARY 

5 M T W T F S 
1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 2 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 _ _ _ _ 




NOVEMBER 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


JULY 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


MARCH 

5 M T W T F S 
1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


DECEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 
1 2 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


AUGUST 
S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


APRIL 
S M T W T F S 
12 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


1937 


JANUARY 
S M T W T F S 
_ 1 2 


SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


FEBRUARY 
S M T W T F S 
— 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 


OCTOBER 
S M T W T F S 

,12 


JUNE 
S M T W T F. 3 
12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


i 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


MARCH 

S M T W T F S 
— 1 2 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


NOVEMBER 
S M T W T F S 

__ 12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


JULY 
S M T W T F. S 
12 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


APRIL 
S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 __ 


DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 __ 


AUGUST 
S M T W T F S 
__ 1 2 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 
1937-1938 



1937 



Sept. 14 — Registration. 

Sept. IS — First classes of the session. 

Sept. 21 — Fine for late registration. 

Sept. 25 — Last day for conditioned examinations of previous 

semester. 
Sept. 28— Mass of the Holy Ghost. 
Nov. 1 — Feast of All Saints. Holiday. 

Nov. 11 — Armistice Day. Holiday. 

Nov. 12 — Annual Requiem Mass for deceased faculty and 

students. 
Nov. 25-26 — Thanksgiving Holidays. 

Dec. 8 — Feast of the Immaculation Conception. Holiday. 

Dec. 10 — Freshman Dance. 

Dec. 22 — Christmas Holidays begin after 10 o'clock classes. 

1938 

Jan. 3 — All classes resume. 

Jan. 24 — Semester Examinations. Registration for second sem- 

ester begins. 

Feb. 1 — Second semester begins. 

Feb. 7 — Fine for late registration. Senior syllabi and theses 

recorded. 

Feb. 12 — Conditional examinations for first semester. 

Feb. 28-Mar. 1-Shrovetide Holidays. 

March 8 — Annual Retreat begins. 

March 19 — Feast of St. Joseph, Patron of the College. 

April 1 — Senior Theses due. 

April 13 — Easter recess begins. 

April 19 — All classes resume. 

May 2 — Medal essays due. 

May 26 — Ascension Thursday. Holiday. 

May 29 — Baccalaureate Sunday. 

May 31 — Commencement Exercises. 

June 3 — Second semester ends. 



Trustees of the Corporation 

Very Rev. John J. Druhan, s.j., Chairman 
Rev. Theodore A. Ray, s.j., Secretary 

Rev. John V. Deignan, s.j. 

Rev. Joseph B. Francichauser, s.j. 

Rev. Andrew C. Smith, s.j. 

Corporate title: The President and Trustees of the Spring Hill 

College, in the County of Mobile, Alabama 

Board of Governors of the Spring Hill 
College Foundation 

This board, organized in 1931, is responsible for the supervision and 
administration of the endowment fund of the College. 

Very Rev. John J. Druhan, s.j., Chairman 

Rev. George McHardy, s.j. 

Thomas M. Stevens, ll.b. 

J. M. Walsh 

Matthias M. Mahorner, a.m., ll.b., ll.d. 

David E. Dunlap 

Rev. Joseph M. Walsh, s.j. 



Administrative Officers of the College 

1936-1937 

Very Rev. John J. Druhan, s.j., President 

Rev. Andrew C. Smith, s.j., Dean and Prefect of Studies 

Rev. Warren J. Barker, s.j., Prefect of Discipline (to Feb. 2, 1937) 

Rev. John W. Hynes, s.j., Prefect of Discipline (Feb., 1937-) 

Rev. David R. Lorig, s.j., Student Counsellor 

Rev. Theodore A. Ray, s.j., Treasurer, Superintendent of Buildings 

Rev. George G. McHardy, s.j., Business Manager 

Louis J. Boudousquie, m.s., Registrar 

Marie Yvonne Jaubert, a.b., m.a., b.l.s., Librarian 

Norborne R. Clarke, jr., a.b., m.a., m.d., Attending Physician 

Standing Committees of the Faculty 

1936-1937 

Committee on Admission and Degrees 

The Dean, the Registrar, Rev. Patrick H. Yancey,s.j., Rev. William 

A. Mulherin, s.j., Professor Kermit T. Hart. 
Committee on Examinations 

Rev. John V. Deignan, s.j., Rev. Francis L. Janssen, s.j., Profes- 
sor Jose Martinez. 
Committee on Student Activities 

Rev. David R. Lorig, s.j., Mr. Guy J. Lemieux, s.j., Mr. E. Day 

Stewart, s.j., Professor Edmund B. Sullivan. 
Committee on Curricular Problems 

Rev. Patrick H. Yancey, s.j., Rev. William F. Obering, s.j., Rev. 

John Hutchins, s.j., Mr. Jacques Yenni, s.j., Professor L. E. 

Loveridge. 
Committee on Student Discipline 

Rev. John W. Hynes, s.j., Mr. William P. Donnelly, s.j., Mr. 

G. J. Lemieux, s.j. 
Committee on Publications 

Mr. William P. Donnelly, s.j., Mr. Joseph Fichter, s.j., Professor 

E. Barre. 
Committee on Athletics 

Rev. J. L. Dorn, s.j., Rev. D. R. Lorig, s. j„ Professor W, T. Daly, 

Professor M. J. Donahue. 



Officers of Instruction 



Reverend Warren Joseph Barker, s.j., a.m., Professor of Public 
Speaking and Latin, 1936-1937. 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1928; A.M., 1929. 

Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1929-1932; Instructor in Latin, 
Loyola University, New Orleans, Summer, 1936. 

Edgar Barre, Instructor in Commerce 

Commercial Certificate, St. Joseph's College, 1911. 

Instructor, St. Paul's College, Covington, La., 1911-1918; Instructor, 
Spring Hill High School, 1918-1921; Registrar, Spring Hill College, 1927- 
1928; Secretary to the President and Instructor in Commerce, 1928- 

Louis J. Boudousquie, M.S., Registrar, Professor of Drawing, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Spring Hill, 1917; M.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1936. 

Instructor in Mathematics, McGill Institute, Mobile, 1921-1928; Regis- 
trar, Professor of Drawing, and Associate Professor of Mathematics, 
Spring Hill. 1928- 

Edward Victor Cupero, mus.d., Director of Band, Orchestra and 
Glee Club; Professor of Music 

B.Mus., Royal Conservatory, Naples, 1896; Mus.D., 1898. 

Conductor, Baltimore Symphony, 1915; Conductor, Albany Symphony, 
1932-1934; Professor of Music, Spring Hill, 1934- 

William Thomas Daly, ph.b., Professor of Economics; Instructor 
in Physical Education; Coach, Football and Baseball 

Ph.B., Holy Cross College, Worcester, Mass., 1920. 

Instructor in Business Administration, St. Charles College, Grand 
Coteau, La., 1920-1922; Instructor and Athletic Director, Jesuit High, 
New Orleans, 1922-23; Instructor in Economics and Physical Education, 
Loyola University, New Orleans, 1923-25; Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomics, Director of Physical Education, Spring Hill, 1925-1931; Pro- 
fessor of Economics, Coach, 1935- 

Reverend John Vincent Deignan, s.j., a.m., ph.d., Professor of 
Chemistry, Head of Department 
A.B., National University, Dublin, 1907; A.M., Woodstock College, 
1917; Ph.D., Fordham University, 1929. 

Instructor in Chemistry, Spring Hill College, 1917-1922; Professor and 
Head of the Department, 1929- 

Michael Joseph Donahue, a.b., Director of Athletics, Associate 
Professor of Economics and Physical Education, Assistant Coach 
A.B., Yale, 1904. 

Instructor in Athletics, Yale, Summers, 1905-1907; Athletic Director 
and Professor of Physical Education, Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 
1905-1923; Athletic Director and Professor of Physical Education, Lou- 
isiana State University, 1923-1928; Spring Hill, 1930- 

William Patrick Donnelly, s.j., a.m., Associate Professor of 
History 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1932; A.M., 1934. 

Instructor in History and Latin, 1934-1935; Instructor in History and 
Education, 1935-1936; Associate Professor, 1936- 



Reverend Joseph Lambert Dorn, s.j., a.m., Professor of Education 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1924; A.M., 1925. 

Instructor, Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1925-1928; Director of 
Athletics, 1926-1928; Director of Athletics, and Professor of Education, 
Spring Hill, 1934- ; Prefect of Discipline, 1934-1935. 

Joseph H. Fichter, s.j., a.b., Instructor in Art and Ancient 
Classics, 1936- 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1935. 
Lester F. X. Guterl, s.j., m.a., Instructor in Education and Politi- 
cal Science, 1936- 
A.B., Villanova College, 1929, M.A., St. Louis University, 1937. 

Kermit Thomas Hart, b.s.b.a., Professor of Accounting and Busi- 
ness Administration; Head of the Department of Commerce 
B.S.B.A., University of Florida, 1927. 

Instructor, American Institute of Banking, Mobile Chapter, 1929-1934; 
Instructor in Accounting and Business Administration, Spring Hill 
College, 1928-1929; Professor, Head of the Department of Commerce, 
1929- 

Reverend John A. Hutchins, s.j., a.m., Professor of French 
A.B., Woodstock College, 1911; A.M., 1912. 

Instructor, St. Boniface High School, Winnipeg, Canada, 1913-1916; 
Jesuit High School, New Orleans, 1920-1921; Spring Hill High School, 
1925-1927; Professor of French, Spring Hill College, 1927- 

Reverend John W. HyNes, s.j., m.a., s.t.d., Professor of Public 
Speaking, Dean of Discipline, 1937- 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1908; M.A., 1909; S.T.D., Gregorian 
University, Rome, 1923. 

Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1912-1914; Dean, 1919-1921; Professor 
of Theology, St. Mary's Seminary, Mundelein, 111., 1923-1927; Dean, 
Loyola University, New Orleans, 1928-1931; President, Loyola Univer- 
sity, 1931-1936. 

Reverend Francis Louis Janssen, s.j., a.m., Professor of German, 
and Head of the Department of Languages 
A.B., Loyola University, New Orleans, 1920; A.M., Gonzaga Uni- 
versity, 1922. 

Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1924-1925; Professor of French, 
Loyola University, New Orleans, 1929-1932; Regent of Arts and Sciences, 
1931-1932; Professor of Modern and Ancient Languages, Spring Hill 
College, 1932- ; Head of the Department, 1934- 

Reverend Michael Kenny, s.j., ph.d., litt.d., Special Lecturer 
in Philosophy and Religion 
A.B., Royal Irish University, 1886; M.A., St. Mary's University, 
1892; Ph.D., Fordham University, 1927; Litt.D., Spring Hill, 
1930. 

Instructor in English and Classics, Spring Hill, 1899-1902 instructor in 
Philosophy, Sacred Heart College, Augusta, Ga., 1903-1908; Associate 
Editor of "America," 1908-1915; Regent of Law School, Professor of 
Jurisprudence and Legal Ethics, Loyola University, New Orleans, 1915- 
1924; Professor of Philosophy and Sociology, Spring Hill, 1924-1932; 
Professor Emeritus and Special Lecturer, 1932- 

Guy Joseph Lemieux, s.j., a.m., Instructor in English 

A.B., Loyola University, New Orleans, 1930; A.M., St. Louis Uni- 
versity, 1934. 

Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1935- 



Reverend David R. Lorig, s.j., a.m., Professor of Religion and 
Head of the Department 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1924; A.M., 1925. 

Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1925-1927; Jesuit High School, New 
Orleans, 1927-1928; Student Counsellor and Instructor, St. John's High 
School, Shreveport, La., 1932-1933; Student Counsellor, Jesuit High 
School, New Orleans, 1934-35; Student Counsellor, Professor of Religion 
and Head of the Department, Spring Hill College, 1935- 

Lawrence Earle Loveridge, b.s., m.a., ph.d., Professor of Physics 
and Mathematics 
B.S., University of Oregon, 1927; M.A., University of California, 
1929; Ph.D., 1931. 

Teaching Fellow in Physics, University of California, 1927-1931; Re- 
search Physicist in Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie 
Institution of Washington, 1931-1932; Professor of Mathematics, Seton 
Hall College, 1932-1935; Spring Hill, 1935- 

Jose' Martinez, a.b., b.s., ph.lic., Professor of Spanish 

A.B., B.S., Institute Nacional CC de Madrid, 1914; Ph.Lic, Uni- 
versidad Central de Madrid, 1919. 

Professor of Languages, Elizabethtown College, 1926-1929; Instructor 
in Spanish Language and Literature, University of Notre Dame, 1929- 
1931; Professor of Spanish (Extension), Indiana University, 1929-1931; 
Civilian Instructor, U. S. Military Academy, 1931-1935; Spring Hill, 1936- 

Reverend William Austin Mulherin, s.j., a.m., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Philosophy and Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1921; A.M., 1922. 

Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1922-1925; Principal, 1929-1930; 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Spring Hill College, 1931-1932; As- 
sociate Professor, 1932- ; Professor of Psychology, 1935- 

Joseph Otto Muscat, m.d., Associate Professor of Biology 

M.D., St. Louis University, School of Medicine, 1931. 
Lecturer in Anatomy, Spring Hill, 1935- 

Reverend William F. Obering, s.j., a.m., ph.d., Professor of 
Ethics and Sociology; Head of the Department of Philosophy 
A.B., St. Louis University, 1909; A.M., 1910; Ph.D., Fordham 
University, 1930. 

Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1907-1908; St. Charles College High 
School, Grand Coteau, La., 1910-1913; Assistant Professor of Philosophy, 
St. Charles College, 1918-1919; Loyola University, New Orleans, 1919- 
1920; Instructor in English, History, and Classics, Spring Hill, 1920- 
1927; Associate Professor of Philosophy, 1927-1928; Professor and Head 
of Department, 1930- 

Reverend Henry Allain St. Paul, s.j., m.a., Professor of History 

Head of the Department of History 

A.B., Gonzaga University, 1921; A.M., St. Louis University, 1935. 
Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1922-1926; Instructor in English, 
Loyola University, New Orleans, 1931-1932; Instructor in History, St. 
Louis University, 1932-1934. 

Reverend Andrew Cannon Smith, s.j., a.m., ph.d., Dean, Pro- 
fessor of English Literature, Head of the Department 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1923; A.M., Catholic University, 1930; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1934. 

Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1923-1924; Assistant Professor of Eng- 
lish Literature, Loyola University, New Orleans, 1931-1932; Dean and 
Associate Professor of English, Spring Hill College, 1934- ; Director of 
Summer Session ,1934, 1935. Head of the Department of English, 1936- 



Edward Day Stewart, s.j., a.m., Instructor in English, 1936- 

A.B., Spring Hill, 1929; A.M., St. Louis University, 1934. 
Instructor, Spring Hill High School, 1929-1930. 

Edmund B. Sullivan, b.s., m.s., Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 
1936- 
B.S., Holy Cross College, Worcester, Mass., 1932; M.S., 1934. 

Instructor, Holy Cross College, 1933-1934. 

Virginia Thompson, a.b., Instructor in Latin and History, 1936- 

A.B., University of Alabama, 1931. 
Reverend Joseph M. Walsh, s.j., m.a., ph.d., Professor of Latin 
and Religion 

A.B., Spring Hill College, 1903; A.M., Woodstock College, 1910; 

Ph.D., Woodstock College, 1918. 

Instructor, Spring Hill College, 1910-1915; Dean, Spring Hill College, 
1920-1922, 1924-1925; Associate Professor of Philosophy, Loyola Uni- 
versity, New Orleans, 1923-1924; President of Spring Hill College, 1925- 
1932. 

Reverend Patrick Henry Yancey, s.j., a.m., ph.d., Professor of 
Biology and Head of the Department 
A.B., Gonzaga University, 1918; A.M., 1919; Ph.D., St. Louis 
University, 1931. 

Instructor in Biology, Spring Hill, 1919-1923; Instructor in Biology, St. 
Louis University, 1930-1931; Professor of Biology and Head of the De- 
partment, Spring Hill, 1931- 

Jacques Yenni, s.j., m.a., Instructor in Freshman Mathematics and 
Mathematics of Accounting, 1936- 
B.S., Loyola University, New Orleans, 1930; A.M., St. Louis Uni- 
versity, 1936. 

Other Officers 

Edgar Barre, Secretary to the President 

Joseph G. Tyrrell, a.b., Assistant Treasurer 

Brother Francis Hinze, s.j., Dietician 

Mrs. Albert Levet, r.n., Director of the Infirmary 

Brother Joseph Eaton, s.j., Director of Laundry Service 

Clifford Louisell, Library Attendant 

Alvin Buckhaults, Golf Instructor 



Student Assistants 

Accounting: Harold G. Allen 

Biology: Milton Liebeskind 

Chemistry: Alvin B. Hayles, John C. Lawler 

Physics: Albert Pilkington, John Shearer 

Library: Harold D. Allen, Francis Andrews, George Ashbee, John 

Bacon, Billie Byrd, Adolph Elsevier, J. L. Hamilton, T. B. 

Jones, James Rogers, Francis Rosser, Thomas Steely. 

Registrar's Office: Marion Kent, J. T. Lee, Frank Hatcher 



Spring Hill College 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Historical Sketch 

The first Bishop of Mobile, the Right Reverend Michael Portier, 
D.D., laid the cornerstone of the first building of Spring Hill College 
on July 4, 1830. It stood on the site of the present Administration 
Building and was opened for classes in November, 1831. Five years 
later, the Governor of Alabama signed the legislative bill which 
chartered the Bishop's seminary-college and gave it "full power to 
grant or confer such degree or degrees in the arts and sciences, or in 
any art or science ... as are usually granted or conferred by other 
seminaries of learning in the United States." This power was used in 
the following year, 1837, when four graduates received their degrees. 
Spring Hill thus takes its place among the three oldest colleges in the 
South, while of Jesuit Boarding Colleges, it is the oldest after George- 
town. 

As the years went on and the college enrollment rose from thirty 
to more than a hundred, the Bishop found it more and more difficult 
to provide from the limited personnel of his missionary clergy the 
necessary minimum of priest-teachers and administrators. The first 
two Presidents of Spring Hill were called away to be Bishops, one 
of Dubuque (Bishop Loras), the other of Vincennes (Bishop Bazin), 
and the third, Father Mauvernay died after a very brief term of office. 
Reluctantly, Bishop Portier was compelled to transfer his college to 
a newly arrived French Congregation, the Fathers of Mercy. With 
little or no experience in teaching, these zealous missionaries found 
the direction of Spring Hill a thankless task and gave it up after two 
years. A similar experiment with the Eudists succeeded no better, and 
in 1845 the College suspended operations, pending some new arrange- 
ment. 

In this crisis the Lyons province of the Society of Jesus was per- 
suaded to take over Spring Hill, and the new regime was inaugurated 
with Father Francis Gautrelet, s.j., as President, in September, 1847. 
Since that time through many vicissitudes, the Jesuit Fathers have 
directed the policies of the college and endeavored to make it a center 
of liberal culture. During the Civil War studies continued without 
interruption, but a costly fire in 1869 destroyed the main building and 
required the removal of students and faculty to St. Charles College, 
Grand Coteau, Louisiana. Through the generous aid of many friends, 
particularly Bishop Quinlan, "the second founder," a new building 
rose on the site of the old and the new Spring Hill opened its doors. 

Until 1921 the High School and College Departments were not 
perfectly separate in organization and faculty, but after that date, a 
more clear-cut division was noticeable. Within a few years new build- 
ings arose on the western side of the campus, and thither the college 
removed for classes and recreation. With the close of the term in 1935, 

10 



Spring Hill College 

the High School department was discontinued, and the whole plant 
thus given over to the needs of the college.* 

Situation 

The college campus occupies some 700 acres of the elevation which 
gives its name to this residential suburb of Mobile. The city and Bay 
are both visible from the hill and easily accessible either by street car 
line or by the famous Old Shell Road, which passes the college gates. 
The village of Spring Hill has a post office, but no railroad station. 
The prospective student or visitor will therefore come first to Mobile, 
a beautiful city of the Old South, now nationally famous for its 
"Azalea Trail." 

Spring Hill is on the Azalea Trail, just six miles from the center 
of the city. The natural beauty of its well-chosen site, adorned with 
an almost endless variety of trees and shrubs and flowers, its lake, its 
shaded avenues, and the striking setting of its athletic fields and its 
buildings make the campus one of the most attractive in the United 
States. 

Owing to its altitude and to the invigorating influence of its resin- 
ous pines upon the surrounding atmosphere, Spring Hill holds one 
of the best records for health in the country. The air is pure and 
bracing, and even in the hottest summer months, the temperature, 
thanks to the nearby Gulf, is usually several degrees lower than in the 
neighboring city. The mildness of the climate all the year round makes 
it possible for outdoor sports to continue without interruption. 

Buildings 

The Administration Building stands on the site of the first building 
which Bishop Portier erected for his pioneer college. The present 
plant, erected partly in 1869, partly in 1909, to replace the damage 
caused by historic fires, is a brick structure several hundred feet in 
length and three stories high. Covered Spanish colonnades join it to 
the Dining Hall on the west, the Infirmary on the east, and the 
Chapel on the north. The building itself is occupied by the Faculty 
and the administrative offices. Class-rooms are also located in this 
building. 

The Infirmary Building is the only building in present use which 
antedates the fire of 1869. On the first floor is located the pharmacy 
under the charge of a registered nurse; and the rooms on the second 
floor are equipped to take care of all ordinary cases of illness. 



♦Those interested in the full story of the first hundred years of Spring 
Hill should read Kenny, M., "Catholic Culture in Alabama" (Centenary 
History of Spring Hill College). New York: America Press, 1931. 

11 



Spring Hill College 

The Refectory Building across the quadrangle from the Infirmary 
contains the dining halls for faculty and students. The faculty hall 
upstairs is brightened by the painting which Napoleon's uncle, Card- 
inal Fesch, presented to his friend, Bishop Portier for his new college. 
The students' dining room is panelled in dark oak and decorated with 
the seal of St. Ignatius Loyola. 

The College Chapel, dedicated to the Patron of the College, St. 
Joseph, was built in 1910. It is modified Gothic in style, and beauti- 
fully appointed within. 

Yenni Hall, erected and named in memory of Father Dominic Yenni, 
S.J., Professor of Latin and Greek at Spring Hill for over fifty years, 
and author of Yenni 's Latin and Greek Grammars, is entirely de- 
voted to Science. Here are installed on different floors the Physics, 
Chemistry, and Biology lecture rooms and laboratories, and the 
Seismographic Station. 

The Thomas Byrne Memorial Library, the newest building on the 
campus, is the gift of Mrs. Byrne in memory of her husband and son. 
It was completed in 1930. It has room for 150,000 volumes. The gen- 
eral reading room is large enough to accommodate 200 students at 
one time. There are besides smaller rooms for research and conference, 
and one large lecture room. A special section of the building contains 
the Lavretta Library, donated by Mr. L. C. Lavretta, a Mobile 
alumnus. 

The College Inn is a recreation center midway between the golf course 
and Mobile Hall. It contains a dance-hall, billiard room, and a 
fraternity meeting-room. 

The Gymnasium is located in a building just west of the Dining Hall. 
It contains a basket-ball court, locker rooms, and showers. Next door 
is the Auditorium. 

Quinlan Hall is the name given to the long corridor of rooms, built 
over the Gymnasium- Auditorium Building in 1916, and named in 
honor of Spring Hill's second founder, Bishop Quinlan. There are 
40 living rooms in the building, each equipped with clothes-press and 
lavatory. 

Mobile Hall is the newest dormitory building. Dedicated November 
6, 1927, it gave a new center to the college campus. Built on modern 
lines and with ample provision for the future growth of the college, 
it has space and equipment for housing over 200 students. Tempor- 
arily some of the rooms on the first floor have been arranged as offices 
and class rooms. The living-rooms in this building are bright and 
airy, and provided with every modern convenience. 
The Stadium. The growing importance of athletics was recognized in 
1935 by the erection on beautiful Maxon Field of a long-needed 
stadium. It is built to accommodate 4000 spectators and equipped 
with floodlights for night football. 

12 



Spring Hill College 

Scholastic Standing 

The scholastic standing of Spring Hill as a senior college is 
attested by the fact that it is a member of, affiliated with, or approved 
by the following educational organizations : 

The Jesuit Educational Association 

The National Catholic Educational Association 

The Association of American Colleges 

The Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

The Alabama College Association 

The University of Alabama 

The State Department of Education 

The Dixie Athletic Conference 

Statement of Objectives 

Ultimate Objective 

As a Jesuit Liberal Arts College, Spring Hill has the same primary 
purpose as the Catholic educational system taken in its entirety. This 
is best expressed in the words of Pope Pius XI : "The proper and im- 
mediate end of Christian education is to cooperate with divine grace 
in forming the true and perfect Christian, that is, to form Christ 
Himself in those regenerated by baptism. . . The true Christian, pro- 
duct of Christian education, is the supernatural man who thinks, 
judges and acts constantly and consistently in accordance with right 
reason, illumined by the supernatural light of the example and teach- 
ing of Christ; in other words, to use the current term, the true and 
finished man of character." 

Immediate Objectives 

It is in terms of this end that the Jesuit College of Liberal Arts 
conceives its special function in contemporary American life. Ob- 
viously, then, it will not neglect the field of religion. Instruction in 
Catholic faith and morals will always be a part of its task. But it is 
not the whole. The Jesuit college by its traditions can never be con- 
tent with simply presenting Catholicism as a creed, a code or cult. It 
must strive to communicate the riches of Catholicism as a culture, thus 
giving the modern man a coign of vantage whence to view with under- 
standing not merely the facts in the natural order, but those in the 
supernatural order also, those facts which give meaning and co- 
herence to the whole life. 

Jesuit education regards the college of liberal arts as the heart of 
its system. It is through the instrumentality of such colleges that 
Catholic leaders will be formed, men and women who have been 
trained spiritually and intelligently in the Catholic sense, who have 
intelligent and appreciative contact with Catholicism as a culture, 
who through their general education in the college of arts have so de- 

13 



• Spring Hill College 

veloped their powers of mind and heart and will that they can take 
an active part in the service of Church and society. 

The Jesuit college in its teaching aims at reaching the whole man, 
his intellect, his will, his emotions, his senses, his imagination, his 
aesthetic sensibilities, his memory, and his powers of expression. It 
seeks to lift up man's whole being to that broad, spiritual outlook on 
life whereby he not only understands and appreciates the fact that our 
entire social heritage is bound up with the Truth, Goodness and 
Beauty of God as seen in Revelation, Nature, Art, and Language, but 
is likewise willing and ready to become identified with those activities, 
individual as well as collective, that make for the sanctification of 
the individual and the betterment of society. 

The Jesuit college strives to provide a broad foundation in general 
education, upon which advanced study in a special field may be 
built. 

In addition to these objectives held in common with all Jesuit 
colleges, Spring Hill aims by proper direction in the choice of elec- 
tive studies to prepare her graduates for successful work in profes- 
sional schools and in business. 

The Government and Welfare of the Students 

The Discipline 

Spring Hill is committed to the belief that a system of education 
which discounts the formation of character is pernicious. For this 
reason opportunity is given to learn the important lesson of obedience 
to salutary laws and restraints. Everywhere necessary for ordered 
living, discipline is imperative when restless youths are forming a 
community of their own, as they do in a boarding school. Whatever 
the age of the students, and their opinion of their abilities to shape 
their own lives, the authorities of the school feel for their charges the 
responsibility of a parent. Rules are therefore made governing the 
out-of-class life of the students, particularly their social activities 
and absences from the campus. These rules and the sanctions for 
their observance are made known to the student from the beginning. 
Their enforcement, while considerate, is unflinchingly firm. 

Naturally, in addition to minor breaches of college discipline, there 
occur at times serious offenses which require drastic punishment, 
even suspension or dismissal from college. Such are: serious insub- 
ordination, repeated violation of regulations, neglect of studies, pos- 
session or use of intoxicating liquors; habitual use of obscene or 
profane language, and in general any serious form of immorality. In 
case of the suspension or dismissal of a student for such reasons, the 
tuition fee is not refunded. 

Without committing any overt act of the kind described in the 
preceding paragraph, a student may at times by constant and ill- 
founded criticism, or an habitual attitude of opposition to the college 
government become an undesirable member of the community. For 

14 



Spring Hill College 

such cases the college reserves the right to request any student to 
withdraw from school, with, however, an honorable dismissal, and 
the refund of such fees as may be refundable by the treasurer's regu- 
lations. 

Ordinarily the discipline at Spring Hill should furnish no serious 
difficulties to youths who come from Christian homes where filial 
obedience is practiced, and honor and self-restraint are held up as 
ideals of genuine character. 

Religious Life of Students 

The College is a Catholic institution intended primarily for Cath- 
olic students, but it aloes not exclude those of other religious beliefs 
who may wish to take advantage of its system of education. As a 
rule about 25 per cent of the whole student body, and about 5 per 
cent of the boarding students are non-Catholic. Special courses in 
religion are provided for the non-Catholics to replace the required 
courses in Catholic religion. They are permitted and encouraged to 
attend to their own religious obligations on Sunday. By exception they 
are expected and required to assist as part of the student body at the 
collegiate chapel services listed in the annual College Calendar. 

The Catholic students are given every opportunity to learn their 
religion in theory and in practice. A graded course in Religion is 
offered, running through four years, and all Catholics are obliged 
to register for these courses. Credits are given for the courses and 
required for graduation. 

Except on special occasions daily Mass is part of the order of the 
day for boarding students. Frequent, even daily, Communion is en- 
couraged and quite generally practiced. Special devotions are prac- 
ticed towards the Sacred Heart on the first Friday of the month, 
and towards the Blessed Virgin Mary during the months of October 
and May. A wonderful occasion of grace for many is the annual three- 
day Retreat given in the second semester and obligatory on all Cath- 
olic students, boarders and day scholars alike. The day scholars will 
be charged a nominal fee for board and lodging during the three days 
of the exercises. 

One of the Fathers on the Faculty is appointed as counsellor or 
advisor of the students. His principal duty is to direct the spiritual 
activities of the college and the various religious societies and so- 
dalities, in regard to which he exercises much the same supervision as 
the Prefect of Discipline exercises in his department. 

He is in a special sense the friend and advisor of the students, not 
only in matters directly spiritual but also material and temporal, in 
their studies, their social duties, and in other intimate and personal 
matters. One of the questions of highest importance to every college 
graduate is the wise choice of a profession or vocation, according to 
one's character, talents and attractions, both natural and supernatural. 
In this matter the assistance of the Student Counsellor will be in- 
valuable. His hours will be arranged so as to afford ample oppor- 
tunity of conferring with him. 

15 



Spring Hill College 

EXPENSES 

General (per year) 

Tuition $150.00 

Board 240.00 

Activities Fee: library, entertainment, athletic fee . . 50.00 

Medical Fee: (for resident students only) 20.00 

These expenses and fees are payable in advance in semi-annual 
installments. In the case of resident students, $230.00 payable on 
the opening of school in September, and $230.00 payable on 
February 1st. In the case of day students, $100.00 payable on 
the opening of school in September and $100.00 payable on Feb- 
ruary 1st. 

Note: Activities fee is payable by all students including those 
enjoying the benefits of a scholarship. The Medical Fee takes 
care of medical attention by the Staff Physician and ordinary 
nursing in the College Infirmary not in excess of ten days. 

A Matriculation Fee of $10.00 is payable on first entrance only. 
The above are fixed charges for every student. 

Room Rentals (per year) 

Quinlan Hall ............ $100.00 

Mobile Hall 150.00 

This expense includes laundry and is payable one-half at the op- 
ening of school in September and one-half on February 1st. 
Rooms are shared by two occupants. Single occupancy entails 
an extra fee of $50.00 for the year. A deposit of $10.00 for room 
reservation must accompany each application for entrance. This 
deposit is not applied to room rent but is retained to cover any 
damage beyond reasonable wear which may be done to the room 
or its furnishings while occupied by the students. The balance 
is returned to the parents when the student withdraws from the 
College. This deposit is not returned in case of failure to occupy 
a room. Rooms are equipped with shower bath and toilet, and 
are supplied with hot and cold water and all necessary heavy 
furnishings. Students supply their own toilet linen, rugs and 
whatever decorations are appropriate. 

16 



Spring Hill College 

Other Fees (per year) 

Physics, Chemistry, Biology — Laboratory, each .... $15.00 

Breakage deposit (in each Science course — refundable) . . 5.00 

Accounting Laboratory 10.00 

Special Courses in Accountancy 2.00 

Stenography and Typewriting, each 20.00 

Surveying 5.00 

Drawing, if not in course 25.00 

Conditional Examination, on days assigned 1.00 

Conditional Examination, on other than assigned days . . 2.00 

Special Examination 5.00 

Make-up Laboratory period, each . . . . . . . . 1.00 

Duplicate Transcript of Record ........ 1.00 

Fee for Late Registration 5.00 

Golf Membership Fee 10.00 

Lunch for day students on class days 50.00 

Graduation Fee, final year only 15.00 

Treasurer s Regulations 

All bills are payable in advance at the beginning of each semester, 
namely, in September and February. All checks should be made pay- 
able to Spring Hill College and addressed directly to the Treasurer. 
Those desiring to send postal Money Orders should have them drawn 
on the Mobile Post Office. 

All minor expenses, for books, stationery, etc., are on a strictly 
cash basis. Money for the personal accounts should be sent directly 
to the student, who alone will be responsible to the parents or guard- 
ians, for an itemized statement of expenditures. This money may be 
deposited for safe keeping with the Treasurer, but in this case, par- 
ents must state in writing a definite amount to be given weekly to the 
student. No advance of money will ever be made at any time for any 
purpose whatever. In case of emergency, students should have money 
wired to them. 

If a student is withdrawn before the end of the semester, no de- 
ductions will be made. Should, however, a student leave on account 
of prolonged illness, or be dismissed honorably, a deduction for 
board and room rental, but not for tuition and fees, will be made for 

17 



Spring Hill College 

the remainder of the semester, beginning with the first of the follow- 
ing month. The date on which notice is received by the Treasurer is 
considered the date of withdrawal. 

No student may have an honorable dismissal nor will he be given 
credit for his studies or be admitted to the examination in January 
or May until all indebtedness to the College has been settled. 

The College will not be responsible for books, clothing, jewelry or 
any other articles possessed by the student while in school or left by 
him at his departure. 

Students' visitors who stay at the College will be charged for board 
and lodging at the rate of $2.00 per day. 



Plans of Payment 

Although the general regulation calls for payment in two semi- 
annual installments, the College offers two alternate plans of pay- 
ment: 

First Plan : As a special inducement to early registration and full pay- 
ment in advance and with a view to cooperating with parents who 
wish to effect a saving, reductions are available on tuition, board and 
room rental only, as follows : 

A discount of 6 per cent where payment for the Year is made in 
full prior to July 1 . 

A discount of 4 per cent where payment for the Year is made in 
full prior to August first. 

A discount of 2 per cent where payment for the Year is made in 
full before the end of the first week of classes. 

Second Plan: Payments on tuition, board and room rental may be 
made in nine monthly installments, in advance, beginning with Sep- 
tember and ending in May. An extra charge of $3.00 in the case of 
resident students, and $1.00 in case of day students, will be added 
each month, should parents elect to pay on the monthly plan. 

Special arrangements for any other alternative plan of payments, 
or possible reduction in the case of brothers, must be made before the 
opening of classes, with the Treasurer. 

An interest charge of 5 per cent will be added to accounts past 
due. 

18 



Spring Hill College 



ADMISSION 



Subjects Accepted for Admission 

The subjects accepted for admission and their values in units are given below 
in tabulated form. Fuller definition of the units, or information concerning 
the acceptance of subjects not listed below, may be had by writing to the 
Registrar. 



Subjects 


Topics 


Units 


English A 
English B 
English C 
English D 


Advanced Grammar and Composition 
Composition and Rhetoric 
Critical Study of English Literature 
History of English or American Literature 


1 

1 
1 
1 


Mathematics Al 
Mathematics A2 

Mathematics B 
Mathematics C 
Mathematics D 


Algebra to Quadratic Equations 
Quadratics, Progressions, and the Binomial 

Formula 
Plane Geometry 
Solid Geometry 
Arithmetic 


1 

%tol 
1 
% 

y 2 


History A 
History B 
History C 
History D 


Greek and Roman History 

Medieval and Modern European History 

English History 

American History 


i 
i 
i 

i 


Latin A 
Latin B 
Latin C 
Latin D 


Grammar, Composition and Translations 
Caesar's Gallic War, I- II; Grammar, Comp. 
Cicero's Orations (5); Grammar; Composition 
Vergil's Aeneid, I-IV; Grammar; Composition 


i 

i 
i 
i 


German A 
German B 


Elementary Grammar, Composition, Trans. 
Intermediate Grammar, Composition, Trans. 


i 
i 


French A 
French B 


Elementary Grammar, Composition, Trans. 
Intermediate Grammar, Composition, Trans. 


i 
i 


Spanish A 
Spanish B 


Elementary Grammar, Composition, Trans. 
Intermediate Grmmar, Composition, Trans. 


i 
i 


Science A 
Science B 
Science C 
Science T> 
Science E 
Science F 
Science G 


Physical Geography 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Botany 

Zoology Biology 

Physiology 

General Science 


i 

i 

i 

% 

y 2 

% 

% tol 


Social Science A 
Social Science B 
Social Science C 


Civil Government 

Economics 

Sociology 


lto2 
1 to 2 
lto2 


VOCATIONAL SUBJECTS (Not more than Three Units) 


Manual and Mil- 
itary Training 


Drawing 
Shop Work 
R.O.T.C. 
Physical Training 


% to 2 
%to2 
y 2 tol 
% tol 


Agriculture 


(Accredited Agricultural School Course 


lto2 


Commercial 
Subjects 


Business English 
Commercial Geography 
Shorthand 
Typewriting 
Bookkeeping 
Commercial Arithmetic 


y* toi 
% 

%tol 

% 

% tol 

Vz tol 


Home Econom- 
ics and Music 


Cooking 

Sewing 

Music 


1 to 2 
1 to 2 

1 to 2 



19 



Spring Hill College 
Credentials 

The College requires for admission the satisfactory completion of a 
four-year course in a secondary school approved by a recognized ac- 
crediting agency or the equivalent of such a course. All candidates 
for admission to Freshman year must present fifteen units in accept- 
able subjects. A unit represents a year's study in any subject, con- 
stituting approximately a quarter of a full year's work. This defi- 
nition of a unit takes the four-year high school as a basis and assumes 
that the length of the school year is from thirty-six to forty weeks, 
that a period is from forty-five to sixty minutes in length, and that 
the study is pursued for four or five periods a week. 

Required Subjects for Admission 

Of the 15 units presented for admission to Freshman class, not 
more than three may be commercial, industrial, or vocational subjects. 
Specified units for all students are : English, 3 ; History, 1 ; Language, 
2. Candidates for the A.B. degree must present at entrance (or secure 
during Freshman and Sophomore years) Latin, 4. Candidates for the 
B.S. degree must present Science, 1, and Mathematics, 3. Candidates 
for the B.S.C. must present Bookkeeping, 1. 

Methods of Admission 

Candidates are admitted either on certificate or by examination. 

Admission by Certificate 

Admission by certificate is granted applicants from all schools on 
the approved list of the Commission on Accredited Schools of the 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern States 
and of other recognized accrediting agencies outside the territory em- 
braced by the Southern Association. 

Blank forms of entrance certificates, which are to be used in every 
case, may be had on application to the Registrar. Certificates must be 
made out and signed by the Principal or other recognized officer of the 
school, and mailed by him directly to the Registrar. It is expected 
that the Principal will not recommend all graduates, but only those 
whose ability, application and scholarship are such that the school 
is willing to stand sponsor for their success in college. 

Admission by Examination 

Applicants who are not entitled to admission by certificate must 
take examinations in the required entrance units. These examinations 
are held during the week preceding the opening of classes. 

20 



Spring Hill College 

Admission to Advanced Standing 

Students applying for admission from standard institutions of col- 
legiate rank will be given advanced standing provided the credits of 
the institution are acceptable and sufficient to be considered equivalent 
to the work done in the corresponding classes at Spring Hill. 

Such candidates should present in advance of registration: 

1. A certificate of honorable dismissal from the school last at- 
tended. 

2. An official transcript of college credits, with specifications of 
courses, year when taken, hours and grades. 

Special Students 

Mature and earnest students, who either are lacking in the required 
units or wish to pursue particular studies without reference to gradua- 
tion, may be admitted by the permission of the Dean to such course 
of their own choice as they seem qualified to take. The work done by 
these students cannot be counted later on toward a degree at Spring 
Hill unless all entrance requirements have been satisfied. 

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES OF THE 
VARIOUS DEGREES 

The objective of the Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) degree or curriculum 
is to give a balanced cultural education as a foundation for full 
living. This objective is to be attained through the humanistic and 
philosophic disciplines, supplemented by training in scientific and 
mathematical thinking, the entire curriculum to be integrated by an 
acquaintance with the social and religious factors that have entered 
into the making of Western civilization, and that contribute to the 
solution of contemporary problems. 

The objective of the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree or curricu- 
lum is to give by means of the natural sciences, biology and mathe- 
matics, a thorough training in the scientific method as a basis of 
sound scientific thinking, balanced by cultural training in language, 
literature and history, and correlated as intimately as possible with 
scholastic philosophy. 

The objective of the Bachelor of Science in Commerce (B.S.C.) 
degree or curriculum is to give a systematic and balanced training 

21 



Spring Hill College 

in the problems and principles of business administration with 
specialization in one of three fields related to the world of commerce, 
supplemented by cultural work in language, history and scholastic 
philosophy. 

The objective of the Bachelor of Philosophy (Ph.B.) degree or 
curriculum is a systematic training in the social studies or in the 
modern literatures, with specialization in one or two fields, supple- 
mented by the scientific or mathematical disciplines, and intimately 
correlated with scholastic philosophy. 

Distinguishing Characteristics of Degrees 

The A.B. degree is conferred if the candidate has completed the 
full cycle of Scholastic Philosophy, and included in his course two 
years of college Latin. 

The Ph.B. degree is conferred if the candidate has completed the 
full cycle of Scholastic Philosophy, and a major or minor in Social 
Sciences, Modern Language or History. 

The B.S. degree is conferred on one who has concentrated his 
studies on Science or Mathematics. 

The B.S.C. degree is conferred on students who complete their 
program in the Department of Commerce. 



PROGRAMS OF CURRICULA 
A.B. 

Freshman 

First Semester: Sem. Second Semester: Sem. 

Hrs. Hrs. 

Latin ___--_- 3 Latin _______3 

Greek (or Mod. Lang.) _ _ 3 Greek (or Mod. Lang.) _ _ 3 

English _--_-_ 3 English ______ 3 

Mathematics _____ 4 Mathematics _ _ _ _ _ 4 

Science ______ 4 Science ______ 4 

Religion __--__ 1 Religion ______ 1 

Sophomore 

First Semester: Second Semester: 

Latin _______3 Latin _______3 

Greek (or Mod. Lang.) _ _ 3 Greek (or Mod. Lang.) _ _ 3 

English Literature _ _ _ 3 English Literature _ _ _ 3 

Sociology _____ _ 3 Sociology ______ 3 

Logic ___---_3 Philosophy _____ 3 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 

Religion ______ 1 Religion ______ 1 

22 



Spring Hill College 



Junior 



First Semester: 



Sem. 

Hrs. 
General Metaphysics _ _ 3 
History ______ 3 

Religion ______ 1 

Major ot Minor Elect. _ _ 9 



First Semester: 
Ethics ______ 

Religion _____ 

Special Metaphysics _ 
Major or Minor Elect. _ 



Second Semester: Sem. 

Hrs. 
Psychology _____ 4 

History ______ 3 

Religion ______ 1 

Major or Minor Elect. _ _ 9 



Senior 

Second Semester: 
4 Ethics _--_-_ 

1 Religion _____ 

3 History of Philosophy _ 

6 Major or Minor Elect. _ 



Ph.B. 



First Semester: 

Modern Language _ _ 
Science (or Math) _ _ 
English _____ 
History _____ 
Sociology (or Polit. Sci.) 
Religion _ _ _ 



Sem. 
Hrs. 
_ 3 
_ 4 
_ 3 
_ 3 
3 
1 



Freshman 

Second Semester: 



Modern Language _ _ 
Science (or Math) _ _ 
English _____ 
History _____ 
Sociology (or Polit. Sci.) 
Religion _____ 



Sem. 
Hrs. 
_ 3 
_ 4 
_ 3 
_ 3 
3 
1 



First Semester: 



Sophomore 

Second Semester: 



Modern Language _ _ _ 3 
English ______ 3 



Logic _____ 
Economics _ _ _ 
Polit. Sci. (or Sociol.) 
Public Speaking _ _ 
Religion _ _ _ _ 



Junior 

First Semester: 

Philosophy _____ 3 

Religion ______ 1 

Electives ______ 12 



Modern Language _ _ _ 3 

English ______ 3 

Philosophy _____ 3 

Economics _____ 3 

Polit. Sci. (or Sociol.) _ _ 3 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 

Religion _______ 



Second Semester: 
Philosophy _____ 3 

Religion ______ 1 

Electives _____ 12 



Senior 

First Semester: 

Ethics _______ 4 

Special Metaphysics _ _ 3 

Religion ______ 1 

Electives ______ 6 



Second Semester: 
Ethics _______4 

Hist. Phil. _____ 2 

Religion ______ 1 

Electives ______ 7 



23 



Spring Hill College 



B.S. (with major in Biology) 



Freshman 



First Semester: 



Sem. 

Hrs. 
General Biology _ _ « - 4 
Chemistry _ - _ _ - 4 
French (or German) _ - 3 
English ------- 8 

Mathematics _____ 4 

Religion ____--! 



Second Semester: 

General Biology _ _ 

Chemistry _ _ - 
French (or German) 

English _ _ _ _ 

Mathematics _ _ _ 

Religion _ _ _ _ 



Sem. 
Hrs. 
_ 4 
_ 4 
. 3 
_ 3 
_ 4 
_ 1 



First Semester: 



Sophomore 

Second Semester: 



Comp. Anatomy _ - _ - 4 
Gen. Physics _ _ _ - _ 4 
Qualitative Chem. _ _ _ 4 
French (or German) _ _ 3 
Logic _______3 

Religion ______! 



Genetics ______ 2 

Mamalian Anatomy _ _ _ 2 
Quantitative Chem. _ _ _ 4 
French (or German) _ _ 3 
Philosophy _____ 3 

Religion ______! 



Junior 



First Semester: 

Histology ______ 4 

Organic Chemistry _ _ _ 4 

Philosophy _____ 3 

English ______ 3 

History _____ 3 

Religion ___'___ 1 



Second Semester: 

Vertebrate Embryology _ 4 

Organic Chemistry _ _ _ 4 

Psychology _____ 4 

English ______ 3 

History ______ 3 

Religion ______! 



First Semester: 

Introd. Gen. Physiol. _ 
Physiolog. Chemistry _ 
Physical Chemistry _ _ 
Ethics ______ 

Religion _____ 



Senior 

Second Semester: 

4 General Physiology _ _ _ 4 

3 Microscopic Technique _ 2 

3 Physical Chemistry _ _ . 3 

4 Ethics _______4 

1 Religion ______! 



B.S. (with major in Chemistry) 



First Semester: 



Sem. 

Hrs. 
English _____ _ 3 

Maths. __-_---4 
Mod. Lang. _ _ _ _ - 3 

Gen. Inorg. Chem. _ - _ 4 
Public Speaking _ _ - - 1 
Drawing ------ 2 

Religion _-___- 1 



Freshman 

Second Semester: 



English _____ 

Maths. ______ 

Mod. Lang. _ _ _ _ 

Gen. Inorg. Chem. _ _ 
Public Speaking _ _ _ 
Drawing ______ 2 

Religion ------ I 



Sem. 
Hrs. 
_ 3 
_ 4 
_ 3 
_ 4 
_ 1 



24 



Spring Hill College 



Sophomore 



First Semester: 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

Physics ______ 4 

Qualit. Analysis _ _ _ _ 4 

Mod. Lang. _____ 3 

Logic _______3 

History ______ 3 

Religion --____! 



Second Semester: Sem. 

Hrs. 

Physics ______ 4 

Quant. Analysis _ _ _ _ 5 

Mod. Lang. _____ 3 

Philosophy _____ 3 

History ______ 3 

Religion _______ 



First Semester: 
Gen. Metaphysics 
English _ _ _ 
Religion _ _ _ 
Organic Chemistry 
Maths, or Biology 



Junior 



Second Semester: 

Psychology _____ 4 

English ______ 3 

Religion ______ 1 

Organic Chemistry _ _ _ 4 

Maths, or Biology _ _ _ 4 



Senior 



First Semester: 
Ethics ______ 

Religion _ _ _ _ _ 

Physical Chem. _ _ _ 

Quantit. Analysis (4) or 

Physiological Chem. _ 

Elective _____ 



Second Semester: 
4 Ethics _______4 

1 Religion ______ 1 

3 Physical Chem. _ _ _ _ 3 

Quantit. Analysis (4) or 

3 Physiological Chem. _ _ 3 

3 Elective ______ 3 



B.S. (with major in Mathematics) 



Freshman 



First Semester: Sem. 

Hrs. 
Chemistry _____ 4 

English ______ 3 

Mathematical Analysis _ _ 4 
Mechanical Drawing _ _ 1 
Modem Language _ _ _ 3 
Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 1 

Religion ______! 



Second Semester: Sem. 

Hrs. 
Chemistry _____ 4 

English ______ 3 

Mathematical Analysis _ _ 4 
Mechanical Drawing _ _ 1 
Modern Language _ _ _ 3 
Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 1 

Religion ______! 



First Semester: 

Differential Calculus 
English Literature - 
General Physics _ _ 
Logic _____ 
Modern Language _ 
Religion _ _ _ _ 



Sophomore 

Second Semester: 

4 Integral Calculus 

3 English Literature 

4 General Physics _ 
3 Philosophy _ _ 
3 Modern Language 
1 Religion _ _ _ 



25 



Spring Hill College 



Junior 
First Semester: Sem. 

Hrs. 
Analytic Geometry _ _ _ 3 
Differential Equations _ _ 3 
General Metaphysics _ _ 3 
History ______ 3 

Religion ______ 1 

Elective ______ 3 

Senior 
First Semester: 

Analytical Mechanics _ _ 3 
Higher Algebra _ _ _ _ 3 

Ethics _______ 4 

Religion ______! 

Elective ______ 5 



Second Semester: Sem. 

Hrs. 

Advanced Calculus _ _ _ 4 

Psychology _____ 4 

History ______ 3 

Religion ______ 1 

Elective ______ 4 



Second Semester: 
Analytical Mechanics _ _ 3 
Theory of Equations _ _ 3 
Ethics _._____4 

Religion ______! 

Elective ______ 5 



B.S. (with major in Physics) 



First Semester: 

Chemistry _ _ _ 
English _ _ _ _ 
Mathematical Analysis 
Mechanical Drawing 
Modern Language _ 
Public Speaking _ _ 
Religion _ _ _ _ 



Freshman 

Sem. Second Semester: Sem. 

Hrs. Hrs. 

_ 4 Chemistry _____ 4 

_ 3 English ______ 3 

_ 4 Mathematical Analysis _ _ 4 

_ 1 Mechanical Drawing _ _ 1 

_ 3 Modern Language _ _ _ 3 

_ 1 Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 1 

_ 1 Religion ______! 



First Semester: 

Differential Calculus 
English Literature _ 
Logic _____ 
Modern Language _ 
General Physics _ _ 
Religion _ _ _ _ 



Sophomore 

Second Semester: 



Integral Calculus 
English Literature 
Philosophy _ _ 
Modern Language 
General Physics _ 
Religion _ _ _ 



Junior 



First Semester: 

Atomic Physics _ _ _ _ 3 

Differential Equations _ _ 3 

Electricity _____ 3 

General Metaphysics _ _ 3 

History ______ 3 

Religion ______! 



Second Semester: 

Atomic Physics _ _ _ _ 3 

Advanced Calculus _ _ _ 4 

Electricity _____ 3 

Psychology _____ 4 

History ______ 3 

Religion ______! 



Senior 



First Semester: 
Analytical Mechanics 
Ethics _____ 
Physical Optics _ _ 
Religion 



. 3 

. 4 

. 3 

. 1 

Elective ______ 5 



Second Semester: 
Analytical Mechanics _ 
Ethics _-_--- 
Thermodynamics _ _ 
Religion 



3 
4 
3 
1 
Elective ______ 5 



26 



Spring Hill College 

B.S.C. 



First Semester: 



Sem. 

Hrs. 
Accounting _____ 3 

Economics _____ 3 

English ______ 3 

Business Mathematics _ _ 3 
Modern Language _ _ _ 3 
Religion _______ 



Freshman 

Second Semester 



Sem. 

Hrs. 
Accounting _____ 3 

Economics _____ 3 

English ______ 3 

Business Mathematics _ _ 3 
Modern Language _ _ _ 3 
Religion ______ 1 



Sophomore 



First Semester: 

Accounting _____ 3 

Economics _____ 3 

English ______ 3 

Business Admin. _ _ _ 3 
Logic _______3 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 1 

Religion _______ 



Second Semester: 

Accounting _____ 3 

Economics _____ 3 

English ______ 3 

Business Admin. _ _ _ 3 

Philosophy _____ 3 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 1 

Religion _______ 



Junior 



First Semester: 

General Metaphysics 
Business Admin. 
Religion _ _ _ _ 
Major and Minor Elec. 



First Semester: 
Ethics _ _ _ 
Religion _ _ 
Major and Min. 



1 
9 

Senior 



Second Semester: 

Psychology _____ 4 

Business Admin. _ _ _ 3 

Religion ______ 1 

Major and Minor Elec. _ _ 8 



Elec. 



Second Semester: 
4 Ethics _ _ _ 

1 Religion - - 

12 Major and Min. 



Elec. 



4 
1 

10 



Special Pre-Professional Courses 

The best preparation for any profession is a complete four years' 
college course. 

Where students for financial or other reasons are unable to take 
the full college course, their studies may be selected so as to consti- 
tute a minimum preparation for their professional course. As a con- 
cession to such cases, Spring Hill, though primarily a Liberal Arts 
College, offers the following programs of study. 



27 



Spring Hill College 



Engineering Course 



Freshman 



First Semester: 

Chemistry _ _ _ . 
English _ _ _ _ . 
Mathematical Analysis. 
General Physics _ _ . 
Mechanical Drawing 
Religion ____.. 



Sem. 
Hrs. 
_ 4 
_ 3 
_ 4 
_ 4 
_ 2 
_ 1 



First Semester: 

Differential Calculus _ 
English _____ 
Drawing or Descript. Geo. 
Religion _____ 
♦Electives (science) _ _ 



Second Semester: 

Chemistry _ _ _ _ 
English _____ 
Mathematical Analysis. 
General Physics _ _ _ 
Mechanical Drawing _ 
Religion _____ 



Sem. 
Hrs. 
_ 4 
_ 3 
_ 4 
_ 4 
_ 2 
- 1 



Sophomore 

Second Semester: 
4 Integral Calculus 

3 English _ _ _ . 

3 Drawing or Descript. 

1 Religion _ _ _ . 

6 Electives _ _ _ . 



Geo. 



Pre-Legal Course 



Note: Most law schools admit all applicants who have successfully 
completed two years of a regular college course for a minimum of 60 
credit hours. A few with higher standards, among them Georgetown 
University, require an A.B. degree. 

The following is only one possible two-year program for future law 
students. 



First Semester: 

History _ _ _ 
Political Science 
Language _ _ _ 
Science (or Math.) 
English _ _ _ 
Religion _ _ _ 



Freshman 
Sem. Second Semester: 

Hrs. 



Sem. 
Hrs. 



3 History ______ 3 

3 Political Science _ _ _ 3 

3 Language ______ 3 

4 Science (or Math.) _ _ _ 4 
3 English ______ 3 

1 Religion _______ 



Sophomore 



First Semester: 

History ______ 3 

Language ______ 3 

Logic __-_---3 

Sociology ______ 3 

English ______ 3 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 

Religion ______ 1 



Second Semester: 

History ______ 3 

Language ______ 3 

Philosophy _____ 3 

Sociology ______ 3 

English ______ 3 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 

Religion _______ 



♦These electives should consist of additional courses in physics, mathe- 
matics, chemistry, or other special subjects as required by different 
engineering schools in the particular branches of engineering. 



28 



Spring Hill College 
Pre-Denta1 Course 



First Semester: 

Hrs. 

General Biology _ _ _ _ 4 

Inorganic Chemistry _ _ 4 

English ______ 3 

Modern Language _ _ _ 3 

♦Physics ______ 4 

Religion ______ 1 



Freshman 

Second Semester: 



Sem. 
Hrs. 

_ 4 
_ 4 



General Biology _ _ _ 
Inorganic Chemistry _ 
English ______ 3 

Modern Language _ _ _ 3 
^Physics ______ 4 

Religion _______ 



Sophomore 



First Semester: 

Comparative Anatomy _ _ 4 

Organic Chemistry _ _ _ 4 

English ______ 3 

Modern Language _ _ _ 3 

Physics ______ 4 

Religion _______ 



Second Semester: 

Quantitative Chemistry _ 4 

Organic Chemistry _ _ _ 4 

English ______ 3 

Modern Language _ _ _ 3 

Physics ______ 4 

Religion _______ 



Pre-Meclica1 Course 

The minimum requirement for admission to recognized medical 
schools, in addition to the high school requirement, is sixty semester 
hours of collegiate work extending through two years of at least 
thirty-two weeks each, in a college approved by the Council of Medi- 
cal Education of the American Medical Association. 

The subjects prescribed for the minimum of two years of college 
work are as follows: 

Chemistry _______ 12 

Physics ________8 

Biology ________8 

English composition and lit. _ _ 6 
Other non-science subjects _ _ 12 
French or German _ _ _ _ 8-12 



•Dental Schools accept High School Physics for credit but College 
Physics is highly recommended. If two years of Pre-Dental work be 
taken, Physics should be taken in the second year. If Physics is not 
taken, some mathematics or history should be substituted for it. 



29 



Spring Hill College 



Subjects strongly urged: 



Advanced botany or compara- 
tive anatomy _____ 3-6 

Psychology ______ 3-6 

Algebra and trigonometry _ _ 3-6 
Additional courses in chemistry 3-6 

Other suggested electives: 

English (additional), economics, 
history, sociology, political science, 
logic, Latin, Greek, drawing. 

The above represents the minimum requirements. Many medical 
schools have raised their standards and demand a three-year course 
of college preparation. It is to serve these that the Spring Hill pre- 
medical program is designed. The ideal preparation for the future 
doctor is the four-year course leading to a B.S., or preferably an A.B. 
degree. The student in this case, however, should make sure to include 
in his elective studies the courses listed above. 

Three- Year Program 



First Semester: 

General Biology _ _ _ 

Inorganic Chemistry _ 

French (or German) _ 

English _ _ _ _ _ 
Mathematical Analysis 

Religion _ _ _ _ _ 



First Year 

Sem. Second Semester: Sem. 

Hrs. Hrs. 

_ 3 General Biology _ _ _ _ 3 

_ 4 Inorganic Chemistry _ _ 4 

_ 3 French (or German) _ _ 3 

_ 3 English ______ 3 

_ 4 Mathematical Analysis _ 4 

_ 1 Religion _______ 



First Semester: 
Comparative Anatomy _ 
Qualitative Chemistry _ 
General Physics _ _ _ 
French (or German) _ 
Logic ______ 

Religion _ _ _ _ _ 



Second Year 

Second Semester: 

_ 4 Genetics ______ 2 

_ 4 Anatomy ______ 2 

_ 4 Quantitative Chemistry _ 4 

_ 3 General Physics _ _ _ _ 4 

_ 3 French (or German) _ _ 3 

_ 1 Philosophy _____ 3 

Religion _______ 



Third Year 



First Semester: 

Histology ______ 4 

Organic Chemistry _ _ _ 4 

General Metaphysics _ _ 3 

History ______ 3 

English ______ 3 

Religion _______ 



Second Semester: 

Vertebrate Embryology _ 4 

Organic Chemistry _ _ _ 4 

Psychology _____ 4 

History ______ 3 

English ______ 3 

Religion ______! 



30 



Spring Hill College 
Teacher Training 

Teachers' certificates which entitle the holder to teach in the schools 
of Alabama are issued by the State Department of Education to 
students of Spring Hill College who comply with the requirements 
set forth in the State bulletin. These requirements in the field of sec- 
ondary education may be fulfilled while the students are doing their 
work for college degrees. The types of certificates and the prescribed 
programs are given herewith. 

Secondary Professional Class C Certificates 

A Secondary Professional Class C Certificate may be issued to a 
person who started an approved teacher-training curriculum in Sep- 
tember 1930, or thereafter, who presents credentials showing: 

1. That he has completed a minimum of three years work in a 
standard institution, and ranks as a senior in a curriculum approved 
for the training of secondary teachers. 

2. That he has earned the following credits : 

Sem. 
Hrs. 

a) English ____________ 12 

b) History ____________6 

c) Political Science or Sociology or Economics _ 6 

d) Science (Biology recommended) _____ 6 

e) General Psychology _________3 

f) Education 

1. Educational Psychology ______ 3 

3. Principles of High School Teaching _ _ _ 3 
3. Electives in Secondary Education _ _ _ 6 
(Excess credits in required courses in Educa- 
tion will not be accepted in meeting any part 
of this requirement.) 

3. That he has to his credit an academic major of 18 semester hours 
in an approved subject. 

4. That he has to his credit an academic minor of 12 semester hours 
in an approved subject. 

Secondary Professional Class B Certificate 

To the requirement for the Class C Certificate must be added: 

1. A bachelor's degree from a standard institution in a curriculum 
approved for the training of secondary teachers (Spring Hill is such 
an institution). 

2. The following Education credits: 

Materials and Methods of teaching: Major, 3 sem. hrs.; Minor, 3 

sem. hrs. 

Practice Teaching in Major or Minor: 3 sem. hrs. 

3. The academic major in approved subject must be 24 hours. 

4. The academic minor in approved subject must be 18 hours. 

31 



Spring Hill College 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

General Requirements 

The conditions for the Baccalaureate degrees are the following: 

1. The satisfactory completion of the four years' course leading to 
the degree for which the student is a candidate. 

2. A written thesis approved by the Dean of the College and pre- 
sented on or before April 1st of the year in which the degree is to be 
conferred. 

3. In order to be accepted in fulfillment of any requirement for the 
degree, all work must be completed with a grade of D (70-75) or over, 
and the general average of the work must be of Grad C (75-84) or 
above. 

4. At the end of his Senior year the student must pass a compre- 
hensive examination on the various courses offered as major. 

5. The Senior year (or 24 of the last 30 credit hours) must be 
made at Spring Hill College. 

6. A graduation fee of fifteen dollars, payable in advance, and the 
settlement of all indebtedness to the. College. 

All applicants for a degree must file their applications and present 
all their credits and the evidence of having met all requirements listed 
above, on or before the first of April. 

Quality Points 

A candidate for a degree must gain not only the number of credits 
required, but his work must reach a certain standard of excellence. In 
addition to the 1 28 hours credit necessary for graduation, each student 
must earn at least 128 quality points, or an average mark in all sub- 
jects of C or better. 

No student will be advanced to candidacy for any collegiate degree 
whose credit points do not equal his semester hours at the beginning 
of his last semester. 

For a grade of A (92-100) in a given course, a student will receive 
three times as many quality points as there are hour credits in that 
course; for a grade of B (85-91), twice as many quality points; for 
a grade of C (75-84), as many quality points as credit hours. For 
example: a three-hour course in which the student receives A gives 
9 quality points; B, 6 quality points; and C, merely three quality 
points. 

32 



Spring Hill College 
Major and Minor Sequence 

There must be completed a Major Sequence of at least twenty-four 
hours in some subject (or at the discretion of the professor concerned 
and with the approval of the Dean, in some closely related group of 
subjects) and a Minor Sequence of at least eighteen hours. 

A major may be changed only by the consent of the Dean and the 
heads of the departments concerned, and such change will be per- 
mitted only upon the distinct understanding that all the courses pre- 
scribed in the major finally chosen shall be completed before gradua- 
tion. 

Electives 

Courses (a) not taken as prescribed courses, and (b) not included 
in the student's major and minor, may be chosen as approved electives 
to complete the 128 credits required for graduation. 

The two years of Modern Languages required for degrees must be 
of strictly college level. Hence students who are required to take an 
elementary language course, either for lack of two high school units 
in the modern language selected or because of inability to follow the 
intermediate language course, will receive no college credit for such 
elementary courses. 

In the choice of electives, each student must be guided by his pro- 
spective future work. He must ascertain, moreover, that such courses 
are open to his class ; that he has fulfilled the prerequisites, and that 
there will be no conflict in the schedule of recitations or laboratory 
periods. 

Graduation Honors 

Honors at graduation are granted on the basis of quality points in 
their ratio to the total number of credit hours carried. Thus, for ex- 
ample, a student who consistently made A (92-100) in all his subjects 
of a 128-hour program would have 284 quality points, for a quality 
quotient of 3. The honors to be inscribed on the diplomas, read at 
commencement, and published in the lists of graduates are awarded 
on the following scale: 

Maxima cum laude for a quality quotient of 2.8 ; 
Magna cum laude for a quality quotient of 2.5; 
Cum laude for a quality quotient of 2. 

33 



Spring Hill College 
Required Subjects 



Prescribed for the A.B. Degree: 

Sem. 

Hrs. 
Latin _______ 12 

Greek (Mod. Lang.) _ _ 12 
English ______ 12 

Science ______ 8 

Mathematics _____ 6 

History ______ 6 

Religion ______ 8 

Prescribed for the Ph.B. Degree: 

Modern Language _ _ _ 12 

English ______ 12 

Science (or Math.) _ _ _ 8 

History ______ 6 

Political Science _ _ _ 6 

Economics _____ 6 

Religion ______ 8 

Prescribed for the B.S. Degree: 

Chemistry _ _ _ _ _ 8 

Physics ______ 8 

Mathematics _ _ _ _ 8-16 

English ______ 12 

Modern Language _ _ _ 12 
History ______ 6 



Sem. 

Hrs. 

Logic _______3 

Metaphysics _____ 6 

Psychology _____ 3 

Ethics _______6 

Hist. Phil. _____ 2 

Sociology ______ 6 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 

Logic _______3 

Metaphysics _____ 6 

Psychology _____ 3 

Ethics _______6 

Hist. Phil. ______ 2 

Sociology ______ 6 

Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 

Logic _______3 

Metaphysics _____ 6 

Ethics _______6 

Psychology _____ 3 

Religion ______ 8 



Requirements for the B.S.C. Degree 



GROUP I (Accounting) 
Title 

Hrs. 

Principles of Accounting _ 6 

Intermediate Accounting _ 6 

Advanced Accounting - _ 6 
Analysis of Financial 

Statements _ _ _ _ 3 

Cost Accounting _ _ _ _ 3 

Federal Tax Accounting _ 3 
Auditing and C.P.A. 

Problems _____ 3 



GROUP II (Business Admin.) 
Title 

Hrs. 

Principles of Business _ _ 3 

Business Law _ _ _ _ 6 

Corporation Finance _ _ 6 

Money and Banking _ _ 3 

Business and Office Admin. 3 

Insurance ______ 3 

Real Estate _____ 3 

Investments _____ 3 



34 



Spring Hill College 

GROUP III (Economics) 

Title 

Hrs. 
Economic Geography _________3 

Economic History of the U. S. ______ 3 

Principles of Economics ________6 

Public Finance ___________3 

Transportation Principles ________3 

Foreign Trade ___________3 

Elements of Statistics _________3 

Advertising and Salesmanship ______ 3 

Principles of Marketing ________3 

There must be completed a Major Sequence of at least 24 hours in 
one of the above groups; a Minor Sequence of at least 18 hours in one 
of the remaining two groups, and 12 hours in the remaining group. 

The Unrelated Minor of 18 hours must be completed in Philosophy. 

The Prescribed Courses and Electives are: 

PRESCRIBED Hrs. ELECTIVES Hrs. 

Business Mathematics _ _ 6 Department of Commerce _ 6 

English _ _ _ _ _ _ 12 Other Departments _ _ _ 10 

History ______ 6 

Language (above element'y) 6 
Public Speaking _ _ _ _ 2 

Religion ______ 8 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



Oessions 

The school year begins in the second week of September and ends 
in the beginning of June. The year is divided into two semesters or 
sessions of eighteen weeks each. The first semester ends during the 
last week of January. The second begins immediately thereafter, with- 
out mid-year holidays. 

Attendance 

Since the purpose of college education is not only to impart infor- 
mation and develop the mental faculties, but also, if not chiefly, to 
train the student in habits of punctuality and fidelity to duty, prompt 
attendance at all class meetings is constantly stressed, and the co- 
operation of parents and guardians in this important matter is earn- 
estly requested. The date of registration and the limits of the various 
holiday periods are clearly stated in this catalogue, and will be strict- 
ly adhered to. 

While it is left to the discretion of the Dean to grant excuse for 
class absence in the case of sickness or similarly grave cause, the re- 

35 



Spring Hill College 

sponsibility for absence ordinarily rests with the student. It is to his 
interest to see that unauthorized absence from any course does not ex- 
ceed twice the number of semester hour credits allowed for that 
course. The penalty for such excessive absence is that the student's 
registration in such courses will be automatically canceled, and ac- 
cordingly no credit given for the course. In special cases, the delin- 
quent may be reinstated by the Committee on Registration and De- 
grees, upon written recommendation of his Instructor. 

Tardiness in class attendance is regarded as a partial absence. 
Three tardy marks will constitute one cut. Tardiness of more than 
fifteen minutes is considered absence. No absences from laboratory 
are excused. Work missed must be made up at the hours assigned by 
the instructor, and with a charge of $1 per period. 

Amount of Work 

The semester hour is the unit or standard for computing the amount 
of student's work. A semester hour is defined as one lecture, recitation 
or class exercise, one hour in length per week, for one semester. Two 
hours of laboratory work are equivalent to one recitation hour. Two 
hours of preparation on the part of the student is supposed for each 
lecture or recitation. 

A normal student load is from sixteen to eighteen hours per week. 
No candidate for a degree will be allowed to register for fewer than 
twelve or more than nineteen. 

Reference Study 

1. Students taking courses in Philosophy shall prepare and submit 
a term paper of 2,000 words dealing with the development of some 
specific topic of the subject-matter treated in class. 

2. Students taking courses in Education, History and Social 
Science will be required to hand in two papers each semester. These 
papers are to contain not less than 1000 words, and are to be based 
on the student's outside reading. 

3. All such and other prescribed written assignments will be held 
as prerequisites for graduation, for the fulfillment of which no student 
will be allowed any extension of time beyond April 1st of his Senior 
year. 

Examinations 

Examinations in all subjects are held at the end of each semester. 
Besides, there are intra-semestral tests. The semester examination, 
together with the average of the months preceding, determine the 
standing of a pupil for the semester. If a pupil, on account of sickness 

3p 



Spring Hill College 

or any other cause, misses a written test or examination in any 
subject, he will be required to make it up. In such cases, however, the 
responsibility rests with the student, and his record will show zero 
until such test or examination is taken. 

Seventy per cent is required for passing in each subject. Conditions 
may be incurred by failure to satisfy the requirements of any course, 
which requirements include the recitations, tests, and other assigned 
work, as well as the examinations. A condition due, either to failure 
in a monthly test or in a semester examination, may be removed by a 
supplementary test or examination. The supplementary tests may be 
taken at the convenience of the professor. The supplementary ex- 
aminations are held, upon recommendation of the department con- 
cerned and with the approval of the Dean of the college, during the 
first month of the succeeding semester. They may be taken only on 
the days specified, and may not be deferred, except with the express 
consent of the Dean. For each subject a fee is charged, payable in 
advance to the Treasurer of the college. Removal of conditions by 
examination shall not entitle the student to a grade higher than 
seventy per cent. 

A condition due to failure to complete assigned work may be 
removed by making up the required work. This ordinarily entails a 
fine of one dollar. 

Poor Scholarship — Dismissal 

Failure or unremoved condition in fifty per cent of his work in any 
semester renders a student liable to dismissal for poor scholarship. 
Exception to this rule is made only for weighty reasons. 

Low grades and neglect of work within the semester render a stu- 
dent liable to probation, including exclusion from extra-curricular ac- 
tivities; and failure to improve will entail reduction of schedule with 
a permanent record of failure in the subject canceled. 

A test in proficiency in English will be given all Juniors. Should 
any prove unsatisfactory, they will be required to take a course in 
remedial English. Passing this course by the beginning of their last 
semester is a condition of graduation. 

Promotion 

Those students are ranked as Sophomores who have at least twenty - 
four credit hours and points and have completed the prescribed courses 
of Freshman year; Juniors those who have fifty-six credits and points 
and have completed the prescribed courses of the Sophomore year; 
Seniors, those who have ninety-two credit hours and points and have 
completed the prescribed courses of the Junior year. 

Reports 

At least four times a year, i.e., in November, February, April and 
June detailed reports of scholarship and conduct are issued from the 

37 



Spring Hill College 

Dean's office. At other times also similar reports will be furnished 
to interested parents or guardians upon request. 

Transcript of Record 

Students wishing transcript of records in order to transfer from 
this college to another, or for any other purpose, should make early 
and seasonable application for the same. No statements will be made 
out during the busy periods of examination and registration. The 
first transcript of record is furnished free. For each adidtional copy 
there is a charge of one dollar. 

PART TIME COURSES 

For the convenience of teachers and others who have satisfied the 
requirements of college entrance, the College offers special courses 
in college subjects leading to the various bachelor degrees. Students 
who have not satisfied the requirements for college entrance may 
enroll in these courses for the cultural value and general information 
to be gained thereby, but credit will not be granted until the proper 
entrance credentials have been approved and filed. 

This part-time work is offered in Summer Session, in a Saturday 
morning course, and in a Night Course. 

The Summer Session runs for six weeks for a maximum of eight 
semester hours. The bulletin of this session is published in April. 

Saturday Courses 

On Saturdays from 8:30 to 12:30 courses are given on the college 
campus during a full year of thirty-four weeks. The length of the 
periods is so arranged that students may gain three semester hours 
credit in a subject by taking it through the year, or by taking a double 
period through the semester. The maximum number of credits is nine 
for the year's work. 

The Saturday Classes for 1937 begin on September 25th and close 
on May 28th. 

The tuition fee is the standard Alabama rate of $4 per semester 
hour. 

Might Courses 

Night classes are held three nights a week, Monday, Tuesday, and 
Thursday from 7:30 to 9:20 in Mobile, at the St. Joseph Parochial 
School, St. Louis Street and Jefferson Street. A student with the ap- 
proval of the Dean may carry two subjects for a total of six semester 
hours credit for each semester. 

The first semester of the Night Courses begins on September 27th 
and will run for seventeen weeks. The second semester begins on 
February 1st, and the Night Course will end on May 26th. 

The tuition fee for the Night Course is to be calculated on the same 
rate as the Saturday Course, $4 per semester hour credit. 

38 



Spring Hill College 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

For convenience of reference the courses offered in the various de- 
partments are listed alphabetically according to subjects. For ad- 
ministrative purposes all departments are under the control of the 
Dean of the College, assisted by the advice of the faculty assembly, 
and for particular subjects by divisional grouping of the staff: Phil- 
osophy and Religion; Sciences; Language and Literature; Social 
Studies; and Commerce. 

Cycle Courses 

Some courses, especially among those numbered 300 or higher are 
not given every year, but only in alternative years. The Faculty, 
moreover, reserves the right to withdraw any course for which there 
is not a sufficient number of applicants. 

Numbering of Courses 

Courses numbered less than 100 are preparatory courses designed 
to supply for high school deficiencies. They carry no college credit. 

Courses numbered 100-200 are ordinarily reserved to Freshmen 
and Sophomores. 

Courses numbered 200-300 are primarily intended for Sophomores; 
occasionally well-qualified Freshmen will be permitted to enroll for 
them. 

Courses numbered 300-400 are for Juniors, though Seniors may 
schedule them for full credit. 

Courses 400-S00 are strictly upper division courses, and primarily 
for Seniors. 

The last number indicates the semester in which the course is given, 
the odd numbers being for first semester courses, the even for second 
semester courses. 

Art 

101. HISTORY OF ART 

A history of the historical development of Art from prehistoric per- 
iod to the Renaissance; critical examination of the ancient classic 
orders in architecture, and the sculpture of Greece and Rome; Ro- 
manesque and Gothic styles. 

Texts: Reinach: Appollo, Part I; Professor's notes. 

102 RENAISSANCE AND MODERN ART 

Study of the art trends in architecture and sculpture from the Ren- 
aissance to the opening of the twentieth century; particular attention 
to the European schools of painting following the classical influences. 
Texts: Reinach: Appollo, Part II; Professor's notes. 

39 



Spring Hill College 
Biology 



101-102. GENERAL BIOLOGY 

An introductory course consisting of an outline of the physical struc- 
ture and chemical composition of protoplasm and the cell, the mor- 
phology and physiology of plant and animal types. 

Lectures two hours per week: laboratory four hours per w'eek. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

Given every year. 

103. GENETICS 

A survey course of the facts and theories of heredity and variation. 
Prerequisite: Biology 101 or equivalent. 

Lectures two hours per week. 

One semester. Two hours credit. 

Given every year. 

104-5. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

A course intended primarily for nurses. It consists of lectures and 
demonstrations in gross human anatomy and physiology and of lec- 
tures and laboratory work in histology and embryology. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory two hours per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

Given every year. 

106. LABORATORY TECHNIQUE 

A course designed for laboratory workers in hospitals and phy- 
sicians' offices. It includes lectures and laboratory Work in clinical 
pathology, hematology, serology and blood chemistry. No college 
credit will be given for the work but a certificate will be granted 
on the satisfactory completion of the course. 
Time to be arranged. 

201. COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF THE VERTEBRATES 

A comparative study of type forms with special reference to analogy 
and homology. Prerequisite: Biology 101-102. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

Given every year. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

202. MAMMALIAN ANATOMY 

An intensive laboratory study of the cat compared with the human. 
Prerequisite: Biology 201. 

Four hours per week. 

Given every year. 

One semester. Two hours credit. 

301. VETEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY 

A study of gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and 
later development of typical vertebrate forms. Prerequisites: Bi- 
ology 101-102, 201, and 202. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

Given in 1935; to be given in 1937. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

302. HISTOLOGY 

A study of cells, tissues and organ structure. Prerequisites : Biology 
101-102, 201 and 202. 

Lectures tw'o hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

Given in 1936; to be given in 1938. 

40 



Spring Hill College 

303. microscopic technique 

A laboratory course in methods of preparing tissues for microscopic 
study. Prerequisites: Biology 101-102, 201 and 202. 

Time to be arranged. Two hours credit. 

Given in 1937. 

401. INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY 

A study of matter and energy in relation to living things; solutions; 
diffusion and osmotic pressure; the physico-chemical structure of 
protoplasm. Prerequisites: Biology 101-102, 201, and chemistry 101- 
102, 201-202, 301-302, and Physics 201. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

Given in 1936-37; to be given in 1938-39. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

402. GENERAL PHYSIOLOGY 

The fundamental life processes of organisms from a general and 
comparative viewpoint. Prerequisites: Biology 401, Chemistry 401- 
402, and Physics 202. 

Lectures two hours per week; laboratory four hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

Given in 1937; to be given in 1939. 

403. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH 

Special work for advanced students and preparation of thesis. 

Credit to be arranged. 



Chemistry 



101-102. GENERAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

A course dealing with the fundamental laws and theories of Chem- 
istry together with the systematic study of the elements. The labora- 
tory experiments are designed to illustrate the matter of the course. 

Obligatory for all Freshmen B.S. 

Lectures 2 hours per week; laboratory 4 hours per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

201. ELEMENTARY QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 

This course involves the theoretical and practical study of the prin- 
ciples underlying the isolation of the metallic and acid-forming ele- 
ments. 

Obligatory for all Pre-Med. students and for all those majoring in 
Chemistry. 

Lectures 2 hours per week; laboratory 4 hours per week. 

One semester. Four hours credit. 

202. ELEMENTARY QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 

This course includes and emphasizes the elements of volumetric 
and gravimetric methods of analysis. 

Obligatory for all Pre-Med. students. 

Lecture 2 hours per week; laboratory 6 hours per week. 

One semester. Five hours credit. 

301-302. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

The principles of Organic Chemistry and its relation to General 
Chemistry are emphasized. Typical organic compounds are studied. 
General reactions and characteristics are discussed, and many appli- 
cations to practical life are given. 

Obligatory for all Pre-Med. students and for those majoring in 
Chemistry. 

Lectures 2 hours per week; laboratory 4 hours per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

41 



Spring Hill College 

401-402a. elementary physical chemistry 

This course is intended to acquaint the student with the fundamental 
principles of chemical theory. The structure of matter, thermody- 
namics and electrochemistry are discussed. 

Obligatory for Chemistry and Biology majors. 

Lectures 3 hours per week. Three hours credit. 

401b-402b. ELEMENTARY PHYSICAL LABORATORY 

This course is intended to accompany 401-402. It includes the dif- 
ferent methods of molecular weight determination, electrical conduc- 
tance, and the determination of hydrogen-ion concentration colori- 
metrically and electrometrically. 

Elective for Chemistry and Biology majors. 

Three hours per w'eek. Two hours credit. 

403-404. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 

A more extended discussion of the theory and practice of volumetric 
and gravimetric methods, including an introduction to electro- 
analysis. 

Lecture 2 hours per week; laboratory 6 hours per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

405-406. PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

An elementary course dealing with the Chemistry of the carbohy- 
drates, fats and proteins. The chemical basis underlying the phe- 
nomena of metabolism, enzyme absorption and digestion are dis- 
cussed. 

Lecture 3 hours per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours cerdit. 

407-408. PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 

A laboratory course to accompany 405-406. 
Four hours per week. 
Two semesters. Four hours credit. 



Commerce 

The three subjects from which candidates for the B.S.C. Degree 
must select their Major and related Minor are Accounting, Business 
Administration and Economics. Courses offered in these fields are 
here listed. 



Accounting 



1. BOOKKEEPING AND ACCOUNTING 

The bookkeeping equation applied to accounts; increase and de- 
creases in proprietorship; journal and journalizing; the ledger; 
posting, and the trial balance; the work sheet, the balance sheet, 
and the profit and loss statement; adjusting and closing the ledger; 

special journals. 

No college credit. 

42 



Spring Hill College 

111-112. PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING 

Meaning and purpose of accounting; the balance sheet; the state- 
ment of profit and loss; accounts and the ledger; adjusting and 
closing entries; books of original entry; controlling accounts; ac- 
crued and deferred items; the periodic summary; partnerships; 
nature and characteristics of the corporation; the voucher system; 
accounting for manufacturing; cost accounting; consolidated state- 
ments; analysis and interpretation of financial statements. 

Six hours credit. 

211-212. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING 

Fundamental process of accounting; working papers; statements; 
corporations; actuarial science; receivables; inventories ; consign- 
ments; installment sales; tangible fixed assets; investments; lia- 
bilities; funds and reserves; comparative statements; the analysis 
of working capital; profit and loss analysis; adjustment of applica- 
tion of funds. 

Six hours credit. 

311-312. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING 

Partnerships; venture accounts; insurance; receiver's accounts; 
realization and liquidation account; home office and branch account- 
ing; parent company and subsidiary accounting; consolidated state- 
ments; foreign exchange; estate and trusts; budgets; public 
accounts; bank accounting; stock brokerage. 

Six hours credit. 

313. ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

Scope and influence of accounting; elements of accounting; adjust- 
ing and closing entries; balance sheet; special statements and 
forms; miscellaneous accounting; balance inventory; comparisons 
and ratios; analyzing complete accounting reports; verification of 
financial statements. 

Three hours credit. 

411. COST ACCOUNTING 

The need and value of cost accounting; classifications of cost; 
process cost systems and specific order cost systems; manufacturing 
expense theory; accounting for material; accounting for labor costs; 
distribution of costs; debatable methods; relative values; establish- 
ment and uses of standard costs. 

Three hours credit. 

412. FEDERAL TAX ACCOUNTING 

Income tax legislation; returns for individuals; gross income; ex- 
empt income; deductions; net income; computation of individual 
taxes; returns for estates and trusts, partnerships and corporations; 
accounting procedure; administrative procedure, capital stock tax; 
estate tax; gift tax; excise taxes. 

Three hours credit. 

413. AUDITING AND C.P.A. PROBLEMS 

Qualifications, duties and responsibilities of the public auditor; ex- 
act rules covering every detail of making an audit of books and 
records of representative business concerns; methods of securing 
and handling engagements; w'orking papers and audit reports; 
C.P.A. problems of an advanced nature presented and analyzed. 

Three hours credit. 

43 



Spring Hill College 

490. preparation for the c.p.a. certificate 
Questions and problems based on examination given by the Ameri- 
can Institute of Accountants. Individual instruction given. 

Examinations for the certificate of Certified Public Accountant 
are held in Montgomery twice a year, in May and November. Appli- 
cations may be made to the Secretary of State. 

No college credit. 

Business Administration 

21-2. SHORTHAND 

A thorough study of the principles of Gregg Shorthand with special 
emphasis on phonetics. Dictation of business letters and interpreta- 
tion of unseen passages of court testimony. 

No college credit. 

31-2. TYPEWRITING 

A first course for students who wish to learn the elements of type- 
writing technique and general use of the machine. 

No college credit. 

103. PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS 

Forms of business enterprise; financing, management; wages and 
wages systems; the control of labor; purchasing; selling; advertis- 
ing; traffic; foreign trade and ocean traffic; credit; forecasting 
business condition; banking; exchange; insurance; principles of 
accounting; financial statements; cost accounting; investments; 
causes of business failures and remedies. 

Three hours credit. 

221-222. BUSINESS LAW 

Law in general, its definition, origin and sources; written and un- 
written law; law and equity; contracts defined and classified; 
origin of property; title to personal property; mortgages and their 
uses. 

Six hours credit. 

301-302. CORPORATION FINANCE 

Principles of financing; forms of business enterprise; the corporate 
form and its status before the law; owned and borrowed capital; 
basis of capitalization; sources of capital funds; disposition of gross 
earning; budgets; reorganization. 

Six hours credit. 

322. MONEY AND BANKING 

Brief history of origin and development of banking; early banks and 
banking systems of United States; operation of the Federal Reserve 
System; foreign banking systems; classes of credit and credit in- 
struments; money, credit and prices; international exchange. 

Three hours credit. 

402. BUSINESS AND OFFICE ADMINISTRATION 

Methods of organizing and controlling the work of industrial estab- 
lishments; selection of plant site; nearness to raw materials and 
to market; available labor supply; power and transportation; profit 
sharing; types of internal organization; office administration; per- 
sonnel; standards and records. 

Three hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

431. insurance 
Underlying principles, important practices and principal legal phases 
of life, fire, marine, employers' liability, fidelity, corporate surety, 
title, and credit insurance; state regulation of companies; under- 
writers' associations and their work. 

Three hours credit. 

441. REAL ESTATE 

What real estate is; the origin and development of real estate own- 
ership; practical discussion of the details involved in the conduct 
of transactions of real estate activity. 

Three hours credit. 

442. INVESTMENTS 

A study of the underlying principles of investment credit; elements 
of sound investment and methods of computing net earnings; amor- 
tization rights and convertibles; the investment policies of individ- 
uals and institutions; the investment market and its relation to the 
money market. 

Three hours credit. 



E 



conomics 



101. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY 

A comprehensive survey of man's utilization of the earth in making 
a living; a study of the world's major regions and of their present 
and potential production of food and raw materials for manufacture. 
Special attention will be devoted to the South in general and to 
Alabama in particular. 

Three hours credit. 

102. ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

The economic development of the United States from the period 
of settlement to the present time; origin and growth of leading 
American industries; chlajnges in industrial organization; com- 
mercial policies; influence of economic conditions on political his- 
tory; problems of expansion. 

Three hours credit. 

201-202. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS 

An analysis of production, distribution, and consumption; theories 
concerning rents, profits, interest and wages. A discussion of pro- 
proposed remedies for inequality of distribution of w'ealth; single tax, 
government ownership, profit-sharing, co-operative enterprises. 

Six hours credit. 

321. PUBLIC FINANCE 

The evolution of securities; organized security markets and their 
economic functions; origin, development, purpose, and operation of 
the New York Stock Exchange; the dangers and benefits of stock 
speculation; floor trader; specialist; odd-lot business; security 
deliveries, loans and transfers; the stock exchange and American 
business. 

Three hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

331. transportation principles 

Relation of transportation to industry and society; development and 
present status of American transportation systems; organization of 
transportation service; rates and regulations. 

Three hours credit. 

332. FOREIGN TRADE 

Foreign trade historically considered; products of foreign trade; 
trade barriers; modifications of tariffs; marketing of raw materials; 
marketing of manufactured products; the foreign firm and public 
law; settlement of disputes; protection against risks; combinations 
in world trade. 

Three hours credit. 

401. ELEMENTS OF STATISTICS 

An introduction to statistics; a brief consideration of statistical 
theory; collection, classification and presentation of economic data; 
construction of graphs and charts; study of index numbers; prob- 
lems of statistical research. 

Three hours credit. 

421. ADVERTISING AND SALESMANSHIP 

The specific purpose of advertising; the copy; slogans; trademarks; 
newspapers; magazines; advertising research; preparing and mak- 
ing the sales presentation; overcoming objections and closing the 
sale; sales promotion. 

Three hours credit. 

422. PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 

The marketing functions; marketing farm products; marketing raw 
materials; marketing manufactured products; distribution through 
brokers, jobbers, wholesalers, commission houses; market finance; 
market risk; market news; standardization; market price; the cost 
of marketing. 

Three hours credit. 

432. PUBLIC UTILITIES 

Characteristics of public utilities; regulation by franchises and com- 
missions; valuation; rate of return; rate structures; regulation of 
service, accounts and reports; public relations; public ownership. 

Three hours credit. 



Drawing 



101-2. MECHANICAL DRAWING 

Lettering, geometrical construction, orthographic projection, di- 
mensioning. 
Two semesters. Four hours credit. 

201-2. MECHANICAL DRAWING 

Isometric and oblique drawing, intersections and development of 
surfaces, tracing. 
Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

203-4. DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY 

A critical study of the science of drawing. The location of points, 
lines, planes; single-curved surfaces; surfaces of revolution; tangent 
lines and planes; intersection of surfaces; shades and shadows; per- 
spective. 

Prerequisite, Solid Geometry. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

205. topographical drawing 

Shades and shadows, representation of surface forms by contours 
and by shading with pencil, pen and colors. Topographical symbols, 
copying, enlarging and reducing maps. 

Two hours credit. 

206. MACHINE DRAWING 

Free-hand and mechanical drawing of machine parts and complete 
machines, piping, plans, etc. 



Two hours credit. 



Education 



301. HISTORY OF EDUCATION IN THE U. S. 

This course begins with a study of the origin and development of 
the various school systems, denominational and public, in the United 
States, section by section. It then takes up the advancement made 
in elementary, secondary and higher education. The treatment of 
such topics as professional education, technical and agricultural edu- 
cation, the preparation of teachers, art and manual education, com- 
mercial education, educational associations, is included in the course. 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

308. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

This course considers the nature, function and measurement of the 
original tendencies of the individual, and the modification of them 
which the school endeavors to bring about. That this purpose may 
be better effected, the student is directed in the study of the laws 
of learning, the learning curve, the efficiency and permanence of 
learning, transfer of training, the result of exercise, the measure- 
ment of achievement, the use of tests, the new type examinations. 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

335. EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 

The purpose of this course is to instruct the students of education 
in the importance of student participation in school activities out- 
side the class room. Considerable time is devoted to the theory and 
practice of the teaching of athletic sports, football, baseball, basket- 
ball, track sports, and boxing. The fundamental principles of various 
football systems, rules, training, special plays are among the topics 
dealt with. There is explicit insistence upon the transfer of training 
in punctuality, promptitude in the execution of plays and other de- 
sirable qualities from the field of play to the regular work of the 
school and of after life. Among other student activities discussed, 
are the following: student council, class organization; club, the 
poetry club, the dramatic club, the literary society, the debating so- 
ciety; musical organizations — the choir, the glee club, the band, the 
orchestra; the assembly; the commencement; the library; the study 
hall; the athletic association; school publications — the annual, the 
school magazine; publicity and public relations. 

Three hours credit. 
Given every year. 

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Spring Hill College 

336. principles of high school teaching 

This course studies the individual at the stage of his secondary edu- 
cation, his native and acquired tendencies to action, and deduces 
principles by which the teacher may be guided in his attempt to 
direct the interest and secure the attention of the pupil. Among the 
topics considered are: the aims in instruction, the class exercise; 
the essentials of good questioning, the modes of instruction; the 
importance of study; the prelection or assignment; the repetition or 
recitation; standards and measurements; the individual and social 
elements in secondary instruction. 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

435-436. OBSERVATION AND PRACTICE TEACHING 

One and one-half or two semester hours each session. Schedule to 
be arranged by each student individually with the head of the de- 
partment of education. 

In order to supplement its instruction in educational principles, 
aims, methods, curricula and procedure, and to cultivate professional 
skill in teaching, Spring Hill College has secured the co-operation 
of the McGill Institute. Through the courtesy of its administrators 
and teachers, McGill Institute thus becomes the proving ground for 
the professional students of the Department of Education, who have 
free access to its classrooms for observation of the methods prac- 
ticed therein and for supervised practice teaching. Co-operating with 
the State Department of Education, Spring Hill College requires 
that its candidates for degrees with a major in education present a 
minimum of 3 semester hours in observation and practice teaching 
with a minimum of 30 full periods of class teaching. 

Three hours credit. 

Given every year. 

M. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF HIGH SCHOOL TEACHING 

The object of this course is to give the student an intimate knowl- 
edge of the reason, aim and material of the chief subjects found 
in the high school curricula, and the recognized methods by which 
they are taught. The student should emerge from the course with 
such a comprehensive view of its proper distribution that he should 
be capable of constructing a satisfactory curriculum. 

462M. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING ENGLISH 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

466M. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING HISTORY 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

469BM. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING BIOLOGY 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

469PM. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING PHYSICS 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1934-35 and in alternate years thereafter. 

470CM. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING CHEMISTRY 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

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Spring Hill College 

472m. materials and methods of teaching french 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

475M. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING LATIN 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

477M. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING SPANISH 

Three hours credit. 
Given in 1935-36 and in alternate years thereafter. 

494M. MATERIALS AND METHODS OF TEACHING PHYS. EDUCATION 

Three hours credit. 
Given every year. 



English 



1. GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION 

A course in the essentials of grammar and in the various modes of 
composition. Required of Freshmen students who are deficient in the 
theory or practice of correct English. 

No credit. 

101-2. ADVANCED RHETORIC 

A course in the theory of rhetoric and the study of style based on 
reading, analysis and discussion of works of English prose authors. 
Insistence on the principles of literature and frequent practice in 
composition. Required of Freshmen, unless excused by examination. 

Six hours credit. 

103. POETRY 

A course in the study of the nature and elements of poetry, prin- 
ciples of versification, its various kinds, etc. Reading, analysis and 
appreciation of the chief poets, partly in class study, partly in as- 
signments. Frequent practice in composition. 

Three hours credit. 

104. TYPES OF ENGLISH PROSE 

A study of the chief forms of prose writing, narrative and expository. 
Required reading in the short story and the essay with class dis- 
cussions and frequent exercises in composition. 

Three hours credit. 

105-6. BUSINESS ENGLISH 

A course intended for students majoring in commerce. It comprises 
the theory and practice of effective expression in letters, reports, di- 
gests, and so forth. Models are studied, discussed, analyzed. Original 
themes weekly, with daily work in analyzing problems and outlines. 

Six hours credit. 

201-2. SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE 

A study of the historical background of the chief masterpieces of 
English literature from BeoWulf to Thomas Hardy. Readings in the 
principal authors and critical papers at weekly intervals. 
Required of all Sophomores. 

Six hours credit. 



49 



Spring Hill College 

203. the short story 

This course will study the rise and development of the Short Story 
from earliest times up to the present. While stories of other litera- 
tures will be carefully discussed, special attention will be directed 
to the American short story. Students will be required to analyze 
various short stories, and to write at least one original short story. 

Three hours credit. 

204. THE DRAMA 

The theory of the drama will be studied by means of lectures and 
assignments in its history and development; reading, analysis and 
study of works of principal English dramatists, especially Shakes- 
peare; composition in dialogue, dramatic sketches, playlets, and at 
least one complete drama will be required. 

Three hours credit. 

301. THE ENGLISH NOVEL 

The principal purpose of this course is to study the technique of the 
novel and the various schools of fiction and their tendencies with 
special attention to their ethical and literary value. Reading and 
discussion of noted novels. 

Three hours credit. 

302. SHAKESPEARE 

Shakespeare's life, influence, sources of his drama; an acquaintance 
by reading and assignments with the Shakespearian literature of 
criticism; reading, analysis and study of Shakespeare's plays, es- 
pecially in comparison with those of other dramatists. 

303. AESTHETICS AND LITERARY CRITICISM 

The philosophical basis of aesthetics, the elements of taste; the 
theory of criticism; a survey of critical standards; a study of the 
schools of criticism and of the work of the chief literary critics. 
Critical papers on assigned subjects will be required. 

Three hours credit. 

304. NEWMAN 

A study of the Present Position of Catholics in England, Idea ol a 
University, Apologia pro Vita Sua, with detailed analysis of thought 
and examination of literary merits. 
Required of all majors in English 

Three hours credit. 

305. MILTON 

A survey course in the life and work of Milton, with special em- 
phasis on the longer poems. 

Three hours credit. 

309. ENGLISH LITERATURE 

From Beowulf to 1500. A series of lectures on Old English and 
Middle English Literature. Among the authors studied will be such 
as Caedmon, Bede, Alfred the Great, Aelfric, and Chaucer. Attention 
will also be directed to a study of the early ballads and lyrics. Based 
on James McCullum's 'The Beginnings to 1500.' (Scribner's Eng- 
lish Literature Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

310. english literature 

The Renaissance. The student will have an opportunity in this course 
to study such great writers as Sir Thomas Wyatt, Henry Howard, 
Earl of Surrey, Sir Philip Sydney and Edmund Spenser. In this 
course the plays of Marlowe and Shakespeare will be especially 
stressed. Based on Robert Whitney Bolwell's 'The Renaissance.' 
(Scribner's English Literature Series.) 

311. ENGLISH LITERATURE 

The Seventeenth Century. This course will include a careful survey 
of the Puritan Age and that of the Restoration. Milton's Paradise 
Lost and Dryden's Hind and the Panther will be carefully studied 
and discussed. Based on Evert Mordecai Clark's 'The Seventeenth 
Century.' (Scribner's English Literature Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

312. ENGLISH LITERATURE 

The Eighteenth Century. In this course lectures will be given on 
Daniel Defoe, Addison and Steele, Alexander Pope and his circle, 
with a thorough study of the social and religious backgrounds of the 
period. Based on Joseph P. Blickensderfer's 'The Eighteenth Cen- 
tury.' (Scribner's English Ltierature Series.) 

Three hours credit. 

313. ENGLISH LITERATURE 

The Romantic Period. This important period in the development of 
English poetry and aesthetic ideals will be studed with a view to the 
appreciation of its historical and religious background. Bernhaum's 
"Guide Through the Romantic Movement" will be used and wide 
reading required in Wordsw'orth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Shelly, 
Lamb, Hazlitt, and DeQuincey. 

Three hours credit. 

314. ENGLISH LITERATURE 

The Victorian Period. The most important developments in the novel 
and drama. Impact of the Industrial Revolution on literature and 
thought. Particular study of Carlyle, Ruskin, Newman; Tennyson, 
Browning, Arnold. 

Three hours credit. 

315. ROMANTIC POETS 

A specialized study of the five great Romantic poets: Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Shelley. Philosophy and literary theory of 
the period. 

Three hours credit. 



Trench 

*1. ELEMENTARY FRENCH 

The Article, the Noun, the Adjective, the Numerals, the Pronouns. 
Conjugation of regular verbs and of the more common irregular 
verbs. Frequent themes. 
First semester. No college credit. 

*2. ELEMENTARY FRENCH 

Irregular verbs. Use of Moods and Tenses. Government of Verbs. 
Order of words in the Sentence. Frequent themes. De Maistre. 
Second semester. No college credit. 



"■Courses 1 and 2 are required of students who choose French for their 
college modern language and cannot present 2 High School units. 

51 



Spring Hill College 



101. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 

Review of Syntax. Prose Composition. Reading of graduated texts: 
Chateaubriand, Merimee, Loti. 

Three hours credit. 



102. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 

Continuation of preceding course. 



Three hours credit. 



201. ADVANCED FRENCH 

Survey of the History of French Literature, accompanied by written 
work in advanced prose composition. Text: Harper's French An- 
thology. 

Three hours credit. 

202. ADVANCED FRENCH 

Continuation of preceding course. 

Three hours credit. 

S01-2. THE FRENCH NOVEL 

A detailed study of different types of the French novel: Classical, 
Romantic, Realistic, and Contemporary, with reference to theme, 
characters, treatment, and style. 
One year course. 

Six hours credit. 

401. THE FRENCH DRAMA 

A study of the technique of the French drama. Special stress will 
be laid on the classical tragedy, Racine and Corneille. 

Three hours credit. 

402. THE FRENCH COMEDY 

A reading course with special attention to the works of Moliere. 

Three hours credit. 



berman 

•1. ELEMENTARY GERMAN 

The article. Declension of nouns, adjectives, and pronouns. Conju- 
gation of the auxiliary, weak, and strong verbs. Easy reading. Fre- 
quent themes. 

No college credit. 

*2. ELEMENTARY GERMAN 

Prefix verbs, reflexive verbs, modal auxiliaries. Syntax. Easy read- 
ing. Frequent themes. 

No college credit. 

101. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 

Review 1 of syntax. Prose composition. Reading of graduated German 
texts. 



Three hours credit. 

52 



Spring Hill College 



102. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 

Continuation of preceding course. 



Three hours credit. 



201. ADVANCED GERMAN 

Advanced composition. Survey of the history of German literature. 



202. ADVANCED GERMAN 

Continuation of Course 201. 



Three hours credit. 



Three hours credit. 



301-2. GERMAN DRAMA 

Technique of the drama in German, with special study of Goethe and 
Schiller. 
Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

401-402. THE GERMAN NOVEL 

A reading course in the modern novel. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 



ijreek 

1. ELEMENTARY GREEK 

Study of the elements of the Greek language, including the inflec- 
tion of article, noun, adjective and pronoun; conjugation of pure 
and contract verbs. Written exercises and class criticisms three 
times a week. 

Five hours per week. 

Texts: Connell, Greek Grammar; Connell, Greek Reader. 

2. ELEMENTARY GREEK 

Continuation of Greek 1. Thorough study of principal syntactical 
constructions in the cases of nouns, and the moods and tenses of 
verbs; liquid, mute, mi, and irregular verbs. Reading of selections 
from Xenophon's Anabasis; practice in prose composition. Five 
hours per week. 

Texts: Connell, Greek Grammar; Connell, Greek Reader. 

101. PROSE COMPOSITION 

Further study of applied syntax. Written exercises involving a 
thorough review of Greek syntax, connected prose based on assigned 
models. Examination of Greek rhetorical composition in readings 
from the works of Christian orators, Saint John Chrysostom and 
Saint Basil. 

Texts: Arnold, Greek Prose. 

Three hours credit. 

102. DEMOSTHENES 

Selections from the Philippics and Olynthiacs with attention to the 
essentials of Greek oratory; structure of speeches, idiomatic usage. 
Demosthenes' attitude tword his contemporaries. 

Three hours credit. 

53 



Spring Hill College 

201. HOMER 

The reading of selected passages in the original from the first six 
books of the Iliad. A comprehensive knowledge of the structure and 
story of the Iliad from a close reading of Chapman's translation. 
Comparison with the epic form of Vergil. 

Texts: Connell, Greek Grammar; Keep, Homer's Iliad. 

Three hours credit. 

202. GREEK DRAMA 

The reading of selected passages from Euripides' Hecuba, and Soph- 
ocles' Oedipus Tyrannus; together with a close examination of plot, 
characters and method of Greek tragedy as exemplified by the w'orks 
of Euripides and Sophocles. 

Texts: Connell, Greek Grammar; Bond and Walpole, Hecuba; 
White, Oedipus Tyrannus. 

Three hours credit. 

301. HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE 

A literature course aimed at acquainting the student with Greek 
modes of thought and Greek Literature as the basis of human cul- 
ture and of humanistic philosophy. Traces the growth of the literary 
forms through the Epic and Lyric Ages. 

Texts: Wright and Abbott, Ancient Greek Poetry; Croiset, History 
of Greek Literature. 

Three hours credit. 

302. HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE 

Study of the origin and growth of the literary genres of the Greeks 
and the continuity of the European tradition. A continuation of 
Greek 301 with close attention to the Dramatists and the Alexan- 
drine Period. Reading of the Greek Anthology. 

Texts: Croiset, History of Greek Literature; Mackail, Select Epi- 
grams from the Greek Anthology. 

Three hours credit. 



History 



101. EARLY MEDIEVAL HISTORY 

Migration of Nations. The Islam, the Franks, the Lombards, and the 
Holy See. Church and State. The Carolingians. The Northmen in 
Europe. The Making of Germany and the Rise of the Empire. Lay- 
Investiture. 

Three hours credit. 

102. THE MIDDLE AGES 

The Crusades. The Hohenstaufens. Invasion of the Mongols. Saint 
Louis. Life in the Middle Ages. The Exile of the Papacy. The Wes- 
tern Schism. The Hundred Years' War. The War of the Roses. Con- 
solidation of European Monarchies. 

Three hours credit. 

103. BACKGROUNDS OF CIVILIZATION 

(Introduction to History.) The aim of this course is to orient the 
student so that he may view in its proper setting the status of the 
world today. That this may be done in a reasonable way, the contrib- 
utory causes to the present intellectual, moral and religious culture 
are traced from their probable origins. In the same way the pro- 
gressive stages of the world's economic and political development 
as recorded in history are followed from the remote past to the 
present actual situation. 

Three hours credit. 

54 



Spring Hill College 

104. backgrounds of civilization 

(Introduction to History Continued.) This course reviews the revo- 
lution in industry brought on by the Machine Age. It points out the 
sociological and economic problems arising from the centralization 
of capital and mass production which follow'ed in the wake of new 
discoveries in science and industrial machines. The new facilities in 
world communication and transportation are considered together 
with the complicated systems of distribution and finance which they 
connote. 

Three hours credit. 

201. RENAISSANCE and REVOLUTION 

The Revival of Learning, of Art, and Politics. Social Conditions. The 
Protestant Revolution in Germany, England and Scotland. Catholic 
Revival. The Huguenot Wars in France. The Revolt of the Nether- 
lands. The Thirty Years' War. The Puritan Revolution. The Age of 
Louis XIV. The War of the Spanish Succession. The Church and the 
State. The making of Russia. The Rise of Prussia. The Downfall of 
Poland. The French Revolution. Napoleon Bonaparte. 

Three hours credit. 

202. EUROPE SINCE 1814 

The Industrial Revolution. England and France in the Nineteenth 
Century. The Unification of Germany. The Unification of Italy. The 
Social, Political and Religious Conditions in Europe. The Eastern 
Question. The Partition of Africa. The World War of 1914. Recon- 
struction after World War. 

Three hours credit. 

301. AMERICAN HISTORY TO THE RECONSTRUCTION PERIOD 

This course, with the following, aims to bring into relief the out- 
standing influences that have shaped the history of the United 
States from the Colonial Period to our own, stressing for this pur- 
pose topics of import for the social, economic and political develop- 
ment of the nation. First semester. 

Three hours credit. 

302. AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE THE RECONSTRUCTION PERIOD 

A course similar to the preceding, stressing in its latest phases the 
conditions and circumstances that led to America's participation in 
the Great War, with the resulting stimulus to a clearer national con- 
sciousness of the value and significance of American citizenship. 

Three hours credit. 

401. HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA 

European Background. Early discoveries and settlements in the is- 
lands and on the mainland of North, Central and South America. 
Civilization of the Natives. Spanish and Portuguese Colonial Sys- 
tems. Contribution of the Jesuit and Franciscan Missionaries to 
Culture and Civilization. Abuses of the Spanish Government. The 
Struggles for Independence. History of Independent Mexico and 
Central American Countries after 1821. Economic, Social and Political 
Life. 

** Three hours credit. 

55 



Spring Hill College 
Latin 

1. ELEMENTARY LATIN 

A study of the fundamentals of the Latin language, including the 
inflection of nouns, adjectives and pronouns; conjugation of the ir- 
regular, defective, deponent and semi-deponent verbs, and the peri- 
phrastic conjugations. Written exercises and class criticisms. 

Texts: Dow'd, Loyola Latin Elements; L'Hammond, Historia Sacra. 

2. elementary latin 

Thorough drill in the principal syntactical constructions in the cases 
of nouns, and the moods and tenses of verbs. Reading of selections 
from four books of Caesar's Gallic War, supplemented by practice in 
simple composition. 

Texts: Loyola Latin Elements; Caesar, Bellum Gallicum. 

3. LATIN COMPOSITION 

A further study of applied syntax in the subordinate clauses, result 
and concessive; direct and indirect questions; practice in correct 
word order and sequence of tenses. Reading of Cicero's First and 
Third Catilinarians. 

Texts: Gateway to Latin Composition; Cicero, In CatilinaM, I, III. 

4. LATIN COMPOSITION 

Completion of the study of syntactical constructions, including the 
constructions of indirect discourse, of dependent clauses both in di- 
rect and indirect discourse, and conditional sentences. Application 
of the rules of prosody and verse structure, scansion of the dactyllic 
hexameter. 

Texts: Gateway to Latin Composition; Vergil, Aeneid, I, II, III, IV. 

101. CICERO 

A careful examination of Latin rhetorical devices as exemplified in 
the Ciceronian style. Analytical study of the Pro Archia; apprecia- 
tion of Cicero's opinion on the value of humanistic studies and their 
influences on man. Written exercises and class criticisms. 

Texts: Cicero, Pro Archia; Arnold, Latin Prose Composition, 
Part I. 

Three hours credit. 

102. ROMAN HISTORIANS 

Study of the historical methods and literary style of Sallust, Taci- 
tus and Livy. Cicero's Letters as a source of historical information. 
Further practice in writing Latin according to the historical stylists. 
Texts: Arnold, Latin Prose Composition, Part II; Scoon, Mierow, 
Jones, Anthology of Roman Historians. 

Three hours credit. 

201. LATIN LYRIC POETRY 

The Odes of Horace, and selected Poems of Catullus, studied as 
examples of the classical lyrics. The life of Horace and his con- 
temporaries, his attitude to the Augustan Age as reflected in his 
works. Roman dependence on Greek models. Horace's literary in- 
fluence. 

Texts: Horace, Odes and Epodes (Bennett); Catullus, Poems (Mc- 
Daniel) . 

Three hours credit. 

56 



Spring Hill College 

202. roman satire 
A comparative study of the Latin Satirists, Horace and Juvenal, and 
their influence on modern literature. Originality of Roman Satire; 
tracing its growth from Lucilius through the Golden Age to Juvenal 
and Martial. 

Texts: Horace, Satires (Morris); Juvenal, Satires (Selections). 

Three hours credit. 

301. LATIN COMEDY 

The origin, evolution and chief characteristics of the Roman stage 
exemplified in selected plays of Plautus and Terence. An investiga- 
tion into the Greek sources and models. A comparative study of plot, 
diction and style. Plautus and Terence. 

Three hours credit. 

302. ECCLESIASTICAL LATIN 

Selections from Patristic Literature tracing the trend of Latin from 
the Silver Age to the Ecclesiastical Language of the Middle Ages. 
The decadence of literary style and diction and the sublimation of 
thought during this period. Study of late Latin syntax. 

Three hours credit. 



Mathematics 



1. ALGEBRA 

A brief review of elementary algebra. A detailed study of the third 
semester of high school algebra. 

Prerequisite: Two semesters of high school algebra. Required of 
all students offering but one unit of high school algebra. 

Three lectures per week. First semester. No credit. 

2. SOLID GEOMETRY 

An elementary course in the geometry of three dimensions. Equi- 
valent to high school solid geometry. 

Prerequisite: high school plane geometry. Required of all stu- 
dents having no high school credit in this subject. 

Three lectures per week. Second semester. No credit. 

101-2. MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS 

An introductory course. The essentials of algebra, trigonometry, an- 
alytic geometry, and calculus built up around the function concept. 
Applications to science and engineering. 

Prerequisite: Three semesters of high school algebra. Required of 
all majors in Mathematics, Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, and 
Biology. 

Four lectures per week. Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

103. COLLEGE ALGEBRA 

Rules of Algebra. Laws of Exponents. Linear and quadratic equa- 
tions. Progressions. Binomial theorem. Logarithms. Determinants. 
Solution of equations. 

Prerequisite: Three semesters of high school algebra. Required 
of all students not taking mathematics 101-2. Three lectures per 
week. First semester. Three hours credit. 

104. PLANE TRIGONOMERTY 

The six elementary functions. Solution of right and oblique tri- 
angles. Graphs. Logarithms. Solution of trigonometric equations. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 103. Required of all students not 
taking Mathematics 101-2. 

Three lectures per week. Second semester. Three hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

105. spherical trigonometry 
Similar to Mathematics 104 but applied to a spherical surface. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 104. Required in certain engineering 
courses. 

Two lectures per week. First semester. Two hours credit. 

107-8. BUSINESS MATHEMATICS 

Percentage. Simple and compound interest. Bank trade and cash 
discounts. Equations of accounts. Mathematics of sinking funds. 
Bond values and asset valuation. 

Prerequisite: High school algebra. Required of all majors in B.S.C. 

Three lectures per week. Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

201. DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS 

Functions, algebraic and transcendental. Limits. Continuity. Slopes. 
Maxima and Minima. Derivitives. Differentials. Geometrical and 
physical application. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101-2 or 103, 104, and 203. Required of 
all majors in Mathematics, Engineering, Physics, and Chemistry. 

Four lectures per week. First semester. Four hours credit. 

202. INTEGRAL CALCULUS 

The nature of integration. Integrals. Definite integrals. Reduction 
formulas. Geometrical and physical applications. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 201. Required of all majors in Mathe- 
matics, Engineering, Physics, and Chemistry. 

Four lectures per week. Second semester. Four hours credit. 

203. PLANE ANALYTIC GEOMETRY 

Loci and their equations. The straight line. The circle. The conic 
sections. Transformations of co-ordinates. Polar co-ordinates. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101-2 or 103 and 104. 

Required for all majors in Mathematics, and im certain Engineer- 
ing courses. 

Three lectures per week. First semester. Three hours credit. 

204. SOLID ANALYTIC GEOMETRY 

A three dimensional treatment of the point, line, plane, and surface. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 203. Required in certain Engineering 
courses. 

Tw'o lectures per week. Second semester. Two hours credit. 

301. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 

Elementary forms of ordinary differential equations of the first and 
second order. Application to science and engineering. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 201-2. Physics 201-2. Required of all 
majors in Mathematics or Physics. 

302. ADVANCED CALCULUS 

Multiple integrals. Elliptic integrals. Partial differentiation. Taylor's 
Theorem. Fourrier series. Expansion of functions. Complex variables. 
Hyperbolic functions. 

Prequisite: Mathematics 201-2. Required of all majors in Mathe- 
matics or Physics. 

Four lectures per week. Second semester. Four hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

401. higher algebra 

Theory of numbers and invariants. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 301, 302. Required of all majors in 
Mathematics. 

Three lectures per week. First semester. Three hours credit. 

402. THEORY OF EQUATIONS 

Binomial equation. Roots of higher degree equations. Numerical so- 
lutions. Theory of the general system of linear equations. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 401. Required of all majors in Mathe- 
matics. 

Three lectures per week. Second semester. Three hours credit. 



Philosophy 



201. LOGIC 

A. Formal Logic 

Simple apprehension, classification of ideas; verbal terms, the classi- 
fication and use; logical division, definition; judgments and propo- 
sitions, their division according to quality, quantity and matter; op- 
position, equivalence, and conversion of propositions. Reasoning; 
fundamental principles of reasoning; the syllogism, its laws, figures 
and modes, other forms of reasoning, induction, analogy; classifica- 
tio nof arguments according to their validity; sophisms; method; 
the circle. 

B. Applied Criteriology 

Conceptual truth and the possibility of attaining it; state of the 
mind with regard to truth. Certitude; it nature, kind; Skepticism; 
the Methodical Doubt; opinion, trustworthiness of the human fa- 
culties for the attainment of truth; consciousness, the external 
senses; the intellect, Nominalism, Conceptualism, exaggerated and 
moderate realism. Sources of certitude; human testimony; universal 
testimony; Divine testimony; tradition; history; the new criticism; 
objective evidence. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Three hours credit. 

202. GENERAL METAPHYSICS 

A. Ontology 

Being and its transcendental attributes; real being, logical being; 
extension, comprehension, analogy, unity, truth, goodness. State of 
being: Actual and possible; proximate and ultimate; foundation of 
intrinsic possibility. Kinds of being: substance, accident; the Aris- 
totelian categories. Causality. Causes in general; material, formal 
and efficient; the first cause; final cause; exemplary cause. Perfec- 
tion of being; simple and composite; finite and infinite; contingent 
and necessary; time and eternity; order, beauty, sublimity. 

B. Cosmology 

General properties of corporeal substance: quantity; continuous ex- 
tension, condensation and rarefaction; impenetrability, space, place; 
motion, time; change, substance, accidents. Intrinsic constituents of 
corporeal substances; Atomism; Dynamism; Hylomorphism. Organic 
life; the vital principle, nutrition, growth; reproduction; sensitive 
life, sense perceptions, sensuous appetite, spontaneous locomotion; 
the dynamic principle; the substantial form: Darwinism rejected. 

Three hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 



301. PSYCHOLOGY 



The human intellect and its proper object; its spirituality proved by 
its acts; origin of ideas; innate ideas; Empiricism and Ontologism 
rejected. The human will and its formal object; its freedom; its con- 
trol of the other faculties. Nature of the human soul; a substantial 
principle, simple, spiritual, immortal, its union with the body; its 
origin. The unity and antiquity of the human race. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy Four hours credit. 

302. SPECIAL METAPHYSICS (Theodicy) 

The existence of God; metaphysical, physical and moral proofs. The 
nature and attributes of God; His self-existence, infinity, unity, im- 
mutability, eternity and immensity. 

His operative attributes: a) The Divine intelligence; His knowl- 
edge of pure intelligence, of vision; scientia media of futuribles. 
b) the Divine will; Its holiness; Its primary and secondary objects; 
Its relation toward moral and physical evil. Action of God in the 
universe; creation; conservation; concurrence; Divine providence; 
miracles. 

Text: Shallo's Scholastic Philosophy. Three hours credit. 

305. HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY 

Oriental Philosophy; the Greeks: Socrates, Plato, Aristotle. The 
Gnostics and Neo-Platonists. The early Fathers of the Church. Med- 
ieval Philosophy. The rival schools and tendencies among the 
Scholastics. The Thomistic synthesis. 

Two hours credit. 

306. HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY 

Descartes and his followers; Malebranche, Locke, Hume, Voltaire 
and the Encyclopaedists. Leibnitz. Sensists and the Scottish Scho»l. 
The Transcendentalists : Kant, Fichte, Schelling and their schools 
of thought. The Neo-Kantians. Neo-Scholasticism and the present 
outlook. 

Two hours credit. 

401. GENERAL ETHICS 

Ethics denned. The material and formal objects of ethics. The hu- 
man act; the voluntary, the free and deliberate. Causes modifying 
the voluntary and free. The ultimate end of man. The Eternal Law; 
the Natural Law. Moral Obligation denned; source of moral obli- 
gation. The sources of positive law in the natural law; essential 
conditions of positive law. The morality of human acts and the 
norm of morality. Refutation of hedonism. Utilitarianism, Moral 
Sensism and Moral Rationalism. The specific determinants of mor- 
ality. Merit and demerit. The perfert sanction of the moral law. 
The obligation of following the dictates of conscience. Natural 
rights. Virtues and vices. Character. 

Four hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 



402. SPECIAL ETHICS 



Man's duties towards God. Man's duties towards himself. Man's 
duties of justice and charity towards others. The Natural Right of 
private ownership; limitations on the exercise of the right. The 
duties of w'ealth. Refutation of irresponsible ownership. Explana- 
tion and critique of Marxian Socialism, Agrarian Socialism and Syn- 
dicalism. Modes of acquiring property. The obligations and rights 
arising from contracts. The duties and rights of buyer and seller, 
of employer and employe. Society in general. The Family: Divine 
institution of marriage; its primary and secondary ends; the unity 
and indissolubility of marriage; parental authority. Rights and du- 
ties of parents in education. Civil society: its nature, origin, end. 
Origin of civil authority and government by consent of the governed. 
Social and distributive justice. Specific forms of government. The 
repression of crime and capital punishment. The moral law govern- 
ing international relations. Conditions of a just war. 

Pour hours credit. 



Physical Education 

Ample opportunity is offered the student for physical exercise in 
many forms of competitive sport. Intramural leagues are organized 
in football, basketball, and baseball. Boxing matches are staged. 
Swimming in the college lake, golf on the college course, and tennis on 
the Mobile Hall courts are all the year sports. 

To stimulate students not naturally prone to systematic exercise, 
and to create in them a useful interest in some form of recreational 
activity, all Freshmen and Sophomores are required to register in one 
or other of the courses here listed : 

101-102. FRESHMAN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Freshmen must choose one of the following sections: 

Section A. — Major Sports. Competition for the Freshman team in 
current sport. 

Section B.— Minor Sports. Two hours per week of Tennis, Golf, In- 
door Baseball, Swimming. 

Section C— Remedial Exercise. Light activities for those unable to 
follow more violent sports. 

One hour credit. 

201-202. SOPHOMORE PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Sophomores must choose one of the following sections: 

Section A. — Major Sports. Competition for the Varsity team in cur- 
rent sport. 

Section B. — Swimming. Three hours per week of swimming. 
Section C. — Indoor Baseball. Tennis. Two hours per week. 

One hour credit. 

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Spring Hill College 
Physics 

201-2. GENERAL PHYSICS 

The essentials of the classical concepts of mechanics, heat, elec- 
tricity, and light. Introduction to the modern physics of the structure 
of matter. Application to science and industry. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 101-2, or 103 and 104. Required of all 
majors in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, or Mathematics. 

Three lectures and one laboratory per week. 

Two semesters. Eight hours credit. 

203. SURVEYING 

Theory, use, and adjustment of instruments. Methods of computa- 
tion. Practical field work. Topographic map-making. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 104, or 101-2. Recommended for all 
majors in Engineering . 

One lecture and four hours of field work per week. 

One semester. Three hours credit. 

301-2. ELECTRICITY 

Electrical nature of matter. Source of potentials. Production of cur- 
rents. Flow of electricity through vacuum, gases, liquids, and solids. 
Circuit problems. Magnetic phenomena. Thermo-electricity. Vacuum 
tubes. Application. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201-2; Mathematics 201-2. Required of all 
majors in physics. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

303-4. ATOMIC PHYSICS 

Atomic theories. The structure of atoms and molecules. The mech- 
anics of matter. Corpuscular theories of light. Interaction of radia- 
tion and matter. Spectral lines. X-rays. Infra-red rays. Quantum 
theory. Relativity. Metaphysics. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201-2; Chemistry 101-2. Mathematics 201-2 
recommended. Required of all majors in Physics. Optional with Bi- 
ology 101-2 for majors in Chemistry. 

Three lectures per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

305-6. ASTRONOMY 

A general study of the solar system and the sidereal universe. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201-2; Mathematics 101-2; 201-2 recommen- 
ded. Recommended for majors in Physics or Mathematics. 

Three lectures per week. 

One or Two semesters. Three or six hours credit. 

307-8. ANALYTICAL MECHANICS 

A study of statics, kinetics, and dynamics. Application to physics 
and engineering. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201-2. Mathematics 201-2, 301 recommended. 
Required of all majors in Physics or Mathematics. 

Three lectures per week. 

Two semesters. Six hours credit. 

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309. physical optics 

Dispersion. Interference. Diffraction. Double refraction. Polarization. 
Magneto-optics. Spectroscopy. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201-2; Mathematics 201. Required of all 
majors in Physics. 

Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. 

Three hours credit. 

310. THERMODYNAMICS 

The nature of heat. The phenomena of radiation, conduction, and 
convection. The law of Conservation of Energy, Entropy, Free 
energy. 

Prerequisites: Physics 201-2; Mathematics 301. Required of all 
majors in Physics. 

Three lectures per week. 

Second semester. Three hours credit. 

401-2. ADVANCED ELECTRICITY 

The vacuum tube as an oscillator, amplifier, and detector. Electro- 
magnetic waves and antennas. Ultra high frequency phenomena. 
Prerequisites: Physics 301-2; Mathematics 301. Recommended for 
all majors in Physics. 

Two lectures per week and one laboratory period. 

One or tw'o semesters. Three or six hours credit. 

403. SEMINAR 

Reports on recent experimental and mathematical papers. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing. Recommended for all majors in 
Physics. 

Two semesters. One hour credit. 



Political Science 



101. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 

American National Government. The historical background of the 
Federal Constitution and of political issues in the United States, and 
the organization and functions of the National Government. The 
President. The Cabinet. The Senate. The House of Representatives. 
The Supreme Court and the Subordinate Federal Courts. Local and 
State Government in the United States. The place of the States in 
the Nation. The State Constitutions. The State Legislature. The 
State Courts. Organization and functions of administration in coun- 
ties and cities. 

Three hours credit. 

102. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT 

A comparative study of the governmental organization and adminis- 
tration of the principal European nations. 

Three hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 



201. PARTY POLITICS 



The development of political parties in the United States. Import- 
ance of the extra-constitutional element in American Government. 
Party platforms. Presidential campaigns and elections. The nomin- 
ating machinery; the Presidential primary and the nominating con- 
vention. Party patronage. The spoils system and civil service reform. 
State parties and practical politics in local government. 

Three hours credit. 

202. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 

Fundamental principles of the United States Constitution viewed in 
the light of their history, development and application. The making 
of the Constitution. The Constitution regarded as a grant of power. 
Federal powers and State powers. The principal of "checks and 
balances." The doctrine of Judicial Supremacy. Constitutional Limi- 
tations on Legislative Power. Limits of the Police Power of the 
States. Guarantees of the Fourteenth Amendment. Religious Liberty. 
The Fifteenth Amendment and the Negro Problem. State Consti- 
tutions. 

Three hours credit. 



Psychology 



301. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 

The normal functioning of the mind. Proper object of the intellect. 
Origin of ideas. Nature and relationship of the various faculties of 
the soul. 

Three hours credit. 

308. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

The nature and laws of learning. Conditions most favorable to ef- 
ficient and economical learning. Permanence of learning, transfer 
of learning, measurement of achievement. Prerequisite: Psychology 
301. 

Three hours credit. 

402. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Relation of the abnormal to normal in psychology. Present-day con- 
ception of mental disorders. The chief types. Remote causes: in- 
herited emotional instability, environment. Proximate or precipi- 
tating causes. Detailed study of examples of major classifications. 
Treatment. 

Three hours credit. 



Public Speaking 



201. THE OCCASIONAL PUBLIC ADDRESS 

Informal public address: the presentation of business propositions 
before small or large audiences; impromptu and extempore speak- 
ing; after-dinner talks. Speeches for various occasions. Glass ex- 
ercises, individual criticism, and conferences. 

Two hours credit. 

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202. ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATING 



Briefing of arguments. Methods of development and arrangement. 
Exposure of common fallacies in argumentation. The essentials of 
parliamentary law and practice. The manner of conducting deliber- 
ative assemblies. Class exercises, criticism, and conferences. 

Two hours credit. 



Relig 



ion 

101. THE COMMANDMENTS OF GOD 

The Catholic theory of Morality. The fundamental obligations of the 
Christian. Detailed study of the various commandments with ap- 
plication to practical cases. 

102. THE SEVEN SACRAMENTS 

An advanced study of the meaning and value of the Sacraments. 
Their place in the Catholic economy. 

Two semesters. Tw'o hours credit. 

Required of all Catholics in Freshman or Sophomore year. Given 
Freshmen 1936-1937. 

201-202. CHRISTIAN APOLOGETICS 

Revelation and the Church of Christ. A study of Christianity as a 
revealed religion. Divine institution of the Church. Marks of the 
Church. Its end and constitution. 

Required of all Catholics. Given to Sophomores, 1936-1937. 

Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

301-302. CHRISTIAN LIFE AND WORSHIP 

A study of the vital forces of the corporate worship of the Catholic 
religion that contribute to the upbuilding of individual character and 
social solidarity. The Mass, the crowning act of Christian worship. 

Given to Catholic Juniors, 1936-1937. 

Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

303-304. HISTORY OF THE CHURCH 

First semester: From the beginning to the Renaissance. 
Second semester: From the Renaissance to the present day. 

Required of Catholic Juniors, 1937- 

Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

401. CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ORDER 

A study of the ideal social order as delineated in the Papal Ency- 
clicals, Rerum Novarum and Quadragesimo Anno. Rejection of the 
opposite extremes of Communism and Capitalism. 

One semester. One hour credit. 

402. CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE 

Catholic doctrine on the morality of sex. The Sacrament of Matri- 
mony. Premarital chastity. Prenuptial requirements. Rights, duties 
and graces of married couple. 

One semester. One hour credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

403-404. catholic moral system 

A popular survey of the chief principles of moral and ascetic the- 
ology. Precepts and counsels. 
Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

113-114. COMPARATIVE RELIGION 

Definition and division of religions. A general history of the world's 
great religions with stress on the common factors and characteristic 
differences. 

Required of Non-Catholic Freshmen and Sophomores. Given al- 
ternate years, 1935, 1937, etc. 

Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

213-214. BIBLICAL CRITICISM 

The notion of inspiration. Application to the books of the New Testa- 
ment. Method and spirit of higher criticism. Historical value of New 
Testament. Difficulties answered. 

Required of Non-Catholic Freshmen and Sophomores. Given al- 
ternate years, 1934, 1936, etc. 

Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

313-314. ANALYSIS OF FAITH 

Faith, its nature and norm. The act of faith. Relation of reason and 
revelation. Faith and Science. 

Required of Non-Catholic Juniors and Seniors. Given alternate 
years, 1935, 1937, etc. 

Two semesters. Two hours credit. 

413-414. CHRISTIAN MORALS 

The obligation of morality. Bases in reason and aids from Faith. 
Practical applications. 

Required of Non-Catholic Juniors and Seniors. Given alternate 
years, 1934, 1936, etc. 

Two semesters. Two hours credit. 



Sociology 



101. ELEMENTARY 

Definition of Sociology: its relation to Ethics, Revealed Religion, 
Political and Economic Science. The fundamental facts and princi- 
ples relating to the individual, the family and the state, and their 
mutual realtions. 

Three hours credit. 

102. ELEMENTARY (continued) 

Fundamental facts and principles relating to private property, capi- 
tal, labor, and international society. 

Three hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

201-202. economic relations 

Private ownership: rights aind duties. False theories of property 
rights. Present distribution and control of wealth. Distributive own- 
ership of the means of production. Government ownership. Co- 
operatives; consumers; producers; credit. Government supervision 
of industry, commerce and finance in the interests of the common 
good. Capitalism as a vicious system: irresponsible ownership, free 
competition, economic domination, economic nationalism and im- 
perialism, financial internationalism. The problem of wages: the in- 
dividual and family living wage, minimum wage laws. Modification 
of the wage system: labor participation in management, profit- 
sharing and labor stockholding. Strikes, industrial arbitration. La- 
bor Unions of different kinds. International labor legislation. (Al- 
ternative to this course: Economics, 201-202.) 

Six hours credit. 

301. SOCIAL CASE WORK 

The philosophy, methods and processes of social case work; ob- 
servation and understanding of family and individual needs; agen- 
cies created to meet them. The ethical aspects of case work. 

Three hours credit. 

302. SOCIAL HISTORY: SOCIAL ORIGINS 

Early groupings among primitive people. Domestic soceity. Position 
of woman and the child. Sibs and tribal relationships. Notion of 
property. Slavery. Primitive morality and religion. 

Three hours credit. 

304. SOCIAL HISTORY: HISTORY OF SOCIAL WORK 

Historical antecedents of present-day social work. Greek and Roman 
practice; Hebrew social legislation; Christian concept of charity. 
Medieval charities under ecclesiastical, communal, or guild direction?- 
The post-Reformation poor-law's. Rise of professional social work. 
Social work of religious orders. 

Two hours credit. 

401. SOCIALISM AND REVLUTIONARY COMMUNISM 

Historical and literary antecedents of Karl Marx's "Capital." Nature 
and tenets of Marxian Socialism; critique of the same. Historical 
sketch of Bolshevism. Soviet governmental system; internal policy. 
Communist international propaganda and activities. Defensive meas- 
ures. (Recommended supplement to this course: Religion 401.) 

Two hours credit. 

402. SOCIAL ETHICS 

Cf. Philosophy 402— Special Ethics. 

Four hours credit. 

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403. THE FAMILY 



Conjugal society, natural: monogamy, polygyny, polyandry. Matri- 
archal and patriarchal families. The evolutionist theory of marriage. 
Divorce: prevalence, causes, consequences, remedies. Birth-control 
and feticide. Social and economic emancipation of woman. The Eu- 
genic Movement. Family disintegration: forces hostile to the family. 
Economic security: family living wage and allowances; mothers' 
pensions. Rights and duties of parents in education; sex-education 
and training to chastity. Parent-teacher co-operation. Industrialism 
and the home; woman in industry. Equal rights amendment; Child 
Labor Amendment. The State and Marriage. 

Three hours credit. 



404. THE STATE AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

Origin of civl society and authority. Theories of Hobbes, Locke, 
Rousseau; the early American theory of the State. The protective 
and promotive functions of the State. Relation of the State to the in- 
dividual and the family. The Liberal, Socialist and Fascist State; 
the Corporative State. State assistance and compulsory social in- 
surance. Necessity of social legislation and of government regula- 
tion of economic activity. Representative government and political 
parties. Plural vote and proportional representation. Principles of 
just taxation: inheritance taxes, income taxes, corporation taxes. 
The State and morals. The natural society of nations; international 
law. Patriotism, Nationalism, Internationalism. Pacifism, true and 
false. Causes of war; conditions of a just war. Measures to insure 
peace. 

Three hours credit. 



405. SOCIAL PROBLEMS: POVERTY AND DEPENDENCY 

Definitions: causes, consequence. Preventive and remedial meas- 
ures. Outdoor and indoor relief. Comparative merits of the dole and 
of work relief. Public and private relief agencies and their co-or- 
ordination. Comparative merits of public and private charity and 
their mutual relations. The St. Vincent de Paul Society, and social 
work of religious orders. 

Two hours credit. 



406. SOCIAL PROBLEMS: UNEMPLOYMENT 

Causes: personal, natural, industrial, social. Preventive measures: 
budgeted production, long-range planning of public w'orks by muni- 
cipalities and state and national governments; public labor ex- 
changes. Remedial: Unemployment insurance, private by Labor 
Unions and employers; State-aided and compulsory. 

Two hours credit. 

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Spring Hill College 

407. social problems: crime and juvenile delinquency 

General conditions of crime in the United States. Analysis and 
evaluation of various schools of criminology. Retribution; repres- 
sion; reformation; prevention. Treatment of the criminal; parole 
and merit system. Necessary legal, judicial and police reforms. The 
juvenile delinquent and the juvenile court. 

Two hours credit.. 



S P 



amsJ 



*1. ELEMENTARY SPANISH 



Study of the most widely used words in Spanish. Phonetics. Class 
work will consist of dictation, reading and conversation based on 
the day's lesson. Oral drill of auxiliary and regular verbs. 



No college credit. 



*2. ELEMENTARY SPANISH 



Fundamental principles of Spanish grammar, studied and applied 
in dictation, readi